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Publications (8)5.84 Total impact

  • T. Sofilić, A. Rastovčan-Mioč, Z. Smit
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    ABSTRACT: As the accumulation of PCDDs/Fs in the natural environment poses a great threat, and the pollution of the environment with these highly toxic compounds from various emitters needs to be prevented, many countries have conducted an inventory of industrial sources and their emissions in order to obtain better insight into the share of particular sources in the total emission of PCDDs/Fs and to develop strategies to reduce these emissions.Metallurgical processes like sintering of iron ore, production of steel and non-ferrous and light metals from scrap material belong to a group of stationary PCDDs/Fs emitters and their share in the total PCDDs/Fs emission into the environment is very significant. The relative significance of particular metallurgical processes varies from country to country, depending on the nature of a particular process, installed capacities and annual output levels.As the modern approach to observing the environment includes preventive measures, as opposed to corrective post-event measures that were common practice in the past, the owners/operators of metallurgical processes are developing and introducing pollution monitoring and surveillance systems, based on which they take appropriate measures.One of the frequently applied measures is to build and implement the ISO 14001 environmental management system that very efficiently runs production processes along with maintenance of environmental protection on a daily basis. Since the adoption of the ISO 14001 environmental management system is a voluntary decision to be made by each organization, in 1996 the European Union adopted, for the purpose of environmental protection and pollution prevention, the Directive 96/61 EC or IPPC Directive on Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control (IPPC) requiring from industrial installations, depending on their type and output level, to obtain environmental permits to run production processes using best available techniques, thus maintaining daily care for environmental protection and preservation. This Directive integrates control of emissions and overall impact of industrial installations on the environment, meaning recognition of the entire impact from particular industrial processes on the environment (air, water, soil, waste, noise, use of raw materials, energy efficiency, prevention of accidents, etc.). The IPPC Directive has introduced a system of authorization (environmental permit) that needs to be obtained in order to perform business activities and run processes using the best available techniques (BAT).Taking into account the harmful impact of PCDDs/Fs on the environment, and their unavoidability in metallurgical processes, a series of methods has been developed for their partial prevention or at least reduction of their concentration in smoke gas discharge, and thus prevent environmental pollution through these very harmful compounds. In order to prevent the occurrence of PCDDs/Fs metallurgical processes often use methods based on the principle of selective catalyst reduction. For removal of the already generated PCDDs/Fs from waste gases methods of thermal decomposition at high temperatures or various sorption, i. e. "dry" and "wet" cleaning techniques are used.As the implementation of the IPPC Directive is a complex procedure requiring highly educated experts, significant investments into production processes and their modernization, or sometimeseven replacement, steel shops need to timely prepare themselves for the obligations in order to harmonize the existing regulation with the requirements of the IPPC Directive.The requirements of the Directive have to be studied thoroughly. The required steps have to be carefully thought through, previously identifying the cost and time frame necessary to bring the existing electric arc furnace (EAF) steel production processes into conformance with the requirements of the IPPC Directive.The paper discusses the requirements of the IPPC Directive that are imposed on the steel business owners/operators, with a special review of the PCDDs/Fs emission. It also presents the ways in which the IPPC Directive requirements concerning these highly toxic pollutants can be fulfilled, ensuring conditions to obtain environmental permits to run this activity once the Directive has entered into force.
    Kemija u Industriji. 01/2008;
  • T. Sofilić, A. Rastovčan-Mioč, Z. Šmit
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    ABSTRACT: As the accumulation of PCDDs/Fs in the natural environment poses a great threat, and the pollution of the environment with these highly toxic compounds from various emitters needs to be prevented, many countries have conducted an inventory of industrial sources and their emissions in order to obtain better insight into the share of particular sources in the total emission of PCDDs/Fs and to develop strategies to reduce these emissions. Metallurgical processes like sintering of iron ore, production of steel and non-ferrous and light metals from scrap material belong to a group of stationary PCDDs/Fs emitters and their share in the total PCDDs/Fs emission into the environment is very significant. The relative significance of particular metallurgical processes varies from country to country, depending on the nature of a particular process, installed capacities and annual output levels. As the modern approach to observing the environment includes preventive measures, as opposed to corrective post-event measures that were common practice in the past, the owners/operators of metallurgical processes are developing and introducing pollution monitoring and surveillance systems, based on which they take appropriate measures. One of the frequently applied measures is to build and implement the ISO 14001 environmental management system that very efficiently runs production processes along with maintenance of environmental protection on a daily basis. Since the adoption of the ISO 14001 environmental management system is a voluntary decision to be made by each organization, in 1996 the European Union adopted, for the purpose of environmental protection and pollution prevention, the Directive 96/61 EC or IPPC Directive on Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control (IPPC) requiring from industrial installations, depending on their type and output level, to obtain environmental permits to run production