Ali Altug Bicakci

Cumhuriyet University, Megalopolis, Sivas, Turkey

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Publications (17)21.1 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on reducing post-adjustment orthodontic pain via evaluation of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) composition changes at the level of prostaglandin-E(2) (PGE(2)) and visual analogue scale (VAS). LLLT has been found to be effective in pain relief. PGE(2) has the greatest impact on the process of pain signals and can be detected in GCF in order to investigate the response of dental and periodontal tissues in a biochemical manner. Nineteen patients (11 females and 8 males; mean age 13.9 years) were included in this study. Maxillary first molars were banded and then a randomly selected first molar at one side was irradiated (λ820 nm; continuous wave; output power: 50 mW; focal spot: 0.0314 cm(2); exposure duration: 5 sec; power density: 1.59 W/cm(2); energy dose: 0.25 J; energy density: 7.96 J/cm(2) for each shot), while the molar at the other side was served as placebo control. The GCF was collected from the gingival crevice of each molar to evaluate PGE(2) levels, before band placement, 1 and 24 h after laser irradiation. Pain intensity was analyzed at 5 min, 1 h, and 24 h after band placement by using VAS. Although no difference was found in pain perception at 5 min and 1 h, significant reduction was observed with laser treatment 24 h after application (p<0.05). The mean PGE(2) levels were significantly elevated in control group, whereas a gradual decrease occurred in laser group. The difference in PGE(2) levels at both 1 and 24 h were statistically significant between two groups (p<0.05). The significant reductions in both pain intensity and PGE(2) levels revealed that LLLT was efficient in reducing orthodontic post-adjustment pain.
    Photomedicine and laser surgery 07/2012; 30(8):460-5. · 1.76 Impact Factor
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    Ali Altug Bicakci, Cenk Doruk, Hasan Babacan
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    ABSTRACT: In this report, we present the case of a girl with delayed odontogenesis of a lower second premolar for which she was followed up for 8.5 years. Congenital absence of permanent mandibular second premolars was observed at the initial radiographic examination at 8 years and 1 month. One year later, during the treatment period, an unexpected odontogenesis of a right second premolar was diagnosed on follow-up radiography. The original treatment plan was revised and a new plan was successfully implemented. Th is unusual case showed that the orthodontist's clinical philosophy must be flexible because unexpected situations can arise, especially when treating growing patients.
    Korean Journal of Orthodontics 04/2012; 42(2):94-8. · 0.54 Impact Factor
  • Hasan Babacan, Cenk Doruk, A Altug Bicakci
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the pulpal blood flow (PBF) changes in anchorage teeth associated with the high forces of a rapid maxillary expansion (RME) appliance. The study was performed with 14 girls and 7 boys for a total of 21 patients between 10 and 15 years of age (mean, 13.1 +/- 1.39 years). A modified acrylic bonded RME appliance was used as an expansion appliance. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used for the pulpal perfusion measurements. Records were taken from 42 upper central incisors, 28 canines, and 42 first molars at the following time intervals: just before expansion (T1); at the first week of expansion (T2); at the end of the expansion process (T3); and at the third (T4), seventh (T5), and 12th weeks of retention (T6). The data gained were statistically evaluated by parametric tests. PBF values of the anchorage teeth were doubled at the first week of expansion; however, these values began to decrease because of separation of the median palatal suture. PBF values tended to reach their initial values during the retention period. Pulpal perfusion changes of all examined anchorage teeth were similar to each other from the beginning to the end of the evaluation. PBF changes that occur with RME are reversible.
    The Angle Orthodontist 11/2010; 80(6):1136-40. · 1.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The aim of this prospective in-vivo study was to investigate the possible effects of temperature changes from various adhesive cleanup procedures on pulpal tissue. METHODS: The materials, consisting of 40 sound maxillary and mandibular premolars to be extracted during orthodontic treatment, were randomly assigned to 4 groups, with 1 group as the control. The teeth in the 3 study groups were etched; brackets were bonded and then debonded. The remaining adhesive was removed with a tungsten carbide bur by using a high-speed hand piece. The teeth in the control group were not etched and bonded. In group 1, the residual adhesive was removed with water cooling, and the teeth were extracted 24 hours later. In group 2, the residual adhesive was removed without water cooling, and the teeth were extracted 24 hours later. In group 3, the residual adhesive was removed without water cooling, and the teeth were extracted 20 days later. The teeth were prepared for histologic examination, and the number of vessels, vessel areas and perimeters, extravasation of red blood cells, vascular congestion, and inflammatory cell infiltration were evaluated to determine pulpal tissue changes. RESULTS: According to the findings from histologic and immunohistochemical evaluations, the coronal pulps of the teeth in groups 1 and 3 were almost similar to the control teeth, but some distinct pathologic changes were observed in group 2. CONCLUSIONS: Adhesive removal without water cooling caused some vascular and pulpal tissue alterations, but these were tolerated by the pulpal tissues, so the changes were reversible.
