Chun-Ying Huang

National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan, Taiwan

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Publications (34)2.11 Total impact

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    Chun-Ying Huang, Kuan-Ta Chen, Chin-Laung Lei
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    ABSTRACT: With the emergence of active worms, the targets of attacks have been moved from well-known Internet servers to generic Internet hosts, and since the rate at which patches can be applied is always much slower than the spread of a worm, an Internet worm can usually attack or infect millions of hosts in a short time. It is difficult to eliminate Internet attacks globally; thus, protecting client networks from being attacked or infected is a relatively critical issue. In this paper, we propose a method that protects client networks from being attacked by people who try to scan, attack, or infect hosts in local networks via unpatched vulnerabilities. Based on the symmetry of network traffic in both temporal and spatial domains, a bitmap filter is installed at the entry point of a client network to filter out possible attack traffic. Our evaluation shows that with a small amount of memory (less than 1 megabyte), more than 95% of attack traffic can be filtered out in a small- or medium-scale client network
    Dependable Systems and Networks, 2006. DSN 2006. International Conference on; 02/2006
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    ABSTRACT: Virtual router redundancy protocol (VRRP) is designed to eliminate the single point of failure in the static default routing environment in LAN. The original VRRP protocol does not support load balancing for both incoming and outgoing traffic. This paper describes EVRRP, i.e. enhanced VRRP. EVRRP supports an efficient multiple-node cluster and symmetric load balancing among routers. Each router periodically exchanges information to determine the status of the master and backups. The master router distributes and redirects the traffic to one of the backup routers by ICMP redirect message. Backup routers accept the traffic from the master and one of the backup routers takes over the master traffic using a gratuitous ARP message when the master fails. The improved election protocol speeds up the original VRRP election protocol and shortens the failover time by adding a new state in the previous VRRP state diagram and a new protocol type. An extensive evaluation of the EVRRP protocol is described in the paper.
    Dependable Computing, 2005. Proceedings. 11th Pacific Rim International Symposium on; 01/2006
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    ABSTRACT: The success of Skype has inspired a generation of peer-to-peer-based solutions for satisfactory real-time multimedia services over the Internet. However, fundamental questions, such as whether VoIP services like Skype are good enough in terms of user satisfaction,have not been formally addressed. One of the major challenges lies in the lack of an easily accessible and objective index to quantify the degree of user satisfaction.In this work, we propose a model, geared to Skype, but generalizable to other VoIP services, to quantify VoIP user satisfaction based on a rigorous analysis of the call duration from actual Skype traces. The User Satisfaction Index (USI) derived from the model is unique in that 1) it is composed by objective source-and network-level metrics, such as the bit rate, bit rate jitter, and round-trip time, 2) unlike speech quality measures based on voice signals, such as the PESQ model standardized by ITU-T, the metrics are easily accessible and computable for real-time adaptation, and 3) the model development only requires network measurements, i.e., no user surveys or voice signals are necessary. Our model is validated by an independent set of metrics that quantifies the degree of user interaction from the actual traces.
