Tannys D R Vause

The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

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Publications (6)2.82 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To improve awareness of the natural age-related decline in female and male fertility with respect to natural fertility and assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and provide recommendations for their management,and to review investigations in the assessment of ovarian aging. This guideline reviews options for the assessment of ovarian reserve and fertility treatments using ART with women of advanced reproductive age presenting with infertility. The outcomes measured are the predictive value of ovarian reserve testing and pregnancy rates with natural and assisted fertility. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed or Medline, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library in June 2010, using appropriate key words (ovarian aging, ovarian reserve, advanced maternal age, advanced paternal age, ART). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated into the guideline to December 2010. The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Recommendations for practice were ranked according to the method described in that report (Table). Primary and specialist health care providers and women will be better informed about ovarian aging and the age-related decline in natural fertility and about options for assisted reproductive technology.
    International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics 04/2012; 117(1):95-102. · 1.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To review current non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic options for ovulation induction in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This guideline reviews the evidence for the various options for ovulation induction in PCOS. Ovulation, pregnancy and live birth rates, risks, and side effects are the outcomes of interest. Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and of health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The evidence gathered was reviewed and evaluated by the Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. The quality of evidence was quantified using the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Benefits include weight reduction and improvements in ovulation, pregnancy, and live birth rates. Potential harms include medication side effects and multiple pregnancies. These guidelines have been reviewed and approved by the Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Committee of the SOGC.
    International journal of gynaecology and obstetrics: the official organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics 10/2010; 111(1):95-100. · 1.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To review current non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic options for ovulation induction in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This guideline reviews the evidence for the various options for ovulation induction in PCOS. Ovulation, pregnancy and live birth rates, risks, and side effects are the outcomes of interest. Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline using appropriate controlled vocabulary and key words. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and of health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The evidence gathered was reviewed and evaluated by the Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. The quality of evidence was quantified using the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Benefits include weight reduction and improvements in ovulation, pregnancy, and live birth rates. Potential harms include medication side effects and multiple pregnancies. These guidelines have been reviewed and approved by the Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Committee of the SOGC. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Weight loss, exercise, and lifestyle modifications have been proven effective in restoring ovulatory cycles and achieving pregnancy in overweight women with PCOS and should be the first-line option for these women. (II-3A) Morbidly obese women should seek expert advice about pregnancy risk. (III-A) 2. Clomiphene citrate has been proven effective in ovulation induction for women with PCOS and should be considered the first-line therapy. Patients should be informed that there is an increased risk of multiple pregnancy with ovulation induction using clomiphene citrate. (I-A) 3. Metformin combined with clomiphene citrate may increase ovulation rates and pregnancy rates but does not significantly improve the live birth rate over that of clomiphene citrate alone.(I-A) Metformin may be added to clomiphene citrate in women with clomiphene resistance who are older and who have visceral obesity. (I-A) 4. Gonadotropin should be considered second-line therapy for fertility in anovulatory women with PCOS. The treatment requires ultrasound and laboratory monitoring. High costs and the risk of multiple pregnancy and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome are drawbacks of the treatment. (II-2A) 5. Laparoscopic ovarian drilling may be considered in women with clomiphene-resistant PCOS, particularly when there are other indications for laparoscopy. (I-A) Surgical risks need to be considered in these patients. (III-A) 6. In vitro fertilization should be reserved for women with PCOS who fail gonadotropin therapy or who have other indications for IVF treatment. (II-2A).
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 05/2010; 32(5):495-502.
