Andréia Bolzan de Paula

University of Campinas, Conceição de Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil

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Publications (17)17.55 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the effects of chemical agents on the physical properties and structure of primary pulp chamber dentin using surface roughness, microhardness tests, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Twenty-five primary teeth were sectioned exposing the pulp chamber and were divided into five groups (n = 5): NT, no treatment; SH1, 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl); SH1U, 1% NaOCl + Endo-PTC®; SH1E, 1% NaOCl + 17% EDTA; and E, 17% EDTA. After dentin treatment, the specimens were submitted to roughness, microhardness testing, and SEM analysis. Roughness and microhardness data were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P < 0.05). The SH1E group showed the highest roughness, followed by the E group (P < 0.05) when compared with the NT, SH1, and SH1U groups. Microhardness values of SH1 and SH1U showed no significant difference as compared to the NT (control) group (P > 0.05). Microhardness values could not be obtained in the EDTA groups (SH1E and E). The presence of intertubular dentin with opened dentin tubules was observed in the NT, SH1, and SH1U groups. SH1E showed eroded and disorganized dentin with few opened tubules and the intertubular/peritubular dentin was partially removed. Considering the physical and structural approaches and the chemical agents studied, it can be concluded that NaOCl and NaOCl associated with Endo-PTC® were the agents that promoted the smallest changes in surface roughness, microhardness, and structure of the pulp chamber dentin of primary teeth.
    Microscopy Research and Technique 01/2014; 77(1):52-6. · 1.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate in the laboratory the roughness (Ra) and micromorphology surface of the nanofilled resin-modified glass-ionomer (Ketac N100) subjected to biomechanical degradation, compared to Vitremer, Ketac Molar Easymix and Fuji IX. Specimens obtained from the ionomers were divided into two storage groups (n = 10): relative humidity and S. mutans biofilm (biodegradation). After 7 days, Ra values and micrographs were obtained. Then, the brushing abrasion test (mechanical degradation) was conducted with dentifrice slurry (three-body) and the specimens were reassessed. Data were submitted to repeated measures three-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (P < 0.05). There was significant interaction among the factors: material, storage and abrasion (before/after). Vitremer showed similar Ra values between storage groups, while the other materials presented higher Ra values after biodegradation test. Concerning biomechanical challenge, Ketac N100 presented the lowest Ra values. Ketac Molar Easymix and Fuji IX presented undesirable roughening of their surfaces under the detrimental conditions tested. The eroded aspect after biodegradation with filler exposure after mechanical degradation was evident.
    American journal of dentistry 12/2012; 25(6):315-20. · 1.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To evaluate: 1) the in vitro antibacterial, cytotoxic and mechanical properties of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) containing different concentrations of chlorhexidine (CHX) and 2) the in vivo microbiologic action of the best concentration of CHX associated with the RMGIC applied on remaining dentin after indirect pulp treatment (IPT). METHODS: For the in vitro studies, RMGIC was associated with 0.2, 0.5, 1.25 and 2.5% CHX. Microbiologic evaluation consisted of an agar diffusion test on cariogenic bacteria for 24h. Odontoblast-like cell metabolism and morphology analyses measured the cytotoxic effects of the RMGIC groups after 24h. The same groups were submitted to compressive and diametral tensile strength. The in vivo treatment consisted of IPT using an RMGIC associated with the best CHX concentration. Clinical and microbiologic evaluations were performed before and after 3 months. RESULTS: The use of 1.25% CHX significantly improved the antibacterial effects of the evaluated RMGIC, without causing any detrimental effects to the odontoblast-like cells and on the mechanical properties. This RMGIC and CHX combination completely eliminated mutans streptococci after 3 months of IPT. CONCLUSION: The RMGIC and 1.25% CHX mixture showed great biological and mechanical behavior and could be a good treatment against caries progression. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The association of CHX with a liner RMGIC opens a new perspective for arresting residual caries after IPT.