    Proceedings of the ACM SIGCOMM 2006 Conference on Applications, Technologies, Architectures, and Protocols for Computer Communications, Pisa, Italy, September 11-15, 2006; 01/2006
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    ABSTRACT: Online gaming is one of the most profitable busi- nesses on the Internet. Among various threats to continuous player subscriptions, network lags are particularly notorious. It is widely known that frequent and long lags frustrate game players, but whether the players actually take action and leave a game is unclear. Motivated to answer this question, we apply survival analysis to a 1,356-million-packet trace from a sizeable MMORPG, called ShenZhou Online. We find that both network delay and network loss significantly affect a player's willingness to continue a game. For ShenZhou Online, the degrees of player "intolerance" of minimum RTT, RTT jitter, client loss rate, and server loss rate are in the proportion of 1:2:11:6. This indicates that 1) while many network games provide "ping time," i.e., the RTT, to players to facilitate server selection, it would be more useful to provide information about delay jitters; and 2) players are much less tolerant of network loss than delay. This is due to the game designer's decision to transfer data in TCP, where packet loss not only results in additional packet delays due to in-order delivery and retransmission, but also a lower sending rate. FPS (First-Person Shooting) games, RTS (Real Time Strategy) games, sports games, and car racing games (2, 3, 11, 13, 16- 18) (cf. Section II-A). MMORPGs are different in that there are no explicit victories or defeats, scores, or rankings, and the playing time is a more appropriate indicator of the player's gaming experience. Therefore, in this attempt to understand MMORPG players' QoS-sensitivity, we ask the question: "Once a player is in a game, how does network QoS affect his decision to continue or leave the game?" This work is, as far as we know, the first quantitative analysis on the relationship between network QoS and online game playing times. In this paper, we analyze the lifetimes of game sessions derived from ShenZhou Online (20), a commercial MMORPG. Using a survival analysis approach, we investigate the relation- ship between network QoS and session times. Although, logi- cally, the relation of cause and effect cannot be clarified from a cross-sectional study, we assume the correlation between game session times and network QoS implies that premature departures are caused by unfavorable network experience. The major findings are as follows. First, we show that both network delay and network loss significantly affect players' willingness to continue a game or leave it, whereas earlier studies indicate that players have remarkable tolerance of unfavorable network conditions (3, 11, 18). Second, while many network games provide "ping time," i.e. the round trip time (RTT), to players to facilitate server selection, we show that the delay jitters are more important than absolute delays in terms of playing time. Therefore, in addition to the "ping time," its variations should also be considered in the server selection process. Third, quantitatively, the degrees of player "intolerance" to minimum RTT, RTT jitter, client loss rate, and server loss rate are in the proportion of 1:2:11:6. To be specific, a player's decision to leave a game due to unfavorable network conditions is based on the following levels of intolerance: client packet loss (55%), server packet loss (30%), RTT fluctuations (10%), and minimum RTT (5%). While most QoS- sensitivity studies focus on the impact of delay, we argue that delay jitters and the packet loss (error) rate are more important, since, from our modeling, absolute delay times only contribute 1/20 of the influence on average to the QoS- intolerance of MMORPG players. Furthermore, we believe
    INFOCOM 2006. 25th IEEE International Conference on Computer Communications, Joint Conference of the IEEE Computer and Communications Societies, 23-29 April 2006, Barcelona, Catalunya, Spain; 01/2006
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    ABSTRACT: As quality of service gains more and more attention, bandwidth controllers gradually become one of the most impor-tant network systems used in modern Internet environment. The demand for high-performance in-line bandwidth controllers is driven by the growing bandwidth available in the last mile WAN links as well as the sophisticated packet processing functions that become essential in current computer networks. In this paper, we propose an adaptive clustering scheme to scale the throughput of in-line devices and implement the bandwidth control functions over a cluster of in-line devices. The proposed scheme aggregates the processing power of multiple in-line devices in the cluster by making incoming traffic self-dispatched in a transparent fashion, and incorporates a flow migration mechanism that keeps the load of each device balanced. The resulted cluster is also able to toler-ate device failures and hence is run-time reconfigurable. Based on the proposed scheme, we successfully design a distributed policy adjustment algorithm, the proportional bandwidth alloca-tion algorithm, and implement a clustered bandwidth controller over embedded Linux. The results of performance evaluation suggest that the proposed traffic redistribution mechanism and distributed policy adjustment algorithm can be used together to realize high-performance and reconfigurable bandwidth control-lers.
    Systems and Networks Communication, International Conference on. 01/2006;
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    ABSTRACT: A fundamental design question to ask in the development of a network game is—Which transport protocol should be used—TCP, UDP, or some other protocols? Seeking an ob- jective answer to the choice of communication protocol for MMORPGs, we assess whether TCP, a popular choice, is suitable for MMORPGs based on empirical evidence. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first evaluation of transport protocol performance using real-life game traces. We analyze a 1, 356-million-packet trace from ShenZhou Online, a TCP-based, commercial, mid-sized MMORPG. Our analysis indicates that TCP is unwieldy and inappropri- ate for MMORPGs. This is due to four distinctive charac- teristics of MMORPG traffic: 1) tiny packets, 2) low packet rate, 3) application-limited traffic generation, and 4) bi- directional traffic. We show that because TCP was origi- nally designed for unidirectional and network-limited bulk data transfers, it cannot adapt well to MMORPG traffic. In particular, the window-based congestion control and the fast retransmit algorithm for loss recovery are ineffective. Fur- thermore, TCP is overkill, as not every game packet needs to be transmitted in a reliably and orderly manner. We also show that the degraded network performance did impact users' willingness to continue a game. Finally, we discuss guidelines in designing transport protocols for online games.
