S J McPherson

Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (15)32.28 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Ascending aorta pseudoaneurysm (AAPA) is an uncommon complication following replacement of the ascending aorta with a prosthetic graft, carry a high risk of rupture, and warrant urgent intervention. The open surgical procedure "gold standard" of care is not always favorable, as the reoperations are technically more difficult or patient's general condition doesn't allow proceeding. Case discussed is an 80-year-old male patient who presented with worsening cough and hemoptysis. He underwent ascending aorta replacement 10 years ago. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a contrast-filled mediastinal mass communicating with the ascending aorta and extended into the right lung. Due to the patient's advanced age, friability and clinical condition, combined with the position of the AAPA behind the sternum, surgery was deemed to be high risk. However, favorable anatomical conditions provided a safe landing zone for an endovascular stent. The patient underwent closed procedure. Postprocedure CT showed complete obliteration of the AAPA.
    Vascular and Endovascular Surgery 12/2013; · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Supra-aortic vessel injuries are uncommon but can be life-threatening and surgically challenging. Trauma to these vessels may be blunt or penetrating, including iatrogenic trauma following the insertion of central venous lines, which may be preventable. Recent advances in technology have resulted in endovascular therapy becoming a common first-line treatment, and interventional radiologists now play a major role in the management of these vascular injuries. We review the literature on the endovascular management of these types of injuries and describe a spectrum of case-based extra-cranial supra-aortic vascular injuries managed at our institution and the range of imaging appearances, including active contrast extravasation, traumatic vessel occlusion, true aneurysms, pseudoaneurysms, and arteriovenous fistulae.
    CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology 02/2013; · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology 01/2012; 35(3):472-82. · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Isolated popliteal venous entrapment is unusual and often caused by variation or aberrant origins of the gastrocnemius muscle, thickened perivenous fascia or an abnormal vascular bundle. We report a unique case of a fit and well 35-year-old man with popliteal venous entrapment after presenting to the vascular unit with symptomatic varicose veins. The cause of the entrapment was found to be an aberrant medial sural artery on operative exploration. The artery was ligated, releasing the entrapped vein. The patient made an uneventful recovery with resolution of symptoms of venous insufficiency without evidence of muscle ischaemia.
    Phlebology 07/2011; 27(2):93-5. · 2.07 Impact Factor
  • Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 07/2011; 22(7):1057-8. · 1.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Foam sclerotherapy is a recognised safe treatment modality for low flow vascular malformations. Complications are uncommon. We report the complication of vasospasm in a nineteen year old female with a low flow (venous) malformation of her thenar eminence, leading to dusky discolouration with pain, coolness, numbness and reduced power following foam injection. Treatment with intravenous vasodilators enabled full clinical recovery, preventing irreversible complications.
    European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery 03/2011; 21(2). · 2.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The optimal treatment for type II endoleaks remains unclear. The present report describes a case of ischemic skin ulceration after glue embolization of a type II endoleak with challenging access in a multiply comorbid 82-year-old woman with an expanding aneurysm sac 3 years after endovascular aneurysm repair. Embolization was performed from a proximal position with an n-butyl cyanoacrylate/Ethiodol mixture to allow flow into the endoleak because direct sac puncture was hazardous. One week after intervention, an eschar, which progressed to superficial necrosis as a result of partial nontarget delivery of sclerosant, developed over the left iliac crest. The eschar was self-limiting, with complete resolution by 6 months.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 02/2011; 22(2):163-7. · 1.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this pictorial essay is to illustrate the radiologic patterns, sites of bleeding, and vascular interventional techniques used in the management of postpancreatectomy hemorrhage. CONCLUSION: Hemorrhagic complications occur in fewer than 10% of patients after Whipple pancreatoduodenectomy but account for as many as 38% of deaths. Bleeding typically occurs from the stump of the gastroduodenal artery, but other sites of bleeding are increasingly recognized.
    American Journal of Roentgenology 01/2011; 196(1):192-7. · 2.90 Impact Factor
  • C J Hammond, S J McPherson, J V Patel, M J Gough
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    ABSTRACT: Modern conventional ultrasound is sensitive to slow flow, but may misclassify some tight stenoses as occlusion. Symptomatic patients with tight proximal internal carotid artery stenoses may benefit from carotid endarterectomy but those with occlusion or long-segment disease do not. A prospective study of the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CE-US), 2D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (2D-TOF MRA) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) against a reference standard of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients with apparent carotid occlusion on conventional ultrasound. Thirty-one patients with apparent carotid occlusion on conventional ultrasound and with recent ispilateral hemispheric transient ischaemeic attacks (TIAs) were studied. The primary endpoint was confirmation of occlusion with a secondary endpoint of identification of a surgically correctible lesion. The sensitivity and specificity of CE-US, 2D-TOF MRA and CE-MRA for patency were 1 & 1, 0.33 & 1 and 0.6 & 1 respectively and for the detection of a surgically correctible lesion were 1 & 0.96, 0.67 & 1 and 1 and 0.96 respectively. CE-US was difficult to interpret, precluding confident diagnosis in 5 cases. 2D-TOF MRA had poor sensitivity for patency and cannot be recommended as a second-line investigation to assess vessels apparently occluded on conventional ultrasound. Confident diagnosis on CE-US and CE-MRA accurately identified occlusion. If occlusion is confirmed by either of these modalities, no further imaging is required. The relative advantages of CE-US or CE-MRA in this situation are uncertain.
