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Publications (7)10.34 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Little is known on the long-term validity of reference equations used in the calculation of FEV(1) and FEV(1)/FVC predicted values. This survey assessed the prevalence of chronic airflow obstruction in a population-based sample and how it is influenced by: (i) the definition of airflow obstruction; and (ii) equations used to calculate predicted values. Subjects aged 45 or more were recruited in health prevention centers, performed spirometry and fulfilled a standardized ECRHS-derived questionnaire. Previously diagnosed cases and risk factors were identified. Prevalence of airflow obstruction was calculated using: (i) ATS-GOLD definition (FEV(1)/FVC<0.70); and (ii) ERS definition (FEV(1)/FVC<lower limit of normal) with European Community for Coal and Steel (ECCS) reference equations and with predicted values derived from the presumably normal fraction of the studied population. A total of 5008 subjects (4764 adequate datasets) were studied. Prevalence of airflow obstruction was 8.71% with ATS-GOLD definition and 6.40% with ERS definition and ECCS predicted values. The ERS definition with predicted values derived from the studied population provided a 7.96% prevalence. Severity distribution of airflow obstruction was also influenced by the equation used to calculate predicted values of FEV(1). Prevalence and severity of chronic airflow obstruction are influenced not only by the definition used but also by equations used to calculate predicted FEV(1)/FVC and FEV(1) values. These equations likely need to be periodically revised.
    Respiratory medicine 11/2008; 102(11):1568-74. · 2.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Data on the individual and collective impact of chronic airflow obstruction at a population level are scarce. In a nationwide survey, dyspnoea, quality of life and missed working days were compared between subjects with and without spirometrically diagnosed chronic airflow obstruction. Subjects aged > or =45 yrs were recruited in French health prevention centres (n = 5,008). Results of pre-bronchodilator spirometry and questionnaires (European Community Respiratory Health Survey-derived questionnaire and European quality of life five-dimension questionnaire) were collected. Adequate datasets were available for 4,764 subjects aged 60+/-10 yrs (only 2% were aged > or =80 yrs). The prevalence of airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity of <0.70) was 7.5%. The vast majority (93.9%) of cases had not been diagnosed previously. Health status was significantly influenced by dyspnoea. Both were associated with the number of missed working days. Despite mild-to-moderate severity, subjects with chronic airflow obstruction exhibited more dyspnoea, poorer quality of life and higher numbers of missed working days (mean 6.71 versus 1.45 days.patient(-1).yr(-1) in patients without airflow obstruction, for the population with no known heart or lung disease). In conclusion, even mild-to-moderate airflow obstruction is associated with an impaired health status, which represents an additional argument in favour of early detection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
    European Respiratory Journal 07/2008; 31(6):1227-33. · 6.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction The number of new skin cancers has constantly increased in France over the past two decades. The role of sun exposure can partly explain this phenomenon and justifies the development of information and prevention campaigns to change peoples’ attitude towards sun bathing. To be effective, we need to know how much information and what attitudes the population currently has with regard to the sun. Although several studies in France have targeted children, little data is available regarding adults. This trial was aimed at pinpointing the knowledge, attitude and behavior of adults regarding sun exposure. Material and methods Data were collected during a randomized multicenter study on the prevention and early diagnosis of cutaneous tumors, conducted in 26 Health Centers from 1998 to 2000. Standardized questionnaires were handed to those consulting to assess their knowledge, attitudes and behavior towards sun bathing. The population was composed of 41 143 adults aged over 30, consulting one of the 26 Health Check-up units. Analysis of the data was made using SAS v 6.12 and STATA 7.0 software. Logistic regression identified the explicative factors of knowledge and behavior. All the statistical analyses were considered significant above a threshold of α < 5%. Results A total of 33 021 persons filled-in the self-questionnaire. Forty-nine percent were women and 51% were men, with a mean age of 50 years. Geographically, 25% lived in the North-East, 16% in the North-West, 25 p.cent in the South-East and 34% in the South-West. Thirty percent claimed that they tanned without burning and 2% of the population studied had often suffered from sun burn, generally when they were adult. The risks related to sun burn were known, because 92% knew that the sun increased the risk of skin aging and 89% knew that it increased the risk of skin cancer. Regarding sun screens, knowledge was not so good; 42% thought that all products were the same and 53% that they allowed one to sun bathe longer. This knowledge was better in those with fair skins, in those who had a history of sun burn, in women and in those who lived in the northern areas of France. Conversely, knowledge decreased with age and was limited in those aged over 60. Regarding behavior, those with fair skin and who reddened under the sun without tanning, protected themselves more. The women declared they protected themselves more than the men, but they used less sun protective measures (clothing, hats…), other than sun screens, than men. Subjects aged over 60 protected themselves more than younger subjects. Lastly, a personal cutaneous history increased protective behavior, and those from northern France protected themselves more than those from the South. Discussion This analysis of 33 021 adults aged over 30 shows the good global knowledge of the consequences of sun bathing, but also the lack of knowledge on the interest of using external sun protection and the role of physical means of protection. Attitudes varied depending on gender, age and phototype and also depending on the area where they lived. Despite good knowledge, the most frequent behavior of adults aged over 30 is still not appropriate with differences depending on age, gender and area, which must prompt more appropriate targeting of prevention campaigns according to the populations concerned.