    American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics 07/2010; 138(1):12-13. · 1.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this prospective in-vivo study was to investigate the possible effects of temperature changes from various adhesive cleanup procedures on pulpal tissue. The materials, consisting of 40 sound maxillary and mandibular premolars to be extracted during orthodontic treatment, were randomly assigned to 4 groups, with 1 group as the control. The teeth in the 3 study groups were etched; brackets were bonded and then debonded. The remaining adhesive was removed with a tungsten carbide bur by using a high-speed hand piece. The teeth in the control group were not etched and bonded. In group 1, the residual adhesive was removed with water cooling, and the teeth were extracted 24 hours later. In group 2, the residual adhesive was removed without water cooling, and the teeth were extracted 24 hours later. In group 3, the residual adhesive was removed without water cooling, and the teeth were extracted 20 days later. The teeth were prepared for histologic examination, and the number of vessels, vessel areas and perimeters, extravasation of red blood cells, vascular congestion, and inflammatory cell infiltration were evaluated to determine pulpal tissue changes. According to the findings from histologic and immunohistochemical evaluations, the coronal pulps of the teeth in groups 1 and 3 were almost similar to the control teeth, but some distinct pathologic changes were observed in group 2. Adhesive removal without water cooling caused some vascular and pulpal tissue alterations, but these were tolerated by the pulpal tissues, so the changes were reversible.
    American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics 07/2010; 138(1):12.e1-7; discussion 12-3. · 1.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the effects of rapid maxillary expansion (RME) and surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) on dentoalveolar structures following orthodontic treatment, as well as stability at 2-year follow-up. Two groups of subjects were used in the study. Group 1 consisted of 14 subjects (mean age, 12.7 +/- 1.4 years) who were treated with RME, and Group 2 consisted of 13 subjects (mean age, 18.5 +/- 2.3 years) who were treated with SARME. In both groups, all cases had a maxillary width deficiency with bilateral crossbites. Maxillary dental casts were available at three different intervals: pretreatment (T1), after orthodontic treatment (T2), and at follow-up recall (T3). Intermolar and interpremolar width, palatal height, and maxillary arch depth and length were assessed from maxillary dental casts. Treatment by RME and SARME produced significant increases in intermolar and interpremolar width and maxillary arch length after expansion (T2) (P < .05). The amount of relapse was not significantly different 2 years after treatment (P > .05). Although age ranges of the patient groups are different, the dentoalveolar responses of RME and SARME were similar after orthodontic treatment.
    The Angle Orthodontist 03/2009; 79(2):207-13. · 1.18 Impact Factor
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    Hasan Babacan, Banu Kiliç, Altuğ Biçakçi
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    ABSTRACT: Maxillary canine premolar transposition is the most frequently reported transposition type, which many orthodontists face. Although correcting the transposed tooth order is not advised after the eruption of the permanent tooth, several articles published in the last decade demonstrated nonextraction treatment of transposition using fixed mechanics. This article describes the nonextraction treatment of a complete transposition between a maxillary left canine and a first premolar, using similar mechanics as suggested earlier. The correct tooth order was established with a functional Class I canine and molar relationship at the end of treatment. Although triangular cortical bone resorption at the vestibule of the canine root was detected on computed tomography at the end of treatment, spontaneous regeneration of bone tissue at the resorption area was present on the postretention computed tomography scan.
    The Angle Orthodontist 10/2008; 78(5):954-60. · 1.18 Impact Factor
  • Oral Sökücü, Firat Oztürk, Hasan Babacan, Ali Altuğ Biçakçi
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    ABSTRACT: To test the hypothesis that there is no difference in the movement of the upper third molars between rapid maxillary expansion (RME) and non-RME patients. This study was performed on 30 patients divided into two groups. The study group included 20 patients who had maxillary narrowness and bilateral maxillary third molars and who had undergone RME application. The control group of 10 patients had a bilateral crossbite, had bilateral maxillary third molars, and did not receive orthodontic treatment. The records included lateral and frontal cephalometric films and maxillary plaster models. In the study group, records were taken before expansion (T1), after expansion (T2), and at the retention period (T3). T2 records were not taken in the control group because this period was too short to observe any changes. Friedman tests were used to observe within groups, and the Mann-Whitney U-test was used to see the differences between groups on films and casts. Frontal films showed that vertical eruption occurred after the retention period in the RME cases. Cephalometric films revealed that the angular eruption occurred immediately after expansion. However, the results were not significant with respect to the control group. The hypothesis was rejected. Rapid maxillary expansion affects maxillary third molar movement during and after the RME procedure. RME may indicate upper third molar eruption, but the final position of third molar was not different compared to the normal growth pattern.
