M.A. Rotea

University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas, United States

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Publications (81)54.16 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper presents an optimization-based control strategy for the power management of a wind farm with battery storage. The strategy seeks to minimize the error between the power delivered by the wind farm with battery storage and the power demand from an operator. In addition, the strategy attempts to maximize battery life. The control strategy has two main stages. The first stage produces a family of control solutions that minimize the power error subject to the battery constraints over an optimization horizon. These solutions are parameterized by a given value for the state of charge at the end of the optimization horizon. The second stage screens the family of control solutions to select one attaining an optimal balance between power error and battery life. The battery life model used in this stage is a weighted Amp-hour throughput model. The control strategy is modular, allowing for more sophisticated optimization models in the first stage or more elaborate battery life models in the second stage. The strategy is implemented in real time in the framework of model predictive control. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Wind Energy 11/2013; 16(8). · 1.44 Impact Factor
  • H. Borhan, M.A. Rotea, D. Viassolo
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents an optimization-based control strategy for the power management of a wind farm with battery storage. The strategy seeks to minimize the error between the power delivered by the wind farm with battery storage and the power demand from an operator. In addition, the strategy attempts to maximize battery life. The control strategy has two main stages. The first stage produces a family of control solutions that minimize the power error subject to the battery constraints over an optimization horizon. These solutions are parameterized by a given value for the state of charge at the end of the optimization horizon. The second stage screens the family of control solutions to select one attaining an optimal balance between power error and battery life. The battery life model used in this stage is a weighted Amp-hour (Ah) throughput model. The control strategy is modular, allowing for more sophisticated optimization models in the first stage, or more elaborate battery life models in the second stage. The strategy is implemented in real-time in the framework of Model Predictive Control (MPC).
    American Control Conference (ACC), 2012; 06/2012
  • Matthew A. Lackner, Mario A. Rotea
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    ABSTRACT: The application of control techniques to offshore wind turbines has the potential to significantly improve the structural response, and thus reliability, of these systems. Passive and active control is investigated for a floating barge-type wind turbine. Optimal passive parameters are determined using a parametric investigation for a tuned mass damper system. A limited degree of freedom model is identified with synthetic data and used to design a family of controllers using H∞ multivariable loop shaping. The controllers in this family are then implemented in full degree of freedom time domain simulations. The performance of the passive and active control is quantified using the reduction in fatigue loads of the tower base bending moment. The performance is calculated as a function of active power consumption and the stroke of the actuator. The results are compared to the baseline and optimal passive system, and the additional achievable load reduction using active control is quantified. It is shown that the optimized passive system results in tower fore-aft fatigue load reductions of approximately 10% compared to a baseline turbine. For the active control, load reductions of 30% or more are achievable, at the expense of active power and large strokes. Active control is shown to be an effective means of reducing structural loads, and the costs in power and stroke to achieve these reductions are demonstrated.
    Mechatronics. 01/2011; 21(4):704-719.
  • Matthew A. Lackner, Mario A. Rotea
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    ABSTRACT: The application of control techniques to offshore wind turbines has the potential to significantly improve the structural response of these systems. A new simulation tool is developed that can be utilized to model passive, semi-active and active structural control systems in wind turbines. Two independent, single degree of freedom (DOF) tuned mass- damper (TMD) devices are incorporated into a modified version of the aero-elastic code FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures and Turbulence). The TMDs are located in the nacelle of the turbine model, with one TMD translating in the fore-aft direction, and the other in the side-side direction. The equations of motion of the TMDs are incorporated into the source code of FAST, yielding a more realistic system for modeling structural control in wind turbines than has previously been modeled. The stiffness, damping and commanded force of each TMD are controllable through the FAST-Simulink interface, and so idealizations of semi-active and active control approaches can be implemented. A parametric study is performed to determine the optimal parameters of a passive single DOF, fore-aft, TMD system in both a barge-type and monopile support structure. The wind turbine models equipped with TMDs are then simulated and the performance of these new systems is evaluated. The results indicate that passive control approaches can be used to improve the structural response of offshore wind turbines. The results also demonstrate the potential for active control approaches. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Wind Energy 09/2010; 14(3):373 - 388. · 1.44 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Haijun Fang, Zongli Lin, Mario Rotea
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    ABSTRACT: This paper establishes IQC (integral quadratic constraints) based conditions under which an ellipsoid is contractively invariant for a single input linear system under a saturated linear feedback law. Based on these set invariance conditions, the determination of the largest such ellipsoid, for use as an estimate of the domain of attraction, can be formulated and solved as an LMI optimization problem. Such an LMI problem can also be readily adapted for the design of the feedback gain that achieves the largest contractively invariant ellipsoid. While the advantages of the proposed IQC approach remain to be explored, it is shown in this paper that the largest contractively invariant ellipsoid determined by this approach is the same as the one determined by the existing approach based on expressing the saturated linear feedback as a linear differential inclusion (LDI), which is known to lead to non-conservative result in determining the largest contractively invariant ellipsoid for single input systems
    Systems & Control Letters 08/2008; 57:611-619. · 1.67 Impact Factor
  • Carlos Lana, Mario Rotea
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a model predictive control formulation that incorporates trajectory sensitivity to improve the robustness of the conventional model predictive control strategy. A structural control benchmark problem is used to illustrate the potential of the approach. The numerical results suggest that the proposed approach may be a viable option to increase the robustness of the conventional model predictive control strategy without increasing the computation requirements.
