Irmgard U. Willcockson

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas, United States

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Publications (11)9.2 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Online courses will play a key role in the high-volume Informatics education required to train the personnel that will be necessary to fulfill the health IT needs of the country. Online courses can cause feelings of isolation in students. A common way to address these feelings is to hold synchronous online "chats" for students. Conventional chats, however, can be confusing and impose a high extrinsic cognitive load on their participants that hinders the learning process. In this paper we present a qualitative analysis that shows the causes of this high cognitive load and our solution through the use of a moderated chat system.
    AMIA ... Annual Symposium proceedings / AMIA Symposium. AMIA Symposium 01/2010; 2010:296-300.
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    Irmgard U Willcockson, Cynthia L Phelps
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    ABSTRACT: FELT PROBLEM: Technology integration continues to be a challenge for health science faculty. While students expect emerging technologies to be used in the classroom, faculty members desire a strategic process to incorporate technology for the students' benefit. OUR SOLUTION: We have developed a model that provides faculty a strategy for integrating emerging technologies into the classroom. The model is grounded in student learning and may be applied to any technology. We present the model alongside examples from faculty who have used it to incorporate technology into their health sciences classrooms.
    Medical Education Online 01/2010; 15.
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    ABSTRACT: To predict student performance in an introductory graduate-level biomedical informatics course from application data. A predictive model built through retrospective review of student records using hierarchical binary logistic regression with half of the sample held back for cross-validation. The model was also validated against student data from a similar course at a second institution. Earning an A grade (Mastery) or a C grade (Failure) in an introductory informatics course. The authors analyzed 129 student records at the University of Texas School of Health Information Sciences at Houston (SHIS) and 106 at Oregon Health and Science University Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology (DMICE). In the SHIS cross-validation sample, the Graduate Record Exam verbal score (GRE-V) correctly predicted Mastery in 69.4%. Undergraduate grade point average (UGPA) and underrepresented minority status (URMS) predicted 81.6% of Failures. At DMICE, GRE-V, UGPA, and prior graduate degree significantly correlated with Mastery. Only GRE-V was a significant independent predictor of Mastery at both institutions. There were too few URMS students and Failures at DMICE to analyze. Course Mastery strongly predicted program performance defined as final cumulative GPA at SHIS (n=19, r=0.634, r2=0.40, p=0.0036) and DMICE (n=106, r=0.603, r2=0.36, p<0.001). The authors identified predictors of performance in an introductory informatics course including GRE-V, UGPA and URMS. Course performance was a very strong predictor of overall program performance. Findings may be useful for selecting students for admission and identifying students at risk for Failure as early as possible.
    Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association 08/2009; 16(6):837-46. · 3.57 Impact Factor
  • Irmgard U Willcockson, Cynthia L Phelps
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    ABSTRACT: Many different strategies are used to recruit students into scientific research careers, including neuroscience research. These strategies are rarely based on knowledge about students; instead, activities are selected based on their ease of implementation. The goal of the LEARN Project is to encourage high school students into mental health science research using the theme of learning and memory. One intervention the authors developed is five Web-based biographies introducing students to contemporary neuroscientist role models studying learning and memory. To guide the design of this intervention, the authors created a survey to determine where students obtain career information and who and what influences their career selection. In a convenience sample of 124 students, the authors found that almost all students use the Internet for information about careers, in addition to consulting family members and teachers. Students' career selections are influenced most by family members, teachers, and people already in the field. The most important factors students look for in their future career are money, fun, and a good match between current interests and future careers. The data affirm the value of outreach efforts that go beyond students to include a broader audience of parents and teachers who play a critical role in career selection.
    The Neuroscientist 01/2005; 10(6):594-7. · 5.63 Impact Factor
  • Yanko Michea, Irmgard Willcockson, Cynthia Phelps
    Proceedings of WebNet 2001 - World Conference on the WWW and Internet, Orlando, Florida, October 23-27, 2001; 01/2001
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    ABSTRACT: Background and Problem: Studies have demonstrated that flu shots are an effective method to control flu infection. However, statistics reveal that only about 68% of people get vaccinated in the U.S. every year. We wanted to develop and evaluate an intervention to increase influenza vaccination rate. [See PDF for complete abstract]
    Advances in Teaching and Learning Day Abstracts.
  • Susan M. Shea, Robert Vogler, Cynthia L Phelps, Irmgard U. Willcockson
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The use of podcasts has emerged as an important tool for use in education. This is especially relevant in nursing schools with the shortage of nursing faculty. The use of podcasts allows the instructor to provide lectures and other course content to students. [See PDF for complete abstract]
    Advances in Teaching and Learning Day Abstracts.
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Throughout the United States, there are massive initiatives in place to reform healthcare through the implementation of electronic health records. The goals are to improve patient care through improved access to records, the improvement of business and reimbursement processes, streamlining of clinician workflows for increased efficiency, and reducing the variability in the delivery of patient care. [See PDF for complete abstract]
    Advances in Teaching and Learning Day Abstracts.
  • Irmgard U. Willcockson, Pamela Bozzo, Jorge R Herskovic, Elmer V Bernstam
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Foundations of Health Information Sciences I is the first class many students take to introduce them to the field of health informatics. It is completely online, and uses optional weekly text-only chats to provide real time interaction between faculty and students. Chat sessions were very disorganized and difficult to follow, both real time and on the transcript. Research suggests that the disorganization contributes to cognitive load. [See PDF for complete abstract]
    Advances in Teaching and Learning Day Abstracts.
  • Ololade G. Coker, Robert Vogler, Irmgard U. Willcockson, Cynthia L Phelps
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    ABSTRACT: Background: During the orientation process, new students are often inundated with manuals, maps, and other materials essential to their success as students. The experience can leave students feeling overwhelmed, unable to sift through the substantial amount of information that has been given to them. Wikis, in contrast, are well-suited for facilitating userinteraction with vast amounts of diverse information. [See PDF for complete abstract]
    Advances in Teaching and Learning Day Abstracts.
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: The United States is currently experiencing increased prevalence of obesity. This is a particular problem amongst children who require dietary and activity behavioral change to mitigate this problem. The use of computer games as channels to motivate health behavior in children is increasing. Casual games are a subset of computer games that are simple in design, easy to access and play, popular with children, and have the potential to be effective for drill and practice learning. [See PDF for complete abstract]
    Advances in Teaching and Learning Day Abstracts.