Berk Hess

University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, United States

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Publications (28)67.84 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The accuracy of electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics advanced tremendously with the introduction of particle-mesh Ewald (PME) summation almost 20 years ago. Lattice summation electrostatics is now the de facto standard for most types of biomolecular simulations, and in particular, for lipid bilayers, it has been a critical improvement due to the large charges typically present in zwitterionic lipid headgroups. In contrast, Lennard-Jones interactions have continued to be handled with increasingly longer cutoffs, partly because few alternatives have been available despite significant difficulties in tuning cutoffs and parameters to reproduce lipid properties. Here, we present a new Lennard-Jones PME implementation applied to lipid bilayers. We confirm that long-range contributions are well approximated by dispersion corrections in simple systems such as pentadecane (which makes parameters transferable), but for inhomogeneous and anisotropic systems such as lipid bilayers there are large effects on surface tension, resulting in up to 5.5% deviations in area per lipid and order parameters—far larger than many differences for which reparameterization has been attempted. We further propose an approximation for combination rules in reciprocal space that significantly reduces the computational cost of Lennard-Jones PME and makes accurate treatment of all nonbonded interactions competitive with simulations employing long cutoffs. These results could potentially have broad impact on important applications such as membrane proteins and free energy calculations.
    Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation 07/2013; 9(8):3527–3537. · 5.39 Impact Factor
  • Szilárd Páll, Berk Hess
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    ABSTRACT: Calculating interactions or correlations between pairs of particles is typically the most time-consuming task in particle simulation or correlation analysis. Straightforward implementations using a double loop over particle pairs have traditionally worked well, especially since compilers usually do a good job of unrolling the inner loop. In order to reach high performance on modern CPU and accelerator architectures, single-instruction multiple-data (SIMD) parallelization has become essential. Avoiding memory bottlenecks is also increasingly important and requires reducing the ratio of memory to arithmetic operations. Moreover, when pairs only interact within a certain cut-off distance, good SIMD utilization can only be achieved by reordering input and output data, which quickly becomes a limiting factor. Here we present an algorithm for SIMD parallelization based on grouping a fixed number of particles, e.g. 2, 4, or 8, into spatial clusters. Calculating all interactions between particles in a pair of such clusters improves data reuse compared to the traditional scheme and results in a more efficient SIMD parallelization. Adjusting the cluster size allows the algorithm to map to SIMD units of various widths. This flexibility not only enables fast and efficient implementation on current CPUs and accelerator architectures like GPUs or Intel MIC, but it also makes the algorithm future-proof. We present the algorithm with an application to molecular dynamics simulations, where we can also make use of the effective buffering the method introduces.
    Computer Physics Communications 06/2013; · 2.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The training event includes tutorials on basic and advanced usage of two major packages for Molecular Dynamics simulations – GROMACS and AMBER – with focus on their application to modelling of biomolecular systems. The following sessions will include the presentation of two portals for automated submission of jobs developed by the WeNMR (wenmr.eu) and ScalaLife (scalalife.eu).
    EGI COMMUNITY FORUM 2013; 04/2013
  • Article: GROMACS 4.5
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    ABSTRACT: Motivation: Molecular simulation has historically been a low-throughput technique, but faster computers and increasing amounts of genomic and structural data are changing this by enabling large-scale automated simulation of, for instance, many conformers or mutants of biomolecules with or without a range of ligands. At the same time, advances in performance and scaling now make it possible to model complex biomolecular interaction and function in a manner directly testable by experiment. These applications share a need for fast and efficient software that can be deployed on massive scale in clusters, web servers, distributed computing or cloud resources. Results: Here, we present a range of new simulation algorithms and features developed during the past 4 years, leading up to the GROMACS 4.5 software package. The software now automatically handles wide classes of biomolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, and comes with all commonly used force fields for these molecules built-in. GROMACS supports several implicit solvent models, as well as new free-energy algorithms, and the software now uses multithreading for efficient parallelization even on low-end systems, including windows-based workstations. Together with hand-tuned assembly kernels and state-of-the-art parallelization, this provides extremely high performance and cost efficiency for high-throughput as well as massively parallel simulations. Availability: GROMACS is an open source and free software available from http://www.gromacs.org. Contact: erik.lindahl@scilifelab.se Supplementary information:Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
    Bioinformatics. 04/2013; 29(7):845-854.