    Journal of dentistry 10/2012; · 3.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the influence of material combinations used in the resin coating technique (RCT) on the marginal adaptation of indirect restorations with gingival margins in enamel (EM) and cement (CM). Eighty third-molars were used. Two cavities were prepared in each tooth. The cavities were distributed into 16 groups. Cavities with EM were filled with the following material combinations: G1: Single-Bond 2 (Sb2), G2: Sb2 + Bond/Scotchbond-Multipurpose (Sb2B), G3: Sb2 + Filtek-Flow Z350 (Sb2Fl), G4: Scotchbond-Multipurpose (SBMP), G5: Clearfil-S3 (CS3), G6: CS3 + Bond/Clearfil-SE Bond (CSE3B), G7: CS3 + Protect Liner F (CS3PL) and G8: Clearfil SE Bond + Protect Liner F (CSEBPL). The same combinations were applied to the cavities in CM: G9, G10, G11, G12, G13, G14, G15, G16, respectively. The fillings were performed with the Sinfony-System (3M/ESPE). After 24 h, the teeth were submitted to thermocycling (2,000 cycles, 5° to 55°C) and load-cycling (50,000 cycles, 50 N). Next, the Caries-Detector (Kuraray) was applied to the restoration margins. Images from the proximal margin were evaluated using the Image-Tool 3.0 software. The results were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The mean values (%) for the groups were: EM: G1=46.68, G2=15.53, G3=19.83, G4=27.53; G5=59.49, G6=25.13, G7=34.37, G8=15.20; CM: G9=38.38, G10=23.25, G11=26.97, G12=25.85, G13=37.81, G14=30.62, G15=29.17, G16=20.31. The highest percentages of marginal gap on EM or CM were found in the groups that did not use a liner. It can be concluded that the most appropriate RCT combinations were the groups that used a liner.
    Brazilian dental journal 01/2012; 23(6):672-8.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to assess Knoop hardness at different depths of a dual-cured self-adhesive resin cement through different thicknesses of Empress Esthetic® ceramic.Flattened bovine dentin was embedded in resin. The cement was inserted into a rubber mold (0.8 x 5 mm) that was placed between two polyvinyl chloride plastic films and placed over the flat dentin and light cured by Elipar Trilight-QTH (800 mW/cm2) or Ultra-Lumelight-emitting diode (LED 5; 1585 mW/cm2) over ceramic disks 1.4 or 2 mm thick. The specimens(n=6) were stored for 24 hours before Knoop hardness (KHN) was measured. The data were submitted to analysis of variance in a factorial split-plot design and Tukey's test (a=0.05).There was significant interaction among the study factors. In the groups cured by the QTHunit, an increase in ceramic thickness resulted in reduced cement hardness values at all depths, with the highest values always being found in the center (1.4 mm, 58.1; 2 mm, 50.1)and the lowest values at the bottom (1.4 mm,23.8; 2 mm, 20.2). When using the LED unit, the hardness values diminished with increased ceramic thickness only on the top (1.4 mm,51.5; 2 mm, 42.3). In the group with the 1.4-mm-thick disk, the LED curing unit resulted in similar values on the top (51.5) and center(51.9) and lower values on the bottom (24.2).However, when the cement was light cured through the 2-mm disk, the highest hardness value was obtained in the center (51.8), followed by the top (42.3) and bottom (19.9),results similar to those obtained with the QTH curing unit (center > top > bottom). The hardness values of the studied cement at different depths were dependent on the ceramic thickness but not on the light curing units used.
    Operative Dentistry 12/2011; 37(2):188-94. · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical degradation of two nanofilled restorative materials (a resin-modified glass ionomer, Ketac N100 and a composite, Filtek Z350), compared with conventional materials (Vitremer and TPH Spectrum). Twenty specimens obtained from each material were divided into two storage groups (n=10): relative humidity (control) and Streptococcus mutans biofilm (biodegradation). After 7 days of storage, roughness values (Ra) and micrographs by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were obtained. In a second experimental phase, the specimens previously subjected to biodegradation were fixed to the tooth-brushing device and abraded via toothbrushes, using dentifrice slurry (mechanical degradation). Next, these specimens were washed, dried, and reassessed by roughness and SEM. The data were submitted to repeated measures three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests (p<0.05). There was statistically significant interaction among factors: material, storage (humidity/biofilm), and abrasion (before/after). After biodegradation (S mutans biofilm storage), Ketac N100 presented the highest Ra values. Concerning bio plus mechanical challenge, TPH Spectrum, Ketac N100, and Vitremer presented the undesirable roughening of their surfaces, while the nano composite Filtek Z350 exhibited the best resistance to cumulative challenges proposed. The degraded aspect after biodegradation and the exposure of fillers after mechanical degradation were visualized in micrographs. This study demonstrated that the nanotechnology incorporated in restorative materials, as in composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer, was important for the superior resistance to biomechanical degradation.