    The Angle Orthodontist 04/2008; 78(2):195-200. · 1.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to compare nasal volume changes using acoustic rhinometry (AR) and computed tomography (CT). The subjects were 10 children (6 girls and 4 boys, with an age range of 12-14 years) who required rapid maxillary expansion (RME) on the basis of their individual malocclusion. All patients were found to have normal nasal cavities following anterior rhinoscopic examination. AR and CT were undertaken at the start of treatment (t(1)) and 6 months after expansion (t(2)). Volume changes due to expansion were evaluated using Wilcoxon's test, and the correlation between the two methods was assessed with correlation analyses. Both methods demonstrated that nasal volume significantly increased following the use of RME (P<0.05). Correlation analyses showed no difference in volume (P>0.05) using either of the two methods.
    The European Journal of Orthodontics 06/2007; 29(3):251-5. · 1.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To test the hypothesis that there is a relationship between forward mandibular third molar migration and root curvature of the mandibular third molars. The study is comprised of 64 patients who had a history of unilateral mandibular first molar extraction before 16 years of age with no other missing teeth or prosthetic restorations in the mandible. The extraction space was fully or partly closed. The mean remaining space was 1.1 +/- 0.41 mm. The root angles for the mesial and distal roots of the mandibular third molars were measured on the panoramic radiographs by calculating the differences between the angle formed by the long axis drawn perpendicular to the occlusal plane of the crown of mandibular third molar and the central line of the lower one ninth of the root through the root apex. The differences between the extracted and nonextracted sides for mesial and distal roots were analyzed using a paired sample t-test. Both mesial and distal roots were approximately 8 degrees more vertical on the extraction sides than on the nonextraction sides. The differences were statistically significant. Mesial tooth migration of mandibular third molars reduces the amount of root curvature developing on this tooth.
    The Angle Orthodontist 02/2007; 77(1):73-6. · 1.18 Impact Factor
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    Cenk Doruk, Hasan Babacan, Altug Biçakçi
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    ABSTRACT: Early diagnosis of a transposition can simplify the orthodontic correction. In this report, we describe the orthodontic management of a patient with mandibular right lateral incisor and canine transposition. Nonextraction therapy was performed with removable multibracket appliances. Natural tooth order was attained, and a symmetric and functional Class I occlusion was achieved.
    American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics 02/2006; 129(1):65-72. · 1.46 Impact Factor
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    Sinan Ay, Ugur Agar, A Altug Biçakçi, H Hüseyin Köşger
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    ABSTRACT: Third molars often become impacted because of lack of space for their eruption. Because the third molars play an important role occlusally, premolars or second molars are sometimes extracted to create space. First molars are seldom extracted to create space, but they are occasionally extracted for other reasons, especially caries. The aim of this study was to investigate the spontaneous angular and positional changes in mandibular third molars when mandibular first molars are extracted. The sample consisted of panoramic radiographs of 107 patients (age, 18-40 years; mean, 25.69 years) who had unilateral mandibular first-molar extractions (because of caries) before age 16. Ramus relationship, impaction depth, and angulation of third molars on the extraction and nonextraction sides were assessed. A chi-square test was performed to compare the differences. The prevalence of third molars at the anterior border of the mandibular ramus was significantly greater on the extraction side than on the nonextraction side (P < .001). Third molars were positioned more occlusally in the mandible on the nonextraction side than on the extraction side (P < .001). The prevalence of vertically angulated third molars was greater on the extraction side than on the nonextraction side (P < .001). Mandibular first-molar extraction increases the space for mandibular third-molar eruption and helps the third molars move into better positions. But early extraction can lead to uncontrolled tipping of adjacent teeth into the extraction space. Only third-molar angle and position were evaluated in this study; problems such as dental asymmetry, premature contacts, and uncontrolled tipping should be assessed in the future.
    American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics 02/2006; 129(1):36-41. · 1.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to identify the role of psycho-social factors in headgear compliance. Fifty-one patients, with an Angle Class II division 1 malocclusion comprised the study sample. The treatment plan aimed to correct the malocclusion using cervical pull headgear. An electronic module timer was attached to the neckstrap to evaluate the number of hours the patients wore the headgear. One of their parents was asked to answer the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL), which defines a patient's behaviour. The patients were monitored for 6 months and the modules were measured at the end of each 2 month period. Mann-Whitney U and Chi square tests were used to analyse the data. The patients were separated into groups according to their compliance. The results showed that although there were significant differences in the use of headgear between the groups (P < or = 0.001), age, gender, and CBCL subgroup scores were not statistically significant (P > 0.05).
