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Publications (9)75.32 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Factor XI (FXI) deficiency is a rare inherited bleeding disorder invariably caused by mutations in the FXI gene. The disorder is rather frequent in Ashkenazi Jews, in whom around 98% of the abnormal alleles is represented by Glu117X and Phe283Leu mutations. A wide heterogeneity of causative mutations has been previously reported in a few FXI deficient patients from Italy. In this article, we enlarge the knowledge on the genetic background of FXI deficiency in Italy. Over 4 years, 22 index cases, eight with severe deficiency and 14 with partial deficiency, have been evaluated. A total of 21 different mutations in 30 disease-associated alleles were identified, 10 of which were novel. Among them, a novel Asp556Gly dysfunctional mutation was also identified. Glu117X was also detected, as previously reported from other patients in Italy, while again Phe283Leu was not identified. A total of 34 heterozygous relatives were also identified. Bleeding tendency was present in very few cases, being inconsistently related to the severity of FXI deficiency in plasma. In conclusion, at variance with other populations, no single major founder effect is present in Italian patients with FXI deficiency.
    Haemophilia 09/2013; · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed at exploring the hematologists' internal representation of a difficult encounter with a hemophilic patient, using a written open format. Narrations were analyzed with Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Three main issues were identified, each with sub-issues: (1) Inside the relationship: to tell or not to tell, the balance between a normal life and a deviant medical condition, the guilt; (2) The borders of the professional role: professional values, the "do-it-all" doctor; and (3) The existential confrontation. This study reveals the deep involvement of physicians with their patients, at a professional level and, strongly, at a personal level. The experience of being so deeply involved should be considered in the continuing medical programs for physicians dealing with hemophilia.
    Journal of Health Psychology 07/2013; · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with haemophilia A and inhibitors are at high risk for severe bleeding, progression of joint disease and deterioration of health-related quality of life (HRQoL). To determine the impact of prophylaxis with an activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC) on HRQoL, HRQoL was assessed using the Short-Form (SF)-36 Health Survey and the EQ-5D questionnaire in subjects ≥14 years participating in a prospective, randomized, crossover study comparing 6 months of aPCC prophylaxis with 6 months of on-demand therapy. Eighteen of 19 patients completed the survey or questionnaire before and after the on-demand therapy and prophylaxis periods. A general trend towards improved HRQoL after prophylaxis was observed for the 18 evaluable patients in all SF-36 dimensions except for vitality/energy and physical functioning. After prophylaxis, 'good responders,' defined as patients experiencing ≥50% reduction in bleeding, exhibited statistically and clinically significant differences in the physical component score (P = 0.021), role - physical (P = 0.042), bodily pain (P = 0.015), and social functioning (P = 0.036). Similarly, the EQ-5D health profile showed a trend towards improvement after prophylaxis in all evaluable patients. Among the good responders, improvements did not differ from those observed after on-demand treatment. EQ visual analogue scale values were slightly improved following prophylaxis for all evaluable patients and the EQ-5D utility index improved in the good responders only. During prophylaxis, patients missed significantly fewer days from school or work because of bleeding than during on-demand treatment (P = 0.01). In conclusion, by significantly reducing bleeding frequency in good responders, aPCC prophylaxis improved HRQoL compared with on-demand treatment.
    Haemophilia 06/2013; · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Von Willebrand disease (VWD) is an inherited bleeding disorder caused by the quantitative or qualitative deficiency of von Willebrand factor (VWF). Replacement therapy with plasma-derived VWF/factor VIII (FVIII) concentrates is required in patients unresponsive to desmopressin. To assess the efficacy, safety and ease of use of a new, volume-reduced (VR) formulation of VWF/FVIII concentrate Haemate(®) P in patients requiring treatment for bleeding or prophylaxis for recurrent bleeding or for invasive procedures. Pharmacoeconomic variables were also recorded. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. This was a multicentre, prospective, observational study. Consecutively enrolled patients received Haemate(®) P VR according to their needs, and were followed for 24 months. Of the 121 patients enrolled, 25.6% had type 3 VWD and more than 40% had severe disease. All patients were followed for 2 years, for a total of 521 visits. On-demand treatment was given to 61.9% of patients, secondary long-term prophylaxis to 25.6% and prophylaxis for surgery, dental or invasive procedures to 45.5%. The response to treatment was rated as good to excellent in >93-99% of interventions. The new formulation was well tolerated by all patients with no report of drug-related adverse events. The switch to volume-reduced Haemate(®) P was easy to perform and infusion duration was decreased twofold compared with the previous formulation. Volume-reduced Haemate(®) P was at least as effective and well-tolerated as the previous formulation.
    Haemophilia 09/2012; · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Acquired haemophilia A (AHA) is a rare and serious disorder mainly affecting elderly patients. It is caused by the production of autoantibodies directed against coagulation factors; patients present with spontaneous bleeding, potentially fatal, in the absence of familial or personal history. Autoimmune disorders, infections, solid and hematologic tumors, and drugs are predisposing factors, but up to 50 percent of cases remain unexplained. The diagnosis of AHA is confirmed by specific laboratory tests; and the therapy is a clinical challenge, due to the fact that older patients are often affected by comorbidities. By passing agents may be used when persistent bleeding or haemodynamic instability is observed; corticosteroids, alone or with immunosuppressive therapy, are necessary to inhibit the production of the autoantibodies. We describe a case in which steroids in monotherapy successfully, safely, and persistently inhibited the production of anti-Factor VIII antibodies, in an old patient admitted after rheumatologic consult.