    Operative Dentistry 09/2011; 36(6):670-7. · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To characterize the mechanical and biological properties of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) containing doxycycline hyclate. The antibacterial effect of RMGIC containing 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5% doxycycline hyclate was assessed using two experiments - agar diffusion test for 24h and biofilm assay for 24h and 7 days - against some cariogenic bacteria. Briefly, base layers of BHI agar and 300μL of each inoculum were prepared in Petri dishes with 6 wells that were completely filled with materials. After 24h incubation, zones of bacterial growth inhibition were measured using a digital caliper. Biofilm assays were conducted using RMGIC specimens immersed in 24-well plates containing the inoculum in BHI broth. After 24h and 7 days, each specimen were removed, vortexed and the suspension diluted and inoculated in BHI plates for subsequent bacterial counting. Cytotoxicity tests used 50 specimens made in sterilized metal molds, including Vitrebond as positive control. Extracts from every specimen were applied on the MDPC-23 odontoblast-like cells for 24h. The MTT assay and SEM evaluation determined cell metabolism and morphology, respectively. 80 cylindrical specimens were made from the previously cited groups, and were submitted to testing with a universal testing machine (Instron 4411) using a crosshead speed of 1.0mm/min for compressive strength and 0.5mm/min for diametral tensile strength, respectively. Data from antibacterial and cytotoxic effects, and mechanical properties were submitted to appropriated statistical tests. All tested groups showed growth inhibition of all tested strains (p<0.05) in 24h for both microbiological tests, but only 4.5% doxycycline have antibacterial effect after 7 days. None of doxycycline concentrations caused toxic effect to the MDPC-23 cells or presenting alterations to mechanical properties. The incorporation of up to 4.5% doxycycline hyclate into RMGIC inhibits important oral microorganisms, without modifying biological and mechanical characteristics of the dental material, suggesting a new alternative for the treatment of dental caries.
    Archives of oral biology 09/2011; 57(2):131-8. · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to compare the in situ and in vitro performances of a laser fluorescence (LF) device (DIAGNOdent 2095) with visual inspection for the detection of occlusal caries in permanent teeth. Sixty-four sites were selected, and visual inspection and LF assessments were carried out, in vitro, three times by two independent examiners, with a 1-week interval between evaluations. Afterwards, the occlusal surfaces were mounted on the palatal portion of removable acrylic orthodontic appliances and placed in six volunteers. Assessments were repeated and validated by histological analysis of the tooth sections under a stereomicroscope. For both examiners, the highest intra-examiner values were observed for the visual inspection when in vitro and in situ evaluations were compared. The inter-examiner reproducibility varied from 0.61 to 0.64, except for the in vitro assessment using LF, which presented a lower value (0.43). The methods showed high specificity at the D1 threshold (considering enamel and dentin caries as disease). In vitro evaluations showed the highest values of sensitivity for both methods when compared to the in situ evaluations at D1 and D2 (considering only dentinal caries as the disease) thresholds. For both methods, the results of sensitivity (at D1 and D2) and accuracy (at D1) showed significant differences between in vitro and in situ conditions. However, the sensitivity (at D1 and D2), specificity and accuracy (both at D1) of the methods were not significantly different when the same condition was considered. It can be concluded that visual inspection and LF showed better performance in vitro than in situ. KeywordsLaser fluorescence-DIAGNOdent-Caries detection-Visual inspection-Occlusal caries
    Lasers in Medical Science 01/2011; 26(1):1-5. · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the Knoop hardness and polymerization depth of a dual-cured resin cement, light-activated at different distances through different thicknesses of composite resin. One bovine incisor was embedded in resin and its buccal surface was flattened. Dentin was covered with PVC film where a mold (0.8-mm-thick and 5 mm diameter) was filled with cement and covered with another PVC film. Light curing (40 s) was carried out through resin discs (2, 3, 4 or 5 mm) with a halogen light positioned 0, 1, 2 or 3 mm from the resin surface. After storage, specimens were sectioned for hardness measurements (top, center, and bottom). Data were subjected to split-plot ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). The increase in resin disc thickness decreased cement hardness. The increase in the distance of the light-curing tip decreased hardness at the top region. Specimens showed the lowest hardness values at the bottom, and the highest at the center. Resin cement hardness was influenced by the thickness of the indirect restoration and by the distance between the light-curing unit tip and the resin cement surface.
