Janice L Y Mong

The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong

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Publications (2)8.57 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To explore the genetic effect of the GH receptor (GHR) on obesity and related metabolic parameters in Hong Kong Chinese adolescents. Obesity is a growing global epidemic. Increasing evidence suggests that the GH-IGF-I axis plays an important role in regulating adiposity and insulin sensitivity. We examined the associations of genetic variants of GHR with serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels as well as obesity-related metabolic traits in Hong Kong Chinese adolescents. Nine hundred and eighty-one randomly selected Hong Kong Chinese adolescents from 14 schools. We genotyped 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) at GHR and measured serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels as well as obesity-related metabolic traits including fasting plasma glucose, insulin and lipid levels. There were significant associations between rs4410646 and the body composition (P = 0.0044) and blood pressure factor scores (P = 0.00017). Carriers of the CC genotype had lower body mass index, percentage body fat, waist and hip circumferences than AC and AA genotype carriers (P = 0.00030-0.0094). There was also association between rs7703713 and the IGF-I activity factor score (P = 0.0033). The GA and AA carriers of rs7703713 had higher serum IGF-I, higher serum IGFBP-3 and higher IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio (P = 0.00069-0.025). Haplotype analysis did not increase the significance of associations. Our results support the role of GHR gene polymorphisms in modulating adiposity and IGF-I activity in adolescents. Examination of interactions of these SNPs with lifestyle, environmental and perinatal factors may provide further insights into their long-term effects on obesity and metabolic risks.
    Clinical Endocrinology 09/2010; 73(3):313-22. · 3.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Childhood obesity is a growing global epidemic. Recent studies indicate that obesity and related metabolic traits are highly heritable. Increasing evidence suggests that growth hormone (GH) and the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis have important functions in regulating adiposity and insulin sensitivity. Five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP3) were genotyped to find their associations with IGF-1 activity level and common clinical metabolic traits. We examined the associations of five SNPs at IGFBP3 with serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels, as well as with obesity-related metabolic traits in 981 Hong Kong Chinese adolescents. Factor analysis was used to reduce the intercorrelated variables to five factor scores indicating body composition, blood pressure, IGF-I activity, triglyceride (TG)+high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and total cholesterol (TC)+low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) factor scores. There was a strong association between the -202A/C polymorphism (rs2854744) and IGF-I activity (P=1.2 x 10(-6)) and TC+LDL-C factor scores (P=0.0085), corrected for age and sex. The C allele was associated with decreased IGFBP-3 levels (P=1.21 x 10(-13)), increased IGF-I/IGFBP-3 molar ratio (P=5.22 x 10(-6)) and decreased LDL-C (P=0.020). There was also a significant association between a G/A polymorphism at the 3' flanking sequence (rs13223993) of the IGFBP3 gene and the TG+HDL-C factor score (P=0.0013). The minor A allele carriers of rs13223993 had a lower HDL-C (P=0.0067) level and a tendency toward a high TG level. Haplotype analysis did not increase the significance of associations between single SNPs and phenotypes. Our results support the function of IGFBP3 gene polymorphisms in modulating IGF-I activity and lipid levels in adolescents. Given the prognostic significance of IGF-I, IGFBPs and lipids on risk of diabetes, obesity and cancer, long-term studies are required to clarify the clinical meaning of these findings.
    International journal of obesity (2005) 09/2009; 33(12):1446-53. · 5.22 Impact Factor