    The European Journal of Orthodontics 06/2005; 27(3):263-7. · 1.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of rapid maxillary expansion (RME) on nasal minimum cross-sectional area (MCA) using acoustic rhinometry (AR) in two groups of subjects who were treated before and after the pubertal growth spurt. The sample consisted of 29 patients with maxillary constriction and a control sample of 15 subjects. Both samples were divided into two groups according to individual skeletal maturation as assessed by the cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) method. Group I T (early-treated) consisted of 16 patients (eight girls and eight boys). Group I C (early-control) consisted of eight patients, and both groups had not reached the pubertal peak (CVM Stage 1-3). Group II T (late-treated) consisted of 13 patients (eight girls and five boys). Group II C (late-control) consisted of seven patients, and both groups were at a stage during or after the pubertal peak (CVM Stage 4-6). AR records were obtained for each treated subject before treatment (T1), after expansion (T2), and immediately after a three-month retention period (T3); only T1 and T3 records were obtained for controls. The overall increase in MCA was significantly greater in the early- and late-treated groups (group I T, group II T) as compared with the early and late controls. (group I C, group II C) (P < .05). The results of the present study suggest that even the overall (T1-T3) increase for MCA in group I T is greater (0.34 mm) than the increase for MCA in group II T (0.19 mm), but the difference was not significant (P > .05).
    The Angle Orthodontist 02/2005; 75(1):1-6. · 1.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the sagittal, transverse, and vertical effects of rapid maxillary expansion (RME) and fan-type RME on dentofacial structures. The study group consisted of 34 patients, 14 boys and 20 girls (average age 12.5 years), selected without considering their skeletal class and sex. The fan-type RME group comprised 17 subjects, who had an anterior constricted maxilla with a normal intermolar width. The RME group comprised 17 other subjects, who had a maxillary transverse discrepancy with a posterior crossbite. The records obtained for each patient included a lateral and a frontal cephalometric film, upper plaster models, and occlusal radiograph obtained before treatment (T1), after expansion (T2), and immediately after a three-month retention period (T3). The data obtained from the evaluation of the records before and after treatment, after treatment and after retention, and before treatment and after retention were compared using paired t-test. Further comparisons between the groups were made using Student's t-test. There was significantly greater expansion in the intercanine than in the intermolar width in the fan-type RME group as compared with the RME group. Downward and forward movement of the maxilla was observed in both groups. The upper incisors were tipped palatally in the RME group, but they were tipped labially in the fan-type RME group. There was significantly greater expansion in the nasal cavity and maxillary width in the RME group as opposed to the fan-type RME group.
    The Angle Orthodontist 05/2004; 74(2):184-94. · 1.18 Impact Factor
  • Cenk Doruk, Ali Altug Bicakci, Hasan Babacan
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    ABSTRACT: Incontinentia pigmenti is an uncommon, inherited disorder with predominantly ectodermal manifestations that is associated with skin (100%)), dental (90%), skeletal (40%), central nervous (40%), and ocular (35%) deformities. It is an X-linked dominant disease, usually lethal in males and occurring in female infants. The dental effects include delayed eruption, partial anodontia, microdontia, and cone or peg-shaped teeth. The dental, clinical, and radiological findings in a 16-year-old female are presented here. The patient had peg-shaped teeth and a unilateral maxillary transverse discrepancy associated with oligodontia in the maxillary and mandibular arches. Orthodontic treatment included rapid maxillary expansion and fixed orthodontic therapy for prosthetic purposes and elimination of the functional midline shift.
    The Angle Orthodontist 01/2004; 73(6):763-8. · 1.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Surgically assisted rapid palatal expansion is used for the management of transverse maxillary deficiency in the early permanent dentition. The success depends on the maintenance of an adequate blood supply to the mobilized segments. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of corticotomy and midline osteotomy on the tooth pulpal blood flow. Laser Doppler flowmetry was applied as a non-invasive and reliable technique for the assessment of pulpal blood flow in the maxillary centrals, canines and first molars. The blood flow was investigated pre- and postoperatively, on the first, third, and seventh postoperative days bilaterally in 13 cases. The results of this study indicate that ischaemia of the pulp can occur following osteotomy at the Le Fort I level. Corticotomy 5mm above the dental apices and separating the midpalatal suture did not have any serious effect on pulpal blood flow in this study.
    Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery 05/2003; 31(2):97-100. · 1.61 Impact Factor