    Case reports in rheumatology. 01/2012; 2012:310730.
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with severe hemophilia A and factor VIII inhibitors are at increased risk for serious bleeding complications and progression to end-stage joint disease. Effective strategies to prevent bleeding in such patients have not yet been established. We enrolled patients with hemophilia A who were older than 2 years of age, had high-titer inhibitors, and used concentrates known as bypassing agents for bleeding in a prospective, randomized, crossover study comparing 6 months of anti-inhibitor coagulant complex (AICC), infused prophylactically at a target dose of 85 U per kilogram of body weight (±15%) on 3 nonconsecutive days per week, with 6 months of on-demand therapy (AICC at a target dose of 85 U per kilogram [±15%] used for bleeding episodes). The two treatment periods were separated by a 3-month washout period, during which patients received on-demand therapy for bleeding. The primary outcome was the number of bleeding episodes during each 6-month treatment period. Thirty-four patients underwent randomization; 26 patients completed both treatment periods and could be evaluated per protocol for the efficacy analysis. As compared with on-demand therapy, prophylaxis was associated with a 62% reduction in all bleeding episodes (P<0.001), a 61% reduction in hemarthroses (P<0.001), and a 72% reduction in target-joint bleeding (≥3 hemarthroses in a single joint during a 6-month treatment period) (P<0.001). Thirty-three randomly assigned patients received at least one infusion of the study drug and were evaluated for safety. One patient had an allergic reaction to the study drug. AICC prophylaxis at the dosage evaluated significantly and safely decreased the frequency of joint and other bleeding events in patients with severe hemophilia A and factor VIII inhibitors. (Funded by Baxter BioScience; Pro-FEIBA ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00221195.).
    New England Journal of Medicine 11/2011; 365(18):1684-92. · 54.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: SUMMARY: Haemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by a lack or decrease of coagulation factor VIII activity. The molecular diagnosis of HA is challenging and a variety of different mutations have been identified throughout the F8 gene. Our aim was to detect the causative mutation in 266 HA patients from Emilia-Romagna region (Italy) and in all suspected carriers. Molecular analysis of F8 in 201 HA patients (152 index cases) was performed with a combination of several indirect and direct molecular approaches, such as long distance polymerase chain reaction, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. The analysis revealed 78 different mutations, 23 of which were novel, not having been reported in national or international databases. The detection rate was 100%, 86% and 89% in patients with severe, moderate and mild HA, respectively. The information provided by this registry will be helpful for monitoring the treatment of HA patients in Emilia-Romagna and also for reliable genetic counselling of affected families in the future.
    Haemophilia 03/2010; 16(5):791-800. · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although a number of studies have analysed so far the causes of death and the life expectancy in haemophilic populations, no investigations have been conducted among Italian haemophilia centres. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate mortality, causes of deaths, life expectancy and co-morbidities in Italian persons with haemophilia (PWH). Data pertaining to a total of 443 PWH who died between 1980 and 2007 were retrospectively collected in the 30 centres who are members of the Italian Association of Haemophilia Centres that chose to participate. The mortality rate ratio standardized to the male Italian population (SMR) was reduced during the periods 1990-1999 and 2000-2007 such that during the latter, death rate overlapped that of the general population (SMR 1990-1999: 1.98 95% CI 1.54-2.51; SMR 2000-2007: 1.08 95% CI 0.83-1.40). Similarly, life expectancy in the whole haemophilic population increased in the same period (71.2 years in 2000-2007 vs. 64.0 in 1990-1999), approaching that of the general male population. While human immunodeficiency virus infection was the main cause of death (45%), 13% of deaths were caused by hepatitis C-associated complications. The results of this retrospective study show that in Italian PWH improvements in the quality of treatment and global medical care provided by specialized haemophilia centres resulted in a significantly increased life expectancy.
    Haemophilia 02/2010; 16(3):437-46. · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A Registry of inherited bleeding disorders was set up in the Region of Emilia-Romagna (RER) to collect information about these diseases and to improve the quality of care. From January 2003, the eight Haemophilia Centres (HC) in the RER began to use computerized clinical records; every 6 months, they send data to Parma Hospital to be processed and published in a website (http://www.registroemofiliarer.it). Great efforts are made to ensure high quality of data. Results of general interest are included in a free 'public area' and more sensitive data in a 'reserved area' (open only to HC and to health authorities). A total of 610 individuals are included: 249 haemophilia A (HA), 63 haemophilia B (HB), 173 von Willebrand's disease, 69 rare bleeding disorders, seven platelet disorders and 49 haemophilia carriers; 131 were genotyped, 188 were tested for inhibitors (16 affected). The most frequent bleeding was haemarthrosis. The joint score (evaluated in 104 haemophiliacs) was higher in severe HA. There were 22 HIV-positive and 182 hepatitis C virus-positive patients (21% have chronic hepatitis, two hepatocellular carcinoma). In 2005, two patients received primary prophylaxis, 47 secondary prophylaxis, four children were on immune-tolerance induction. From 2003 to 2005 the use of recombinant products was greatly increased and the majority of patients received them. The mean clotting factor consumption for prophylaxis was higher than on-demand treatment. The main features of registry are to collect high quality and comprehensive data of all patients followed by HC, to improve quality of care and it's availability on the web.
    Haemophilia 04/2008; 14(2):343-54. · 3.17 Impact Factor