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    ABSTRACT: MOTIVATION: Molecular simulation has historically been a low-throughput technique, but faster computers and increasing amounts of genomic and structural data are changing this by enabling large-scale automated simulation of, for instance, many conformers or mutants of biomolecules with or without a range of ligands. At the same time, advances in performance and scaling now make it possible to model complex biomolecular interaction and function in a manner directly testable by experiment. These applications share a need for fast and efficient software that can be deployed on massive scale in clusters, web servers, distributed computing or cloud resources. RESULTS: Here, we present a range of new simulation algorithms and features developed during the past 4 years, leading up to the GROMACS 4.5 software package. The software now automatically handles wide classes of biomolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, and comes with all commonly used force fields for these molecules built-in. GROMACS supports several implicit solvent models, as well as new free-energy algorithms, and the software now uses multithreading for efficient parallelization even on low-end systems, including windows-based workstations. Together with hand-tuned assembly kernels and state-of-the-art parallelization, this provides extremely high performance and cost efficiency for high-throughput as well as massively parallel simulations. AVAILABILITY: GROMACS is an open source and free software available from http://www.gromacs.org. CONTACT: erik.lindahl@scilifelab.se SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
    Bioinformatics 02/2013; · 5.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cellular lipid membranes are spatially inhomogeneous soft materials. Materials properties such as pressure and surface tension thus show important microscopic-scale variation that is critical to many biological functions. We present a means to calculate pressure and surface tension in a 3D-resolved manner within molecular-dynamics simulations and show how such measurements can yield important insight. We also present the first corrections to local virial and pressure fields to account for the constraints typically used in lipid simulations that otherwise cause problems in highly oriented systems such as bilayers. Based on simulations of an asymmetric bacterial ion channel in a POPC bilayer, we demonstrate how 3D-resolved pressure can probe for both short-range and long-range effects from the protein on the membrane environment. We also show how surface tension is a sensitive metric for inter-leaflet equilibrium and can be used to detect even subtle imbalances between bilayer leaflets in a membrane-protein simulation. Since surface tension is known to modulate the function of many proteins, this effect is an important consideration for predictions of ion channel function. We outline a strategy by which our local pressure measurements, which we make available within a version of the GROMACS simulation package, may be used to design optimally equilibrated membrane-protein simulations.
    Chemistry and physics of lipids 01/2013; · 2.15 Impact Factor
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    01/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: The gating of voltage-gated ion channels is controlled by the arginine-rich S4 helix of the voltage-sensor domain moving in response to an external potential. Recent studies have suggested that S4 moves in three to four steps to open the conducting pore, thus visiting several intermediate conformations during gating. However, the exact conformational changes are not known in detail. For instance, it has been suggested that there is a local rotation in the helix corresponding to short segments of a 3[Formula: see text]-helix moving along S4 during opening and closing. Here, we have explored the energetics of the transition between the fully open state (based on the X-ray structure) and the first intermediate state towards channel closing (C[Formula: see text]), modeled from experimental constraints. We show that conformations within 3 Å of the X-ray structure are obtained in simulations starting from the C[Formula: see text] model, and directly observe the previously suggested sliding 3[Formula: see text]-helix region in S4. Through systematic free energy calculations, we show that the C[Formula: see text] state is a stable intermediate conformation and determine free energy profiles for moving between the states without constraints. Mutations indicate several residues in a narrow hydrophobic band in the voltage sensor contribute to the barrier between the open and C[Formula: see text] states, with F233 in the S2 helix having the largest influence. Substitution for smaller amino acids reduces the transition cost, while introduction of a larger ring increases it, largely confirming experimental activation shift results. There is a systematic correlation between the local aromatic ring rotation, the arginine barrier crossing, and the corresponding relative free energy. In particular, it appears to be more advantageous for the F233 side chain to rotate towards the extracellular side when arginines cross the hydrophobic region.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(10):e45880. · 3.73 Impact Factor