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    ABSTRACT: To review the effect of elective single embryo transfer (eSET) compared with double embryo transfer (DET) following in vitro fertilization (IVF), and to provide guidelines on the use of eSET in order to optimize live birth rates and minimize twin pregnancies. Rates of live birth, clinical pregnancy, and multiple pregnancy following eSET and DET are compared. Live birth, clinical pregnancy, and multiple pregnancy rates, and cost-effectiveness. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed, Medline, and The Cochrane Library in 2009, using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., elective single embryo transfer) and key words (e.g., embryo transfer, in vitro fertilization, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, assisted reproductive technologies, blastocyst, and multiple pregnancy). Results were restricted to English language systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to November 2009. Additional references were identified through searches of bibliographies of identified articles and international medical specialty societies. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. Available evidence was reviewed by the Joint Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologist of Canada-Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society Clinical Practice Guidelines Committee and the Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada, and was qualified using the evaluation of evidence criteria outlined in the report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. This guideline is intended to minimize the occurrence of twin gestations while maintaining acceptable overall live birth rates following IVF-ET. SUMMARY STATEMENTS 1. Indiscriminate application of eSET in populations with less than optimal prognosis for live birth will result in a significant reduction in effectiveness compared with DET. (I) 2. In women aged 38 years and over, eSET may result in a significant reduction in live birth rate compared with DET. (II-2) 3. Selective application of eSET in a small group of good-prognosis patients may be effective in reducing the overall multiple rate of an entire IVF population. (II-3) 4. Given the high costs of treatment, uptake of eSET would be enhanced by public funding of IVF treatment. (II-2) Recommendations 1. Patients should be informed of the reductions in both multiple pregnancy rate and overall live birth rate after a single fresh eSET when compared with DET in good-prognosis patients. (I-A) 2. Because the cumulative live birth rate after fresh eSET followed by transfer of a single frozen-thawed embryo is similar but not equivalent to the rate after fresh DET in good-prognosis patients, the eSET strategy should be used in order to avoid multiple pregnancy. (I-A) 3. Women aged 35 years or less, in their first or second IVF attempt, with at least 2 good quality embryos available for transfer should be considered good-prognosis patients. (I-A) 4. In order to maximize cumulative live birth rates following eSET, effective cryopreservation programs should be in place. (I-A) 5. In order to maintain the reduction in the rate of multiples achieved by fresh eSET, eSET should be performed in subsequent frozen-thawed embryo transfer cycles. (II-2A) 6. Because blastocyst stage embryo transfer generally increases the chance of implantation and live birth compared with cleavage stage embryo transfer, eSET should be performed in good-prognosis patients who have good quality blastocysts available. (I-A) 7. In women aged 36 to 37 years, eSET should be considered in good-prognosis patients with good quality embryos, particularly when blastocysts are available for transfer. (II-2A) 8. In oocyte donor-recipient cycles when the donor has good prognosis and when good quality embryos are available, eSET should be performed. (II-2B) 9. In women with medical or obstetrical contraindications to twin pregnancy, eSET should be performed. (III-B) 10. In order to achieve successful uptake of eSET, it is essential to provide patient and physician education regarding the risks of twin pregnancy and regarding the similar cumulative live birth rate following an eSET strategy and DET. (III-C) 11. When considering both direct health care and societal costs, it should be noted that live birth following eSET is significantly less expensive than DET in good-prognosis patients. (I-A) Therefore, from a cost-effectiveness perspective, eSET is indicated in good-prognosis patients. (III-A).
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 04/2010; 32(4):363-77.
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    ABSTRACT: Pre-conception counselling is important, as most pregnancies are unplanned. There are few published studies examining women's attitudes and knowledge in this area. As part of our ongoing education quality improvement program we evaluated the pre-conception knowledge and attitudes of women at an infertility clinic. Women who presented for initial assessment to a university-affiliated infertility clinic completed a knowledge survey prior to the first physician consultation. Four hundred surveys were appropriately completed for data analysis. Patients were well informed about health optimization, folic acid consumption, infectious disease exposure, medication use, partner abuse, smoking, and recreational drug use. Patients were not well informed about the risks of daily alcohol consumption, advanced maternal age, exercise, cat litter exposure, and consumption of fish and certain other foods. They were uncertain about the importance of rubella immunization and family history. Nulliparous women were less knowledgeable about the significance of rubella immunization, exercise, recreational drug use, cat litter exposure, and fish consumption. Women who were more educated had more knowledge about the effects of the mother's age, exercise, alcohol exposure, and smoking on pregnancy. There are gaps in knowledge, even in the highly motivated population of infertile women who are planning to be pregnant. The results of this survey suggest that women need and want their physicians to educate them about optimal pre-pregnancy lifestyle. We will revise our education programs to account for these gaps. Larger population-based studies are needed to assess knowledge in the general population, so that appropriate health promotion and education programs can be implemented.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 08/2009; 31(8):717-20.

Publication Stats

44 Citations
2.82 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • The Ottawa Hospital
      Ottawa, Ontario, Canada