H.-U. Schmidt

Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Arching, Bavaria, Germany

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Publications (7)11.45 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies reported a significant reduction in bacterial load in chronic wounds in patients with cold argon plasma. This open retrospective study evaluated effects on wound healing in vivo using the MicroPlaSter alpha device, with wound healing a secondary endpoint. Chronic wounds of various etiologies in 70 patients (Group A) were treated with plasma for 3–7 min. Wound dimensions before and after treatment were compared for plasma-treated and control wounds. Subgroup analyses were performed for all chronic venous ulcers (n=27, Group B) and 5 min plasma treatment of chronic venous ulcers (n=18, Group C). Patient acted as own control. In Group A plasma-treated wounds showed a greater reduction in width and length than control wounds. Reduction rates were non-significant. In Group B a significantly greater reduction in width was measured in plasma-treated ulcers compared to controls, but not in ulcer length. Group C showed again a significant reduction in width with plasma treatment but not in ulcer length. This study suggests that wound healing may be accelerated, particularly for chronic venous ulcers.
    12/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.cpme.2013.06.001
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    ABSTRACT: Two cold atmospheric plasma devices were used (either in an indirect or a direct way) for the treatment of physiologically contaminated forearms in 12 healthy volunteers. After 30 s of plasma treatment, the log reduction of the bacterial load in the plasma treated area was evaluated. It was found that both the indirect and direct plasma application resulted in a highly significant reduction of the bacterial load in the target area. Given the same plasma treatment time, the direct application showed higher mean log reduction in comparison to the indirect one and proved to be significantly more effective.
    12/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.cpme.2013.09.001
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Chronic infected wounds are both socioeconomic and medical problem. Combating bacterial resistance is on of the greatest challenges in the 21st century. In previous reports, 2 min and 5 min cold argon plasma treatments led to a significant reduction in bacterial load in chronic wounds of various causes in patients, regardless of the bacterial species. The observed bactericidal effect of plasma therapy relies on the synergy of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, charged particles, electric fields, and UVR. This study evaluates the effect of CAPs on wound healing in vivo. Methods: Hard-to-heal chronic wounds of various types in 70 patients (Group A) were treated with co 554 ld argon atmospheric plasma for 3-7 minutes. The wound size before and after a course of treatment was compared for plasma-treated and control wounds. Subgroup analyses were performed for all chronic venous ulcers (n=29, Group B) and 5 min plasma treatment of chronic venous ulcers (n=18, Group C). Results: Retrospective analysis of Group A revealed a 10.4 % reduction in width of plasma treated wounds compared to 4.2 % in the control (p=0.270). Length reduced by 8.2 % compared to 5.1% respectively (p=0.068). In Group B a significantly greater reduction in width (17.9 %, p=0.03) was measured in plasma-treated ulcers compared to controls (0 %). However changes in length were not significantly different (9.1 % vs. 8.9 %, p=0.46). The Group C sub analysis showed a highly significant reduction in width (14.6 % vs. 0 %, p=0.008) with plasma treatment but not in ulcer length (2.7 % vs. 8.4 %, p=0.352). Conclusions: This study demonstrates for the first time that plasma treatment can actually accelerate wound healing in a range of chronic wounds, but particularly chronic venous ulcers.
    Plasma Science (ICOPS), 2013 Abstracts IEEE International Conference on; 01/2013
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    ABSTRACT: It is well known that the evolution of resistance of microorganisms to a range of different antibiotics presents a major problem in the control of infectious diseases. Accordingly, new bactericidal 'agents' are in great demand. Using a cold atmospheric pressure (CAP) plasma dispenser operated with ambient air, a more than five orders of magnitude inactivation or reduction of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; resistant against a large number of the tested antibiotics) was obtained in less than 10 s. This makes CAP the most promising candidate for combating nosocomial (hospital-induced) infections. To test for the occurrence and development of bacterial resistance against such plasmas, experiments with Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus mundtii) were performed. The aim was to determine quantitative limits for primary (naturally) or secondary (acquired) resistance against the plasma treatment. Our results show that E. coli and E. mundtii possess no primary resistance against the plasma treatment. By generating four generations of bacteria for every strain, where the survivors of the plasma treatment were used for the production of the next generation, a lower limit to secondary resistance was obtained. Our results indicate that CAP technology could contribute to the control of infections in hospitals, in outpatient care and in disaster situations, providing a new, fast and efficient broad-band disinfection technology that is not constrained by bacterial resistance mechanisms.
    New Journal of Physics 07/2012; 14. DOI:10.1088/1367-2630/14/7/073037 · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bacterial colonization of chronic wounds slows healing. Cold atmospheric plasma has been shown in vitro to kill a wide range of pathogenic bacteria. Objectives To examine the safety and efficiency of cold atmospheric argon plasma to decrease bacterial load as a new medical treatment for chronic wounds. Thirty-eight chronic infected wounds in 36 patients were treated in a prospective randomized controlled phase II study with 5 min daily cold atmospheric argon plasma in addition to standard wound care. The patient acted as his or her own control. Bacterial species were detected by standard bacterial swabs and semiquantitative changes by nitrocellulose filters. Plasma setting and safety had been determined in a preceding phase I study. Analysis of 291 treatments in 38 wounds found a highly significant (34%, P < 10(-6)) reduction of bacterial load in treated wounds, regardless of the type of bacteria. No side-effects occurred and the treatment was well tolerated. Cold atmospheric argon plasma treatment is potentially a safe and painless new technique to decrease bacterial load of chronic wounds and promote healing.
    British Journal of Dermatology 03/2010; 163(1):78-82. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2133.2010.09744.x · 4.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A new, very efficient, large area scalable and robust electrode design for plasma production in air at atmosphere pressures has been developed and tested. This has made the development of a ‘plasma dispenser’ for hospital disinfection possible, which has certain advantages over current fluid disinfection systems. The properties of this device are presented, in particular the bactericidal and fungicidal efficiency, and the advantages are described. Such plasma dispensers could play an important role in the future fight against the alarming and growing threat posed by nosocomial (=hospital and community associated) bacterial infections.
    New Journal of Physics 11/2009; DOI:10.1088/1367-2630/11/11/115019 · 3.67 Impact Factor