    Brazilian dental journal 01/2010; 21(2):117-22.
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the effect of different light energy densities on conversion degree (CD) and Knoop hardness number (KHN) of RelyX ARC (RLX) resin cement. After manipulation according to the manufacturer's instructions, RLX was inserted into a rubber mold (0.8 mm x 5 mm) and covered with a Mylar strip. The tip of the light-curing unit (LCU) was positioned in contact with the Mylar surface. Quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) and light-emitting diode (LED) LCUs with light densities of 10, 20 and 30 J/cm2 were used to light-cure the specimens. After light curing, the specimens were stored dry in lightproof containers at 37 degrees C. After 24 hours, the CD was analyzed by FT-Raman and, after an additional 24-hours, samples were submitted to Knoop hardness testing. The data of the CD (%) and KHN were submitted to two-way ANOVA and the Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). QTH and LED were effective light curing units. For QTH, there were no differences among the light energy densities for CD or KHN. For LED, there was a significant reduction in CD with the light energy density set at 10 J/cm2. KHN was not influenced by the light-curing unit and by its light energy density.
    Operative Dentistry 01/2010; 35(1):120-4. · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this in vivo study was to evaluate the performance of laser fluorescence (LF) comparing different cut-off limits for occlusal caries detection. One hundred and thirty first permanent molars were selected. Visual examination and LF assessments were performed independently. The extent of caries was assessed after operative intervention. New cut-off limits were established and compared with those proposed by the manufacturer and by Lussi et al. (Eur J Oral Sci 109:14-19, 2001). Similar sensitivity and higher specificity was found at D(2) (considering as disease only dentin caries) when the LF cut-off limits proposed by Lussi et al. and the new one were compared. At the D(3) threshold (considering as disease only deep dentin caries), no statistically significant difference among the cut-off limits for sensitivity was found. However, the new cut-off limits showed higher specificity. The LF device provided good ability to detect dentin caries lesions. Furthermore, the new cut-off limits and the values proposed by Lussi et al. could be suggested for the in vivo detection of occlusal caries.
    Lasers in Medical Science 04/2008; 24(3):295-300. · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the compressive strength and marginal adaptation of composite onlays using indirect and direct techniques after thermal and mechanical cycling. Onlay standardized cavities were prepared in 50 permanent molars and restored with Z-250 resin composite using indirect (IRT) or direct (DRT) restorative techniques. The restorations were either submitted or not submitted to thermal (500 cycles, 5 degrees to 55 degrees C) and mechanical cycling (50,000 cycles, 50N). The teeth were distributed to five groups (n=10): G1-IRT/cycling; G2-IRT/no cycling; G3-DRT/cycling; G4-DRT/no cycling and G5 (control group)-sound teeth. All prepared teeth were stored in 100% relative humidity at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, followed by finishing with Sof-Lex discs. A caries detector solution was applied on the tooth-restoration interface of all teeth for five seconds, followed by washing and drying. Four digital photographs were taken of each tooth surface. The extent of gaps was measured using standard software (Image Tool 3.0). All groups were submitted to compression testing in a universal testing machine (INSTRON) at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute until failure. The compressive strength (CS) and marginal adaptation data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). For both evaluation criteria (compressive strength and marginal adaptation), there were no statistically significant differences among the restorative techniques. Deterioration over time was observed for both types of restorations. However, the prevalence of catastrophic fractures increased among direct restorations. The application of thermal/mechanical cycling only influenced marginal adaptation.
    Operative Dentistry 01/2008; 33(4):434-40. · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This article is the first known case report of Fraser syndrome in the dental literature. Its purpose was to present the clinical manifestations, oral findings, and dental treatment of a 14-year, 10-month-old female patient. Fraser syndrome is a rare recessive autosomal genetic disorder characterized by multisystemic malformation, usually comprising cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and renal defects. The child presented with: (1) hydrocephaly; (2) face asymmetry; (3) low-inserted ears; (4) flat nose bridge; (5) cryptophthalmos; (6) bilateral absence of eyeballs; (7) hypertelorism; (8) syndactyly on the left fingers and toes; (9) skeletal defects; and (10) lower limb asymmetry. The intraoral examination revealed: (1) complete primary denture; (2) malocclusion; (3) tooth crowding; (4) ogival palate; (5) normal labial frena; (6) absence of lingual frenum (not compromising the tongue movements); (7) parched lips; (8) supragingival calculus adhered to all tooth surfaces; and (9) moderate gingivitis. The dental treatment consisted of periodic monitoring of the patient's oral health status and supragingival scaling associated with topical applications of 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate gel at 2-week intervals to reduce gingivitis.
    Journal of dentistry for children (Chicago, Ill.) 08/2007; 74(3):231-235.
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    ABSTRACT: This article is the first known case report of Fraser syndrome in the dental literature. Its purpose was to present the clinical manifestations, oral findings, and dental treatment of a 14-year, 10-month-old female patient. Fraser syndrome is a rare recessive autosomal genetic disorder characterized by multisystemic malformation, usually comprising cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, and renal defects. The child presented with: (1) hydrocephaly; (2) face asymmetry; (3) low-inserted ears; (4) flat nose bridge; (5) cryptophthalmos; (6) bilateral absence of eyeballs; (7) hypertelorism; (8) syndactyly on the left fingers and toes; (9) skeletal defects; and (10) lower limb asymmetry. The intraoral examination revealed: (1) complete primary denture; (2) malocclusion; (3) tooth crowding; (4) ogival palate; (5) normal labial frena; (6) absence of lingual frenum (not compromising the tongue movements); (7) parched lips; (8) supragingival calculus adhered to all tooth surfaces; and (9) moderate gingivitis. The dental treatment consisted of periodic monitoring of the patient's oral health status and supragingival scaling associated with topical applications of 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate gel at 2-week intervals to reduce gingivitis.
    Journal of dentistry for children (Chicago, Ill.) 01/2007; 74(3):231-5.
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the abrasive effect of different toothbrushes-soft-cross bristles (CB), extra-soft-parallel bristles (ES), and soft-parallel bristles (S)-on the surface roughness of conventional (C) and resin-modified (V) glass ionomer cements in vitro. Eight specimens of each material were prepared for each group: (1) V and CB; (2) V and ES; (3) V and S; (4) C and CB; (5) C and ES; and (6) C and S. Specimens were stored at 37 degrees C/24 hours and 100% humidity, polished, and initially analyzed with a surface roughness-measuring device. Next, they were fixed to the tooth-brushing device and abraded via toothbrushes, using a dentifrice slurry, performed at 250 cycles/minute with a 200 g load. The specimens were washed, dried, and analyzed identically with the same device. There was no significant interaction between material and toothbrush types. After tooth-brushing, V showed significantly higher surface roughness than C and CB and created higher surface roughness than S. No difference was observed between these toothbrushes and ES. Regardless of the toothbrush type used, resin-modified glass ionomer cement showed the highest roughness values.
    Journal of dentistry for children (Chicago, Ill.) 75(2):112-6.
  • Dental Materials. 28:e31.