Claude Rouch

University of La Réunion, Saint-Denis, RE, Reunion

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Publications (11)33.92 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Recently, an activation of the endocannabinoid system during obesity has been reported. More particularly, it has been demonstrated that hypothalamic levels of both endocannabinoids, 2-arachidonoylglycerol and anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine), are up-regulated in genetically obese rodents. Circulating levels of both endocannabinoids were also shown to be higher in obese compared with lean women. Yet, the direct production of endocannabinoids by human adipocytes has never been demonstrated. Our aim was to evaluate the ability of human adipocytes to produce endocannabinoids. The production of endocannabinoids by human adipocytes was investigated in a model of human white subcutaneous adipocytes in primary culture. The effects of leptin, adiponectin, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma activation on endocannabinoid production by adipocytes were explored. Endocannabinoid levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-mass spectrometry (MS) analysis, leptin and adiponectin secretion measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and PPAR-gamma protein expression examined by Western blotting. We show that 2-arachidonoylglycerol, anandamide, and both anandamide analogs, N-palmitoylethanolamine and N-oleylethanolamine, are produced by human white subcutaneous adipocytes in concentrations ranging from 0.042+/-0.004 to 0.531+/-0.048 pM/mg lipid extract. N-palmitoylethanolamine is the most abundant cannabimimetic compound produced by human adipocytes, and its levels are significantly down-regulated by leptin but not affected by adiponectin and PPAR-gamma agonist ciglitazone. N-palmitoylethanolamine itself does not affect either leptin or adiponectin secretion or PPAR-gamma protein expression in adipocytes. This study has led to the identification of human adipocytes as a new source of endocannabinoids and related compounds. The biological significance of these adipocyte cannabimimetic compounds and their potential implication in obesity should deserve further investigations.
    Obesity 04/2007; 15(4):837-45. · 3.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we have investigated the frequencies of TAP1 and TAP2 alleles in a group of 226 persons, living in La Reunion Island, consisting of 70 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and most of their first degree relatives (i.e., 156 parents and full sibling subjects) and previously HLA DQB1, DQA1, and DRB1 genotyped. The population of this island is constituted by a particular structure of highly crossbreeding people. Interestingly, the new TAP2*0104 allele, previously discovered by our team in Reunion Island, was found to be increased in the IDDM population and the calculated HRR was relatively high (HRR = 3.3). This result seems to be due to a positive linkage disequilibrium between TAP2*0104 allele and the highly diabetogenous DQB1* 0201-DQA1* 0501-DRB1 0301 haplotype (HRR = 9), which suggests that TAP2*0104 cannot be considered as an additional predispositional factor, but more as a genetic susceptibility marker of IDDM. In addition, we show that minor alleles (TAP2D, *0102, *0103, *0104) are associated with a restricted number of HLA DQ-DR haplotypes and each of them exhibits a preferential linkage with one particular haplotype. In contrast with other alleles, and despite a HRR value close to 1, we show that TAP2*0102 allele contributes significantly to a drastic reduction of the diabetogenic effect of DQB1*0201-DQA1*0301.1-DRB*0701 haplotype. Indeed, this haplotype, which is usually preferentially transmitted to affected children, is dominantly transmitted to healthy children when it is associated with TAP2*0102. Therefore, this allele seems to contribute to genetic protection to IDDM.