  • Biophysical Journal 01/2012; 102(3):13-. · 3.67 Impact Factor
  • David van der Spoel, Berk Hess
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    ABSTRACT: Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations form a powerful tool that is complementary to experiments and theory. They allow detailed investigations of both biological and chemical systems at the atomic level at timescales ranging from femtoseconds to milliseconds. Mechanisms and processes not accessible to experimental techniques can be followed in ‘real time’, and hypotheses based on experiments or theoretical arguments can be tested. Limits on the accuracy of results are mainly due to the physical models, the ratio of the complexity of the problem and the amount of computer time. Here, we review the state of the art in MD simulations with a focus on imminent challenges for the GROMACS (GROningen MAchine for Chemical Simulation) software. New hardware puts new requirements on software, while the breadth of applications and the amount of physical models implemented are increasing rapidly, highlighting shortcomings in the architecture of the programs. We sketch a road map for a popular scientific software package and discuss some of the choices to be made. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2011 1 710–715 DOI: 10.1002/wcms.50
    Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Computational Molecular Science. 04/2011; 1(5):710 - 715.
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    ABSTRACT: The activation of voltage-gated ion channels is controlled by the S4 helix, with arginines every third residue. The x-ray structures are believed to reflect an open-inactivated state, and models propose combinations of translation, rotation, and tilt to reach the resting state. Recently, experiments and simulations have independently observed occurrence of 3(10)-helix in S4. This suggests S4 might make a transition from α- to 3(10)-helix in the gating process. Here, we show 3(10)-helix structure between Q1 and R3 in the S4 segment of a voltage sensor appears to facilitate the early stage of the motion toward a down state. We use multiple microsecond-steered molecular simulations to calculate the work required for translating S4 both as α-helix and transformed to 3(10)-helix. The barrier appears to be caused by salt-bridge reformation simultaneous to R4 passing the F233 hydrophobic lock, and it is almost a factor-two lower with 3(10)-helix. The latter facilitates translation because R2/R3 line up to face E183/E226, which reduces the requirement to rotate S4. This is also reflected in a lower root mean-square deviation distortion of the rest of the voltage sensor. This supports the 3(10) hypothesis, and could explain some of the differences between the open-inactivated- versus activated-states.
    Biophysical Journal 03/2011; 100(6):1446-54. · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: High-performance implementations of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations play an important role in the study of macromolecules. Recent advances in both hardware and simulation software have extended the accessible time scales significantly, but the more complex algorithms used in many codes today occasionally make it difficult to understand the program flow and data structures without at least some knowledge about the underlying ideas used to improve performance. In this review, we discuss some of the currently most important areas of algorithm improvement to accelerate MD, including floating-point maths, techniques to accelerate nonbonded interactions, and methods to allow multiple or extended time steps. There is also a strong trend of increased parallelization on different levels, including both distributed memory domain decomposition, stream processing algorithms running, e.g., on graphics processing units hardware, and last but not least techniques to decouple simulations to enable massive parallelism on next-generation supercomputers or distributed computing. We describe some of the impacts these algorithms are having in current performance, and also how we believe they can be combined in the future. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2011 1 93–108 DOI: 10.1002/wcms.3
    Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Computational Molecular Science. 01/2011; 1(1):93 - 108.