    Proceedings of the International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology, ACE 2006, Hollywood, California, USA, June 14-16, 2006; 01/2006
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    ABSTRACT: We present two threshold ring signature schemes with different properties. One focuses on the confessibility (or signer verifiability) and the denouncibility properties. The other focuses on the threshold-confessibility. Our schemes are built on generic ring signature schemes and can be easily adapted to most existing ring signature schemes. Based on the former works, we also construct a realization of our schemes as an example. We prove that our schemes are secure in the random oracle model.
    Proceedings of the International Conference on Systems and Networks Communications (ICSNC 2006), October 29 - November 3, 2006, Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia; 01/2006
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    ABSTRACT: We propose a general desgn for secure collaboraton systems, whchs underpnned wth an access control polcy model, an admnstratve scheme, and an en forcement scheme, based on the Typed Usage Control (TUCON) model. TUCONs a generalzed form of the usage control model (UCON) proposed recently. By utlzng mutable object attrbutes, UCON can reflect the dynamc nature of ad-hoc collaboratons such as temporal and/or spatal usages. In TUCON, every object has an object type as a persstent attrbute, whch works as a name space thatndcates an organzaton to whch the object belongs. Wth object types, TUCON polces can dstnctly controlntra-organzaton and �nter-organzatonnformaton flows. Ths approach acheves the autonomy of collaboratve teams as well as the mutual confdentalty of collaboratng organzatons. ABSTRACT A secure multicast framework should only allow authorized members of a group to decrypt received messages; usually one "group key" is shared by all approved members. How- ever, this raises the problem of "one affects all," whereby the actions of one member affect the whole group. Many researchers solve the problem by dividing a group into sev- eral subgroups, but most existing solutions require a cen- tralized trusted controller to coordinate cryptographic keys for subgroups. We believe this is a constraint on network scalability. In this paper, we propose a novel framework to solve key management problems in multicast networks. Our contribution is three-fold: 1) We exploit the ElGamal cryptosystem and propose the idea of key composition; 2) A distributed key assignment protocol is proposed to eliminate the need for a centralized trust controller in a secure multi- cast network that leverages proxy cryptography; and 3) We adopt a hybrid encryption technique that makes our frame- work more efficient and practical. Comparison with similar frameworks shows the proposed scheme is efficient in both time and space complexity. In addition, costs of most pro- tocol operations are bounded by constants regardless of a group's size and the degree of transit nodes.
    Proceedings of the 2006 ACM Symposium on Information, Computer and Communications Security, ASIACCS 2006, Taipei, Taiwan, March 21-24, 2006; 01/2006
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    ABSTRACT: The growth of the bandwidth available in WAN links stimulates novel usage of traditional network systems. By extending the boundary of cluster file systems to the customers' premise, it is now possible to provide home users efficient, dependable, and responsive network storage. In this paper, we identify the primary issue of network latency when implementing cluster file systems across the last miles, and propose a solution by replacing the round-based data transmission protocol of Coda file system with a rate-based one. The performance evaluation of the prototype system shows significant improvements of both throughput and response time for file-transfer operations, especially under high network latency. The result is a latency-resistant cluster file system.
