Ann-Charlotte Laska

Danderyds Sjukhus AB, Tukholma, Stockholm, Sweden

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Publications (2)2.63 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to describe the impact of heart failure and of stroke with aphasia on quality of life (QoL) and to compare the different domains of QoL in these groups. The prevalence of chronic conditions has increased during the last decades, and chronic diseases such as stroke and heart failure may have a great impact on QoL. Comparative study of patients from two randomised controlled studies. Seventy-nine patients with heart failure and 70 patients with aphasia after stroke were evaluated concerning the severity of their disease and by QoL, as measured with the Nottingham Health Profile, in the acute phase and after six months. The severity of the disease improved between baseline and six month for both groups. Correlations between New York Heart Association (NYHA) class and all QoL domains were seen in patients with heart failure after six months. The degree of aphasia correlated to mobility, social, emotional and total score after six month. QoL in patients with heart failure was more affected in the domains of sleep and energy in the acute phase and in the energy domain at six months. Although low energy is more frequent among patients with heart failure, both groups report poor QoL. Improvement in severity of the disease is not necessarily accompanied by improvement in QoL. Nottingham Health Profile can easily be used as a screening instrument, aiming to identify patients at risk for adverse effects on QoL. A better understanding of the subjective QoL of patients with chronic disease is fundamental for health care professionals to be able to identify and support vulnerable patients.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 07/2010; 19(13-14):1855-60. · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to examine predictors of the life situation of the significant other of depressed or aphasic stroke patients. Depression and aphasia are common consequences of stroke, and both may put pressure on the significant other who have to deal not only with a possible physical handicap but also with communication and/or serious psychiatric difficulties. Descriptive, cross-sectional study. The participants were significant others of 71 depressed and 77 aphasic stroke patients. Depression was diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder, and degree of aphasia was diagnosed with the Amsterdam Nijmegen Everyday Language Test. Assessments of the life situation, state of depression and aggression, personality change and need of assistance were made through questionnaires issued to the significant others. Perceived need of assistance was the only common predictor of life situation of the significant other in both groups (p < 0.001). With respect to the aphasic patients, perceived personality change (p < 0.001) and living with the patient (p = 0.004) were factors that had a negative effect on the life situation of the significant other. This study highlights that the perception of the patient's need of assistance is an important factor in predicting the life situation among spouses of depressed as well as aphasic stroke patients. A comparison of the two groups to explain the life situation of the significant others revealed greater explanatory power for the aphasic group. Assessments of the spouses' perception as well as of the patients' factual situation may identify those significant others at risk. With this new approach, necessary steps may be taken to alleviate pressure on the significant other.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 06/2008; 17(12):1574-80. · 1.32 Impact Factor