    Human Immunology 09/2004; 65(8):783-93. · 2.30 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 04/2002; 43(5). · 3.11 Impact Factor
  • Photosynthesis Research 01/1998; · 3.15 Impact Factor
  • Photosynthesis Research 01/1998; · 3.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several methods for protein determination have been described. In almost all cases, a detection reagent is involved (Coomassie Blue reagent, bicinchoninic acid, Folin reagent). Proteins quantification determination by measurements in the U.V. region have been abandonned because of the weak sensitivity of the apparatus (concentrations of the order of 100 μg/ml) and because of the lack of precision at low wavelengths (far U.V.).Owing to the progress in the performance of equipments, (i) we have been able to show that the reliability of current equipments allowed measurements in the more sensitivity range of proteins (190 to 220 nm) and beyond (220 to 1100 nm) and (ii) we have hence calculated the correlation factors between absorbance values and wavelengths for 17 proteins. It was found that 190 nm and 277 nm were the best wavelengths in far U.V. region for the protein quantification (correlation factor respectively of 0.69 and 0.62).The concentrations of 16 proteins were predicted at 190 nm and 277 nm, with lactoglobulin (standard range between 0 and 35 μg/ml, and 0 to 3.5 μg/ml) and trypsinogen (standard range between 0 and 35 μg/ml) respectively as standards. The results were better (especially at 190 nm) than those achieved with the BCA method (indirect quantification of proteins with the Bicinchoninic Acid method), one of the mostly used method at the moment.The main interest of such a quantification method is in its non damaging effects on proteins. Indeed, since HPLC is the mostly used purification methods, tiny quantities of proteins are recovered; it is hence necessary to save them for physico-chemical characterisation (molecular weight, secondary and quaternary structures …) and in case of enzymes, for kinetic studies.
    Spectroscopy Letters 09/1997; 30(6):1067-1088. · 0.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The inhibition of palmito (Acanthophoenix rubra) polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is reported. Recently, two forms of palmito PPO were partially purified by hydrophobic chromatography. Inhibitory effects of various carboxylic acids on these two forms have been studied. Both forms showed identical behaviour towards the inhibitors studied. Cinnamic acid was found to have the greatest inhibitory effect (Ki = 0·06 mM). When the inhibitory effects of acids from the benzoic acid family and from the cinnamic acid family were compared, it was found that acids which possess a double bond between the benzene ring and the carboxylic function showed the highest inhibitory effect. This inhibitory effect was decreased by substitutions on the benzene ring.The influence of pH on the inhibitory effect of carboxylic acids on palmito PPO has also been investigated. Ki decreased with a decrease in pH. This effect is due to the fact that it is only the undissociated form (AH) of carboxylic acids that is responsible for inhibition of PPO. Inhibition constants (Ki for the AH form have been recalculated and were found to remain constant in the pH range studied (for benzoic acid Ki = 0·14 mM, for cinnamic acid Ki = 0·019 mM, for sorbic acid Ki = 0·15 mM).
    Food Chemistry 01/1997; 59(3):355-360. · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is responsible for browning reactions in fruits and vegetables. In order to inhibit these reactions during processing, the use of chemical inhibitors including thiols such as L-cysteine has been proposed. The effect of this thiol on PPO activity was studied in order to establish if it reacts with quinone and/or directly inhibits the enzyme. The inhibition of palmito PPO (catecholase activity, with 4-methylcatechol as substrate) by L-cysteine was characterized spectrophotometrically. The effect of increasing cysteine concentration with respect to incubation time was measured by polarography and the kinetic parameters calculated. Kinetic analysis using spectrophotometric assays showed a lag period suggesting that there is no quinone accumulation in the reaction mixture. The increase of absorbance at 300 nm observed with u.v.—vis spectra indicated that a colourless compound (thiol—quinone complex) was produced. The plots of log remaining enzyme activity vs incubation time were characterized by two straight lines suggesting two possible inactivation models: (i) the deactivation of one enzyme that proceeds in two steps or (ii) the existence of two isoenzymes that behave differently. We have shown that the inactivation process of PPO by cysteine followed this model: N → X[C] → I where N represents one native form, X represents an intermediate form, the structure of which depends on the cysteine concentration [C], and where I is the completely inactive form of the enzyme. These results showed that there is a direct irreversible inhibition of PPO by cysteine according to a two-step model. The analytical approach illustrated by the present study of palmito PPO inhibition by L-cysteine may be applied to other investigations of mechanisms of enzyme inhibition.
    The international journal of biochemistry & cell biology 04/1996; 28(4):457-463. · 4.89 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 01/1996; 44(11):3457-3460. · 3.11 Impact Factor
  • Photosynthesis Research 01/1995; · 3.15 Impact Factor
  • Photosynthesis Research 01/1995; · 3.15 Impact Factor