    TENCON 2005 2005 IEEE Region 10; 12/2005
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we propose a novel framework for secure multicast on overlay networks. Our contributions are three-fold: 1) a technique key composition is proposed to cope with the secure multicast problems, 2) the proposed framework is totally distributed, i.e., no centralized control is required for subgroup configurations, and 3) a comparison of similar frameworks is provided, in which we show the proposed framework is more efficient in that its time and space complexity are bounded by constants, regardless of the number of coexisting groups, the group size, and the degree of transit nodes
    Local Computer Networks, 2005. 30th Anniversary. The IEEE Conference on; 12/2005
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    ABSTRACT: TCP employs a self-clocking scheme that times the sending of packets. In that, the data packets are sent in a burst when the returning acknowledgement packets are received. This self-clocking scheme (also known as ack-clocking) is deemed a key factor to the the burstiness of TCP traffic and the source of various performance problems-high packet loss, long delay, and high delay jitter. Previous work has suggested contradictively the effectiveness of TCP pacing as a remedy to alleviate the traffic burstiness. In this paper, we analyze systematically, and in more robust experiments the impact of network variabilities on the behavior of TCP clocking schemes. We find that 1) aggregated pacing traffic could be burstier than aggregated ack-clocking traffic. Physical explanation and experimental simulations are provided to support this argument. 2) The round-trip time heterogeneity and flow multiplexing significantly influence the behaviors of both ack-clocking and pacing schemes. Evaluating the performance of clocking schemes without considering these effects is prone to inconsistent results. 3) Pacing outperforms ack-clocking in more realistic settings from the traffic burstiness point of view.
    INFOCOM 2005. 24th Annual Joint Conference of the IEEE Computer and Communications Societies. Proceedings IEEE; 04/2005
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    ABSTRACT: CPE-based IPsec VPNs have been widely used to provide secure private communication across the Internet. As the bandwidth of WAN links keeps growing, the bottleneck in a typical deployment of CPE-based IPsec VPNs has moved from the last-mile connections to the customer-edge security gateways. In this paper, we propose a clustering scheme to scale the throughput as required by CPE-based IPsec VPNs. The proposed scheme groups multiple security gateways into a cluster using a transparent self-dispatching technique and allows as many gateways to be added as necessary until the resulting throughput is again limited by the bandwidth of the last-mile connections. It also includes a flow-migration mechanism to keep the load of the gateways balanced. The results of the performance evaluation confirm that the clustering technique and the traffic-redistribution mechanism together create a transparent, adaptive, and highly scalable solution for building high-performance IPsec VPNs.
    High Performance Computing - HiPC 2005, 12th International Conference, Goa, India, December 18-21, 2005, Proceedings; 01/2005
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    Yun-Peng Chiu, Chin-Laung Lei, Chun-Ying Huang
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    ABSTRACT: In a secure multicast communication environment, only valid members belong to the multicast group could decrypt the data. In many previous researches, there is one “group key” shared by all group members. However, this incurs the so-called “1 affects n problem,” that is, an action of one member affects the whole group. We believe this is the source of scalability problems. Moreover, from the administrative perspective, it is desired to confine the impacts of changing membership events in a local area. In this paper, we propose a new secure multicast architecture without using a group key. We exploit a cryptographic primitive “proxy encryption.” It allows routers to convert a ciphertext encrypted under a key to a ciphertext encrypted under another key, without revealing the secret key and the plaintext. By giving proper keys to intermediate routers, routers could provide separation between subgroups. Therefore the goals of scalability and containment are achieved.
    Information and Communications Security, 7th International Conference, ICICS 2005, Beijing, China, December 10-13, 2005, Proceedings; 01/2005
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    ABSTRACT: Online gaming is one of the most profitable businesses over the Internet. Among all genres of the online games, the popularity of the MMORPG (Massive Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games) is especially prominent in Asia. Opting for a better understanding of the game traffic and the economic well being of the Internet, we analyze a 1,356-million-packet trace from a sizeable MMORPG, ShenZhou Online. This work is, as far as we know, the first formal analysis on the MMORPG server traces.We find that the MMORPG and FPS (First-Person Shooting) games are similar in that they both generate small packets and require low bandwidths. In particular, the bandwidth requirement of MMORPG is even lower due to the less real-time game play. More distinctive are the strong periodicity, temporal locality, and irregularity observed in the MMORPG traffic. The periodicity is due to a common practice in game implementation, where the game state updates are accumulated within a fixed time window before transmission. The temporal locality in the game traffic is largely due to the game nature where one action leads to another. The irregularity, particular unique in MMORPG traffic, is due to the diversity of game design where the user behavior can be drastically different depending on the quest at hand.
    Network and Operating System Support for Digital Audio and Video, 15th International Workshop, NOSSDAV 2005, Stevenson, Washington, USA, June 13-14, 2005, Proceedings; 01/2005