    European journal of vascular and endovascular surgery: the official journal of the European Society for Vascular Surgery 04/2008; 35(4):405-12. · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Amplatzer Vascular Plug (AVP) is a self-expanding nitinol wire mesh vascular embolization device derived from the Amplatz septal occluder. We assessed the results of vascular embolization obtained using the AVP. A retrospective review was carried out of 23 consecutive cases of vascular embolization using the AVP in a variety of different clinical settings. The AVP was chosen to have a diameter approximately 30-50% greater than the target vessel. The device was delivered via an appropriately sized guide catheter and was released when satisfactorily positioned. Additional embolic agents were used in some cases. All target vessels were successfully occluded with no device malpositioning or malfunction. In 14 (61%) patients the AVP was the sole embolic material. In the remaining patients additional agents were used, particularly in preoperative embolization of highly vascular renal tumors. The AVP does not cause instantaneous thrombosis and in high-flow situations thrombosis typically takes up to 15 min. The AVP is a safe, effective embolization device that provides a useful adjunct to the therapeutic armamentarium. It is particularly suited to the treatment of short high-flow vessels where coil migration and catheter dislodgment might occur. In the majority of cases no additional embolic agents are necessary but it may take up to 15 min for complete thrombosis to occur.
    CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology 01/2008; 30(4):650-4. · 2.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A prospective follow-up study of patients with arterial restenosis undergoing cryoplasty. Between May 2004 and June 2005, 10 patients with restenosis following ilio-femoral endovascular treatment underwent twelve cryoplasty procedures. All patients had had at least one previous episode of stenosis treated by conventional endovascular methods and had suffered further restenosis. The indications for treatment were grafts at risk (n=5) and symptomatic in-stent restenosis (n=5). Two patients underwent re-cryoplasty. Cryoplasty was performed in accordance with manufacturer's instructions using 6-8mm balloons. All patients had Doppler ultrasound evaluation at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. All procedures had angiographically successful immediate outcome with <30% residual stenosis. Non flow limiting dissection was evident in two cases. In six procedures (50%), restenosis was evident within 6 months post-procedure, whilst in the other six, there was progressive restenosis appearing between 6-12 months. Five cryoplasty procedures have needed endovascular re-intervention due to symptomatic high-grade restenosis and a sixth is awaiting surgery. Cryoplasty is of no value in patients with restenosis in the iliofemoral segment with half the procedures failing within six months and all of them within the first year. Evidence to support the use of cryoplasty in the peripheral arterial restenotic lesions is lacking.
    European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery 02/2007; 33(1):40-3. · 2.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To describe a 10-year experience of endovascular and percutaneous treatment of aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis, and to analyze this experience and propose a classification based on computed tomography (CT) and angiographic findings that has therapeutic implications. This may reduce the rate of recurrent bleeding after surgery or endovascular treatment. Twenty-three patients with aneurysms or pseudoaneurysms associated with acute pancreatitis were treated by endovascular or percutaneous methods. All underwent CT and angiography. The early development of a simple classification based on the CT and angiographic findings was used to guide treatment decisions. In accordance with this classification, 19 patients were treated by primary coil embolization and four were treated by primary percutaneous thrombin injection. Among the 19 patients treated by primary coil embolization, there were two early recurrences of the pseudoaneurysm. All four patients treated by percutaneous thrombin injection exhibited late recurrences and were successfully treated by percutaneous thrombin injections. Twenty-one patients (91.3%) were alive at 6 months. Endovascular and percutaneous treatment of aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis is safe and effective and is associated with good outcomes, but careful follow-up is necessary. The decision of which treatment option is most appropriate can be made in accordance with a classification based on CT and angiographic appearance.
    Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology 09/2006; 17(8):1279-85. · 2.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the application of the liquid embolic agent ethylene-vinyl alcohol (Onyx; MicroTherapeutics, Irvine, CA, USA) in the management of visceral artery aneurysms. The technique and indications for using Onyx are discussed with emphasis on the management of wide-necked aneurysms and maintenance of patency of the parent vessel. None of the cases was considered suitable for stent-grafting or embolization with conventional agents. Two aneurysms of the renal artery bifurcation and one aneurysm of the inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery were treated. Following treatment there was complete exclusion of all aneurysms. There was no evidence of end-organ infarction. Follow-up with intervals up to 6 months has shown sustained aneurysm exclusion. Onyx is known to be effective in the management of intracranial aneurysms. Our experience demonstrates the efficacy and applicability of the use of Onyx in the treatment of complex visceral artery aneurysms.
    CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology 01/2006; 29(6):1125-8. · 2.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an established alternate angiographic contrast agent, which can be delivered by pump or hand injection. We describe a simple, safe and inexpensive hand injection system that delivers a known volume of CO2 at atmospheric pressure and prevents contamination with room air.
    Clinical Radiology 02/2005; 60(1):123-5. · 1.66 Impact Factor
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    P Cronin, S J McPherson, J F Meaney, A Mavor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the placement of a covered stent within the internal iliac vein (IIV) to occlude a symptomatic iatrogenic internal iliac arteriovenous fistula following an abdominal aortic graft. Angiography revealed a direct communication between an internal iliac graft to artery anastomosis and the right IIV with rapid shunting into the inferior vena cava and a small associated pseudoaneurysm. Femoral, brachial or axillary arterial access was precluded. The fistula was successfully occluded by a stent-graft placed in the IIV. Arteriovenous fistula can be treated in a number of ways including covered stent placement on the arterial side. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time placement in a vein has been described. Where access is difficult or the procedure carries a high risk of complication, a venous covered stent may offer an alternative.
    CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology 01/2002; 25(4):323-5. · 2.14 Impact Factor