    07/2008;
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    C. Lana, M. Rotea
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a model predictive control formulation that incorporates trajectory sensitivity to improve the robustness of the conventional model predictive control strategy. A numerical example is used to illustrate the potential of this approach. The numerical results suggest that the proposed approach may be an alternative to robust model predictive control strategies when the latter leads to excessive computation requirements or conservatism.
    Control & Automation, 2007. MED '07. Mediterranean Conference on; 07/2007
  • MARIO A. ROTEA, RAVI K. PRASANTHT
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    ABSTRACT: A problem of practical importance is to find a linear controller that shapes the closed loop frequency responses in some desirable fashion. When the magnitude of the target shapes is specified, this problem may be cast as that of finding a controller such that several ∞ norms satisfy specified bounds. In this paper we show that, under suitable assumptions, an exact solution to this multiobjective ∞ problem can be obtained. The method we propose requires the solution to: (1) a finite-dimensional linear matrix inequality problem, and (2) a standard single objective ∞ problem for a suitably constructed auxiliary plant. We illustrate the results with a numerical example.
    International Journal of Control. 02/2007; 65(4):699-720.
  • Source
    M. Rotea, C. Lana
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    ABSTRACT: This paper considers a state estimation problem for a discrete-time linear system driven by a Gaussian random process. The second order statistics of the input process and state initial condition are uncertain. However, the probability that the state and input satisfy linear constraints during the estimation interval is known. A minimax estimation problem is formulated to determine an estimator that minimizes the worst-case mean square error criterion, over the uncertain second order statistics, subject to the probability constraints. It is shown that a solution to this constrained state estimation problem is given by a Kalman filter for appropriately chosen input and initial condition models. These models are obtained from a finite dimensional convex optimization problem. The application of this estimator to an aircraft tracking problem quantifies the improvement in estimation accuracy obtained from the inclusion of probability constraints in the minimax formulation.
    Decision and Control, 2005 and 2005 European Control Conference. CDC-ECC '05. 44th IEEE Conference on; 01/2006
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents an algorithm to estimate unknown parameters of parachute models from flight-test data. The algorithm is based on the simultaneous-perturbation-stochastic-approximation method to minimize the prediction error (difference between model output and test data). The algorithm is simple to code and requires only the model output. Analytical gradients are not necessary. The algorithm is used to estimate aerodynamic and apparent mass coefficients for an existing parachute model.
    Journal of Aircraft 09/2005; 42(5). · 0.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, the performance of a prototype standing wave thermoacoustic cooler is optimized using an extremum seeking control (ESC) algorithm. A tunable Helmholtz resonator was developed for a thermoacoustic cooler to change the boundary condition of the standing wave tube. The volume of the resonator is changed by changing the location of a piston on a ball-screw assembly driven by a dc motor. Multiparameter ESC was applied to optimize the cooling power via tuning both the boundary condition (piston location) and the driving frequency. Experiments were conducted for the online optimization under both fixed and varying operating conditions. The experimental results demonstrated the effectiveness of using ESC for maintaining maximum achievable performance. The effect of changing parameters in the ESC algorithm on the transient behavior was also investigated.
    IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology 07/2005; 13(4):527-536. · 2.52 Impact Factor
  • Fernando D’Amato, Mario Rotea
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    ABSTRACT: This work presents an efficient algorithm to solve a structured semidefinite program (SDP) with important applications in the analysis of uncertain linear systems. The solution to this particular SDP gives an upper bound for the maximum singular value of a multidimensional rational matrix function, or linear fractional transformation, over a box of n real parameters. The proposed algorithm is based on a known method for solving semidefinite programs. The key features of the algorithm are low memory requirements, low cost per iteration, and efficient adaptive rules to update algorithm parameters. Proper utilization of the structure of the semidefinite program under consideration leads to an algorithm that reduced the cost per iteration and memory requirements of existing general-purpose SDP solvers by a factor of O(n). Thus, the algorithm in this paper achieves substantial savings in computing resources for problems with a large number of parameters. Additional savings are obtained when the problem data includes block-circulant matrices as is the case in the analysis of uncertain mechanical structures with spatial symmetry.
    Optimization and Engineering 01/2005; 6(2):177-201. · 0.83 Impact Factor
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    Journal of Electronic Imaging 01/2005; 14:013001. · 1.06 Impact Factor
  • Source
    M. Rotea, C. Lana, D. Viassolo
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    ABSTRACT: Colorimetric models are used to predict printer output colors from a set of toner control values. The so-called Neugebauer model predicts the spectral reflectance of the printed colors. This paper presents an algorithm for estimating the parameters of the Neugebauer model from a set of measured reflectances. The algorithm requires a bound on the magnitude of the output reflectance errors. A case study using a high-end color printer suggests that this algorithm yields robust spectral models, which are less sensitive (to undesirable variations in the data) than the models obtained with the methods of least squares and total least squares.
    Decision and Control, 2003. Proceedings. 42nd IEEE Conference on; 01/2004
  • The Eleventh Color Imaging Conference: Color Science and Engineering Systems, Technologies, Applications, CIC 2003, November 3, 2003, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA; 01/2003
  • M. Corless, S.-M. Swei, M. A. Rotea
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    ABSTRACT: We consider the problem of robust stabilization of a class of systems which contain several uncertain/non-linear terms. We present two order reduction procedures which permit one to reduce the stabilization problem for the original system to a stabilization problem for a system containing fewer state variables and possibly fewer uncertain terms.
    International Journal of Control 01/2002; 75(2):69-79. · 1.01 Impact Factor
  • M.A. Rotea, D.E. Viassolo
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    ABSTRACT: This paper investigates a sufficient condition given by El Ghaoui (1993 ) for the simultaneous stabilization of a collection of linear time-invariant plants via static output-feedback control. Our main result shows that for square plants, with no purely imaginary transmission zeros, the sufficient condition will not hold if there is a plant with nonminimum phase transfer matrix G(s) or with singular high-frequency gain matrix lim<sub>s→∞</sub>sG(s)
    American Control Conference, 2001. Proceedings of the 2001; 02/2001
  • M. Rotea, F. D'Amato
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    ABSTRACT: Presents an optimized algorithm to calculate a bound on the largest frequency response function that results when n parameters may vary simultaneously. The bound is obtained as the solution to a convex optimization problem known as semidefinite programming problem. The proposed algorithm is based on a known interior-point method for solving semidefinite programs. Proper utilization of the structure, of the specific semidefinite program, leads to an algorithm whose cost grows as O(n<sup>3</sup>) flops per iteration. Available general-purpose algorithms, do not utilize the specific problem structure, and their cost grows as O(n<sup>4</sup>) flops per iteration. Thus, the optimized algorithm in the paper achieves a cost reduction proportional to n, which is substantial for problems with hundreds of parameters. Additional savings are obtained when the frequency response function under study comes from a system with nominal circular symmetry
    American Control Conference, 2001. Proceedings of the 2001; 02/2001
  • D.E. Viassolo, M.A. Rotea
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    ABSTRACT: The problem of finding a controller to achieve good levels of closed-loop performance for all the systems in a given set is addressed. An efficient two-step methodology to compute a digital linear periodic controller to solve this problem is presented. First, a linear periodic controller that stabilizes all systems is obtained. Second, the closed-loop performance of this controller is improved using are iterative linear-matrix-inequality (LMI) based algorithm
    Circuits and Systems, 2001. MWSCAS 2001. Proceedings of the 44th IEEE 2001 Midwest Symposium on; 02/2001
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This work presents new results for analysis of systems with repeated monotonic or slope restricted nonlinearities. We first give new integral quadratic constraints (IQCs) that are satisfied by the inputs and outputs of diagonal operators with equal, monotonic or slope restricted, diagonal entries. Then, we present new analysis results for systems with repeated nonlinearities, obtained using the new IQCs. For the type of nonlinearities considered in this work, the new results are less conservative than previously known results. The computation of the new conditions is discussed. The results in this paper apply also to problems with nonrepeated nonlinearities whenever these are representable as the interconnection of multiple repeated nonlinearities and a constant matrix.
    Automatica 01/2001; 37:739-747. · 2.92 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
54.16 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010–2013
    • University of Texas at Dallas
      • Department of Mechanical Engineering
      Richardson, Texas, United States
  • 2006–2008
    • University of Massachusetts Amherst
      • Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
      Amherst Center, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1991–2008
    • Purdue University
      • School of Aeronautics and Astronautics
      West Lafayette, Indiana, United States
  • 2001
    • Xerox Corporation
      Norwalk, Connecticut, United States
  • 1997
    • United Technologies Research Center
      Hartford, Connecticut, United States
  • 1995–1997
    • University of Virginia
      • Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
      Charlottesville, VA, United States
  • 1990–1992
    • University of Michigan
      • Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS)
      Ann Arbor, MI, United States
  • 1988–1991
    • University of Minnesota Twin Cities
      • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
      Minneapolis, MN, United States
    • University of Minnesota Duluth
      • Department of Electrical Engineering
      Duluth, Minnesota, United States