    Annales De Dermatologie Et De Venereologie - ANN DERMATOL VENEREOL. 01/2005; 132(8):652-657.
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    ABSTRACT: The number of new skin cancers has constantly increased in France over the past two decades. The role of sun exposure can partly explain this phenomenon and justifies the development of information and prevention campaigns to change peoples' attitude towards sun bathing. To be effective, we need to know how much information and what attitudes the population currently has with regard to the sun. Although several studies in France have targeted children, little data is available regarding adults. This trial was aimed at pinpointing the knowledge, attitude and behavior of adults regarding sun exposure. Data were collected during a randomized multicenter study on the prevention and early diagnosis of cutaneous tumors, conducted in 26 Health Centers from 1998 to 2000. Standardized questionnaires were handed to those consulting to assess their knowledge, attitudes and behavior towards sun bathing. The population was composed of 41 143 adults aged over 30, consulting one of the 26 Health Check-up units. Analysis of the data was made using SAS v 6.12 and STATA 7.0 software. Logistic regression identified the explicative factors of knowledge and behavior. All the statistical analyses were considered significant above a threshold of alpha<5%. A total of 33 021 persons filled-in the self-questionnaire. Forty-nine percent were women and 51% were men, with a mean age of 50 years. Geographically, 25% lived in the North-East, 16% in the North-West, 25 p.cent in the South-East and 34% in the South-West. Thirty percent claimed that they tanned without burning and 2% of the population studied had often suffered from sun burn, generally when they were adult. The risks related to sun burn were known, because 92% knew that the sun increased the risk of skin aging and 89% knew that it increased the risk of skin cancer. Regarding sun screens, knowledge was not so good; 42% thought that all products were the same and 53% that they allowed one to sun bathe longer. This knowledge was better in those with fair skins, in those who had a history of sun burn, in women and in those who lived in the northern areas of France. Conversely, knowledge decreased with age and was limited in those aged over 60. Regarding behavior, those with fair skin and who reddened under the sun without tanning, protected themselves more. The women declared they protected themselves more than the men, but they used less sun protective measures (clothing, hats...), other than sun screens, than men. Subjects aged over 60 protected themselves more than younger subjects. Lastly, a personal cutaneous history increased protective behavior, and those from northern France protected themselves more than those from the South. This analysis of 33 021 adults aged over 30 shows the good global knowledge of the consequences of sun bathing, but also the lack of knowledge on the interest of using external sun protection and the role of physical means of protection. Attitudes varied depending on gender, age and phototype and also depending on the area where they lived. Despite good knowledge, the most frequent behavior of adults aged over 30 is still not appropriate with differences depending on age, gender and area, which must prompt more appropriate targeting of prevention campaigns according to the populations concerned.
    Annales de Dermatologie et de Vénéréologie 01/2005; 132(8-9 Pt 1):652-7. · 0.60 Impact Factor
  • Revue D Epidemiologie Et De Sante Publique - REV EPIDEMIOL SANTE PUBL. 01/2004; 52:71-72.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to evaluate mammography use and indications (diagnosis or screening) among 19,253 women aged 35 to 75 attending a health screening centre. The data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire completed after by an interview with a nurse. Mammography use is frequent in women attending a health screening centre, even before the age of 50: 79.1% had undergone at least one mammography during their life and for 47.3% a screen had been performed within the last three years. Nevertheless mammography was only used by 65.2% of the women aged 50-69 years, target age group of the screening programme. A logistic regression model adjusting for multiple variables was used to examine factors associated with women who underwent a screen within the last three years. Women more likely to be screened were aged 50-69 (vs age 35-49: OR=3.1), used regular gynaecological care (OR=4.5), had a family history of breast cancer (OR=1.45), had in their district a breast cancer screening campaign (OR=1.93). The study indicated that women under 50 years of age with a family history of breast cancer and women aged 70 and over were under-screened. When a campaign for breast cancer screening was organised in the district the screening rates were higher in the target population (71,4% vs 60,1%) although only 64% of the women reported having attended. Current recommendations for breast cancer screening should be reviewed in the light of these results.
    Bulletin du cancer 12/2002; 89(11):957-62. · 0.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to evaluate mammography rates and indications (diagnosis or screening) among women from 35 to 50 of age, and to search the main factors associated to mammographic screening. The data were collected from 6409 women through a specific questionnaire completed by a nurse. Among women from 35 to 50 years of age, 61% have undergone at least one mammography during their life; 25.6% had undergone a screening mammogram within the last three years. Whatever women's age or indications, the gynecologist was the first physician to prescribe mammography. Logistic regression model adjusting for multiple variables was used to examine factors associated with women who underwent a screening mammography within the last three years. Women more likely to be screened were 45 to 50 years of age (vs 35-40 years of age: adjusted OR 8.9, 95% CI: 7.2 to 11.2), had higher educational level (adjusted OR 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1 to 1.5), had family history of breast cancer (adjusted OR 2.7, 95% CI: 2.1 to 3.4), and used routine gynecologic care (adjusted OR 1.9, 95% CI: 1.6 to 2.4). Individual screening by mammography very often occurs after 40 years, Such behaviors may lead public health professionals to question current recommendations for breast cancer mass screening in women 50 years of age and older.
    Journal de Gynécologie Obstétrique et Biologie de la Reproduction 01/1999; 27(8):765-71. · 0.45 Impact Factor