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    ABSTRACT: Several GPU-based algorithms have been developed to accelerate biomolecular simulations, but although they provide benefits over single-core implementations, they have not been able to surpass the performance of state-of-the art SIMD CPU implementations (e.g. GROMACS), not to mention efficient scaling. Here, we present a heterogenous parallelization that utilizes both CPU and GPU resources efficiently. A novel fixed-particle-number sub-cell algorithm for non-bonded force calculation was developed. The algorithm uses the SIMD width as algorithmic work unit, it is intrinsically future-proof since it can be adapted to future hardware. The CUDA non-bonded kernel implementation achieves up to 60\% work-efficiency, 1.5 IPC, and 95\% L1 cache utilization. On the CPU OpenMP-parallelized SSE-accelerated code runs overlapping with GPU execution. Fully automated dynamic inter-process as well as CPU-GPU load balancing is employed. We achieve threefold speedup compared to equivalent GROMACS CPU code and show good strong and weak scaling. To the best of our knowledge this the fastest GPU molecular dynamics implementation presented to date.
    Conference on High Performance Computing Networking, Storage and Analysis - Companion Volume, SC 2011, Seattle, WA, USA, November 12-18, 2011; 01/2011
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    ABSTRACT: Biomolecular simulation is a core application on supercomputers, but it is exceptionally difficult to achieve the strong scaling necessary to reach biologically relevant timescales. Here, we present a new paradigm for parallel adaptive molecular dynamics and a publicly available implementation: Copernicus. This framework combines performance-leading molecular dynamics parallelized on three levels (SIMD, threads, and message-passing) with kinetic clustering, statistical model building and real-time result monitoring. Copernicus enables execution as single parallel jobs with automatic resource allocation. Even for a small protein such as villin (9,864 atoms), Copernicus exhibits near-linear strong scaling from 1 to 5,376 AMD cores. Starting from extended chains we observe structures 0.6 Å from the native state within 30h, and achieve sufficient sampling to predict the native state without a priori knowledge after 80--90h. To match Copernicus' efficiency, a classical simulation would have to exceed 50 microseconds per day, currently infeasible even with custom hardware designed for simulations.
    Conference on High Performance Computing Networking, Storage and Analysis, SC 2011, Seattle, WA, USA, November 12-18, 2011; 01/2011
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    ABSTRACT: We have studied the partitioning of amphiphilic peptides at the air-water interface. The free energy of adsorption from bulk to interface was calculated by determining the potential of mean force via atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. To this end a method is introduced to restrain or constrain the center of mass of a group of molecules in a periodic system. The model amphiphilic peptides are composed of alternating valine and asparagine residues. The decomposition of the free energy difference between the bulk and interface is studied for different peptide block lengths. Our analysis revealed that for short amphiphilic peptides the surface driving force dominantly stems from the dehydration of hydrophobic side chains. The only opposing force is associated with the loss of orientational freedom of the peptide at the interface. For the peptides studied, the free energy difference scales linearly with the size of the molecule, since the peptides mainly adopt extended conformations both in bulk and at the interface. The free energy difference depends strongly on the water model, which can be rationalized through the hydration thermodynamics of hydrophobic solutes. Finally, we measured the reduction of the surface tension associated with complete coverage of the interface with peptides.
    The Journal of Physical Chemistry B 09/2010; 114(34):11093-101. · 3.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: CHARMM27 is a widespread and popular force field for biomolecular simulation, and several recent algorithms such as implicit solvent models have been developed specifically for it. We have here implemented the CHARMM force field and all necessary extended functional forms in the GROMACS molecular simulation package, to make CHARMM-specific features available and to test them in combination with techniques for extended time steps, to make all major force fields available for comparison studies in GROMACS, and to test various solvent model optimizations, in particular the effect of Lennard-Jones interactions on hydrogens. The implementation has full support both for CHARMM-specific features such as multiple potentials over the same dihedral angle and the grid-based energy correction map on the , ψ protein backbone dihedrals, as well as all GROMACS features such as virtual hydrogen interaction sites that enable 5 fs time steps. The medium-to-long time effects of both the correction maps and virtual sites have been tested by performing a series of 100 ns simulations using different models for water representation, including comparisons between CHARMM and traditional TIP3P. Including the correction maps improves sampling of near native-state conformations in our systems, and to some extent it is even able to refine distorted protein conformations. Finally, we show that this accuracy is largely maintained with a new implicit solvent implementation that works with virtual interaction sites, which enables performance in excess of 250 ns/day for a 900-atom protein on a quad-core desktop computer.
    Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation - J CHEM THEORY COMPUT. 01/2010; 6(2).
  • Biophysical Journal 01/2010; 98(3). · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aqueous solutions of a light (Nd3+), a middle (Gd3+), and a heavy (Yb3+) lanthanide ion were studied using ab initio based flexible and polarizable analytical potentials in classical molecular dynamics simulations to describe their thermodynamic, structural, and dynamic features. To avoid the spurious demise of O-H bonds, it was necessary to reparametrize an existing water model, which resulted in an improved description of pure water. The good agreement of the results from the simulations with the experimental hydration enthalpies, the Ln(III)-water radial distribution functions, and the water-exchange rates validated the potentials, though the r(Ln-Ow) distances were 6% longer than the experimentally determined values. A nona-coordinated state was found for Nd3+ in 95% of the simulation, with a tricapped trigonal prism (TCTP) geometry; the corresponding water-exchange mechanism was found to be of dissociative interchange (Id) character through a short-lived octa-coordinated transition state in a square antiprism (SQA) geometry. An octa-coordinated state in SQA geometry was found for Yb3+ in 99% of the simulation, and the observed exchange events exhibited characteristics of an interchange (I) mechanism. For Gd3+ an equilibrium was observed between 8-fold SQA and 9-fold TCTP coordinated states that was maintained by the frequent exchange of a water molecule from the first hydration shell with the bulk, thus producing significant deviations from the ideal geometries, and a fast exchange rate. Though strong water-water interactions prevented a full alignment of the dipoles to the ion's electric field, the screening was found large enough as to limit its range to 5 A; water molecules further apart from the ion were found to have the same dipole as the molecules in the bulk, and a random orientation. The interplay among the water-ion and the water-water interactions determined the different coordination numbers and the different dynamics of the water exchange in the first hydration shell for each ion.
    The Journal of Physical Chemistry B 05/2009; 113(20):7270-81. · 3.61 Impact Factor
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    J Chem Theory Comput. 01/2008; 4(3):435-447.
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    ABSTRACT: This article describes the software suite GROMACS (Groningen MAchine for Chemical Simulation) that was developed at the University of Groningen, The Netherlands, in the early 1990s. The software, written in ANSI C, originates from a parallel hardware project, and is well suited for parallelization on processor clusters. By careful optimization of neighbor searching and of inner loop performance, GROMACS is a very fast program for molecular dynamics simulation. It does not have a force field of its own, but is compatible with GROMOS, OPLS, AMBER, and ENCAD force fields. In addition, it can handle polarizable shell models and flexible constraints. The program is versatile, as force routines can be added by the user, tabulated functions can be specified, and analyses can be easily customized. Nonequilibrium dynamics and free energy determinations are incorporated. Interfaces with popular quantum-chemical packages (MOPAC, GAMES-UK, GAUSSIAN) are provided to perform mixed MM/QM simulations. The package includes about 100 utility and analysis programs. GROMACS is in the public domain and distributed (with source code and documentation) under the GNU General Public License. It is maintained by a group of developers from the Universities of Groningen, Uppsala, and Stockholm, and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz. Its Web site is http://www.gromacs.org.
    Journal of Computational Chemistry 01/2006; 26(16):1701-18. · 3.84 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

6k Citations
67.84 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • University of Virginia
      • Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics
      Charlottesville, VA, United States
  • 2011–2012
    • KTH Royal Institute of Technology
      Tukholma, Stockholm, Sweden
    • AlbaNova University Center
      Tukholma, Stockholm, Sweden
    • Stockholm University
      • Center for Biomembrane Research
      Tukholma, Stockholm, Sweden
  • 2010
    • Koc University
      • College of Engineering
      İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
  • 2006
    • Uppsala University
      • Department of Cell and Molecular Biology
      Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden
  • 2005–2006
    • Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research
      Mayence, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
  • 1998–2004
    • University of Groningen
      • Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute (GBB)
      Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands