Anna Green

Western Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

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Publications (3)1.9 Total impact

  • Anna Green, William Allison
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study is to explore nursing and medical staff's perceptions of a clinical marker referral tool implemented to assist in the early identification of unstable patients in the general surgical and medical ward environment. A descriptive, exploratory survey design was undertaken 6 months after the implementation of a clinical marker referral tool. The target population for the survey was all ward nursing, junior medical staff and intensive care unit (ICU) registrars in a metropolitan tertiary referral hospital in Australia. The survey consisted of open-ended and closed-ended questions, as well as statements asking participants to explore their perceptions, attitudes and perceived understanding of the clinical marker referral tool. The surveys were sent to all targeted staff in a personally addressed envelope via the internal mail system. Overall, nursing and medical staff (n = 178) responses were positive to the clinical marker project/tool, offering clear guidelines for staff to respond to the patient's clinical condition and contact the medical staff and the ICU liaison team as appropriate. Furthermore, comments were made in relation to the ICU liaison team acting as a ‘support’ and ‘prompt back-up’ for nursing staff when needed. However, ward medical staff had reservations with the clinical markers chosen and with ward nurses being able to contact the ICU registrar after hours. Additionally, the ICU registrars commented on an increase to their workload in having to review unstable patients after hours. These results suggest that the ward nurses required additional support and guidance in caring for the unstable patient in the ward which may improve patient outcomes. Further research investigating the less-favourable responses of the ward medical staff and ICU medical staff is warranted.
    Nursing in Critical Care 04/2006; 11(3):118 - 127. · 0.95 Impact Factor
  • Anna Green, Liz Edmonds
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    ABSTRACT: The acute care system in our public hospitals has seen an increase in acuity for multiday patients with associated pressure on access to the intensive care unit (ICU) beds for both elective and emergency patients. When an ICU bed has not been available at this hospital, it has resulted in elective surgery being cancelled and/or emergency patients requiring an ICU admission being transferred to other hospitals. Apart from the problems either of these situations can cause to patients and their families, both government and hospital managements expect that access to an ICU (or other) bed will be available for patients in our community who require this level of care. To maximise access to our ICU beds it was necessary to ensure that length of stay (LOS) in ICU was kept to the minimum required for each individual patient and that re-admission rates to ICU for preventable complications were reduced. This paper relates our experience of developing and introducing an advanced practice nursing position (the ICU Liaison Nurse) in 1998, to oversee the transition of patients discharged from ICU to the general wards. Between 1997 and 2002 with the development of the ICU Liaison Nurse (ICU LN) post, medical readmissions to ICU were reduced from 2.3 to 0.5%. It is now 5 years since the position was introduced and the role has evolved over this time so that today the ICU LN not only bridges the gap between ICU and ward-based care, but when necessary can be involved in the care of patients on the ward whose condition has deteriorated to the point where transfer into ICU may be necessary.
    Intensive and Critical Care Nursing 07/2004; 20(3):133-43.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study is to explore nursing and medical staff's perceptions of a clinical marker referral tool implemented to assist in the early identification of unstable patients in the general surgical and medical ward environment. A descriptive, exploratory survey design was undertaken 6 months after the implementation of a clinical marker referral tool. The target population for the survey was all ward nursing, junior medical staff and intensive care unit (ICU) registrars in a metropolitan tertiary referral hospital in Australia. The survey consisted of open-ended and closed-ended questions, as well as statements asking participants to explore their perceptions, attitudes and perceived understanding of the clinical marker referral tool. The surveys were sent to all targeted staff in a personally addressed envelope via the internal mail system. Overall, nursing and medical staff (n = 178) responses were positive to the clinical marker project/tool, offering clear guidelines for staff to respond to the patient's clinical condition and contact the medical staff and the ICU liaison team as appropriate. Furthermore, comments were made in relation to the ICU liaison team acting as a 'support' and 'prompt back-up' for nursing staff when needed. However, ward medical staff had reservations with the clinical markers chosen and with ward nurses being able to contact the ICU registrar after hours. Additionally, the ICU registrars commented on an increase to their workload in having to review unstable patients after hours. These results suggest that the ward nurses required additional support and guidance in caring for the unstable patient in the ward which may improve patient outcomes. Further research investigating the less-favourable responses of the ward medical staff and ICU medical staff is warranted.
    Nursing in Critical Care 11(3):118-27. · 0.95 Impact Factor