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Publications (6)8.66 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This study explores how employment is associated with perceived physical and mental health status in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) adjusted for sociodemographic and clinical variables stratified by age. The sample consisted of 184 MS patients divided into a younger (<45 years) and an older (≥45 years) age group. Respondents underwent an interview, a neurological examination on disability [Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS)], and completed the Short Form-36 Health Survey. Of the respondents (mean age 40.5±6.2 years), 43.5% were employed. Significant differences between younger and older patients were found in employment, EDSS, disease duration, and five Short Form-36 Health Survey dimensions. Block-step multiple regression explained 32.4% of the variance in physical health and 14.5% in mental health in the younger group. Being employed was significantly related to good physical health, whereas EDSS diminished the effect of being employed on physical health. The most important variable for mental health was employment status in the younger group. For the older age group, 19.1% of the variance in physical health and 14.0% of the variance in mental health was explained by the studied variables. Male gender and a lower EDSS were significant explanatory variables of better physical health. Male gender significantly explained mental health in the older age group. In conclusion, employment status was an explanatory variable for physical health and mental health in the younger patients. EDSS played a significant role in physical health for all patients. A vocational rehabilitation program could prevent eventual nonemployment and improve health outcomes in older MS people.
    International journal of rehabilitation research. Internationale Zeitschrift fur Rehabilitationsforschung. Revue internationale de recherches de readaptation 12/2011; 35(1):40-7. · 0.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim is to explore the association between self-rated health and employment status in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) when controlling for age, gender, functional disability, disease duration, anxiety and depression. One hundred eighty-four people with MS completed a sociodemographic questionnaire that included questions on employment status, the first item of the Short Form-36 Health Survey and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Functional disability was assessed using the Expanded Disability Status Scale. The probability of good self-rated health in employed persons was investigated using stepwise logistic regression analyses. Patients with MS who reported good self-rated health were 2.46 times more likely to be employed (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08-5.59). Patients without anxiety were 2.64 times more likely to be employed (95%CI: 1.23-5.67). Patients with higher EDSS scores were 0.49 times less likely to be employed (95%CI: 0.33-0.70). Age, gender, disease duration and the presence of depression did not show an increased chance of patient employment. Patients with MS with good self-rated health are more likely to be employed, even after adjusting for age, gender, education, functional disability, disease duration, depression and anxiety. Dependent on the findings of longitudinal studies unravelling the relevant causal pahways, self-rated health might be used as a quick and cheap prognostic marker, which could warn about the possible loss of employment, or changes in functional disability.
    Disability and Rehabilitation 03/2010; 32(21):1742-8. · 1.54 Impact Factor
  • European Psychiatry - EUR PSYCHIAT. 01/2009; 24.
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    ABSTRACT: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease that is difficult to predict and to cope with. Mastery refers to the extent to which patients see themselves as being in control of the forces that affect their lives. It may play an important role in perceived health status and well-being. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether mastery is associated with functional disability and perceived health status in MS patients and how such an association might function. Two hundred and three MS patients completed the Short-Form-36 Health Survey as well as the Pearlin-Schooler Mastery Scale. Functional disability was assessed using the Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses were performed on the data from two MS age groups: <45 and > or =45 years of age. Functional disability was negatively associated with perceived physical health status in both age groups and with perceived mental health status in younger age group. Mastery was positively associated with perceived health status in older age group. The findings confirm that mastery might be helpful for older MS patients. Education strategies for MS patients aimed at personal empowerment for the maintaining of physical and mental well-being may be important.
    European Journal of Neurology 11/2008; 15(11):1237-44. · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The main aim of this study was to investigate whether different levels of perceived social support are associated with different levels of perceived health status in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Two hundred and seven MS patients (38.4+/-10.6 years, 66.2% female) completed the Short-Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36) as the measure for perceived health status, and the perceived social support scale (PSSS) as the measure for social support. Functional disability was assessed using Kurtzke's expanded disability status scale (EDSS). The contribution of EDSS and PSSS for explaining the variance in SF-36 was investigated with multiple linear regression analysis. Demographic variables and EDSS explained 44% of the variance of the physical health summary scale in the SF-36. Demographic variables, EDSS and PSSS from family and friends explained 24% of the variance in mental health summary scale in the SF-36. Results varied according to the multiple linear regression analyses of predictors of variance in the eight dimensions of the SF-36. PSSS from significant others was positively associated with general health dimension of perceived physical health status, while PSSS from family and friends was positively associated with perceived mental health status in MS patients. The results show the importance of supporting social ties and relationships between MS patients and others.
    Patient Education and Counseling 06/2008; 73(1):159-65. · 2.60 Impact Factor
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    Rosenberger J, Gavelova M, Gdovinova Z