processes using best available techniques, thus maintaining daily care for environmental protection and preservation. This Directive integrates control of emissions and overall impact of industrial installations on the environment, meaning recognition of the entire impact from particular industrial processes on the environment (air, water, soil, waste, noise, use of raw materials, energy efficiency, prevention of accidents, etc.). The IPPC Directive has introduced a system of authorization (environmental permit) that needs to be obtained in order to perform business activities and run processes using the best available techniques (BAT). Taking into account the harmful impact of PCDDs/Fs on the environment, and their unavoidability in metallurgical processes, a series of methods has been developed for their partial prevention or at least reduction of their concentration in smoke gas discharge, and thus prevent environmental pollution through these very harmful compounds. In order to prevent the occurrence of PCDDs/Fs metallurgical processes often use methods based on the principle of selective catalyst reduction. For removal of the already generated PCDDs/Fs from waste gases methods of thermal decomposition at high temperatures or various sorption, i. e. "dry" and "wet" cleaning techniques are used. As the implementation of the IPPC Directive is a complex procedure requiring highly educated experts, significant investments into production processes and their modernization, or sometimes even replacement, steel shops need to timely prepare themselves for the obligations in order to harmonize the existing regulation with the requirements of the IPPC Directive. The requirements of the Directive have to be studied thoroughly. The required steps have to be carefully thought through, previously identifying the cost and time frame necessary to bring the existing electric arc furnace (EAF) steel production processes into conformance with the requirements of the IPPC Directive. The paper discusses the requirements of the IPPC Directive that are imposed on the steel business owners/operators, with a special review of the PCDDs/Fs emission. It also presents the ways in which the IPPC Directive requirements concerning these highly toxic pollutants can be fulfilled, ensuring conditions to obtain environmental permits to run this activity once the Directive has entered into force.
    Chemistry in industry (kui@zg.t-com.hr); Vol.57 No.1. 01/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: This study was carried out to determine the appropriate treatment of electric arc furnace (EAF) dust prior to permanent disposal. The total heavy metal content as well as heavy metal leaching from EAF dust was investigated in five composite samples obtained from three Croatian and Slovenian steelworks. In order to recover zinc and reduce its leaching from the dust, all five samples were submitted to alkaline extraction with 10 M NaOH. Reduction of Cr (VI) to Cr(III) was conducted using FeSO4 x 7H2O solution. The elements Mn, Fe, Cu, Ni, and notably Zn and Pb, exhibited highest mobility during toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). Comparing to TCLP extracts of initial EAF dust, zinc was found to be over 15 times lower and lead over 200 times lower in TCLP extracts of EAF dust processed by the alkaline leaching method. Since Cr (VI) exceeded its permissible level in the DIN 38414-S4 extracts of both initial and alkaline digested dust, its reduction to Cr (III) prior to permanent disposal is necessary. The recovery of zinc from EAF dust treated with alkaline agent ranged from 50.3% to 73.2%. According to phase analysis, recovery yield showed dependence on zincite/franklinite ratio. The results of the study indicate that permanent disposal of EAF dust require the following procedure: alkaline digestion (followed by leachate purification and alkaline zinc electrolyses), chromate reduction (if necessary), solidification of leaching residue and its testing using the leaching analyses.
    Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part A 03/2007; 42(3):323-9. · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    Tahir Sofilić, Tihana Marjanović, Alenka Rastovcan-Mioc
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    ABSTRACT: The last twenty years have seen a number of cases of radioactive pollution in metallurgical industry. Therefore many metal producers have implemented systematic monitoring of radioactivity in their production processes, especially in steel processing, steel being the most applied construction material with the annual world output of over billion tonnes. Learning from the experience of the best known steel producers in Europe and the world Croatian steel mills have introduced radioactivity surveillance and control systems for radioactive elements in steel scrap, semi-finished and finished products. This paper argues in favour of radioactivity surveillance and control systems in steel and steel castings production in Croatia, and describes current systems and solutions available. Since we lack our own standards and regulations to control both domestic and imported steel scrap, semi-finished products (crude steel, hot and cold rolled strip) and finished products, we need to start implementing radioactivity surveillance and control systems in our steel and steel castings production applying the current international recommendations and guidelines, until we build up our own monitoring system and adopt legislation on the national level. This paper gives an overview of the basic types of radioactivity surveillance and control systems, the most frequent requirements to be met, as well as of the measurement and information flow in their application in steel and steel castings production.
    Archives of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology 04/2006; 57(1):45-54. · 0.67 Impact Factor
  • T. Sofilić, A. Rastovčan-Mioč, Z. Šmit
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    ABSTRACT: Metals and metallic products are fundamental to a large number of modern industries and steel is certainly one of the most significant metallurgical products. Steel and steel castings as universal production material, that provided the grounds for the contemporary industrialization process,will have a continuously irreplaceable role in the future, regardless of the fact that nowadays steel materials are often replaced by other materials (ceramics, polymers, etc.), whenever it is technically required and cost-justified.The development of metallurgy and metallurgical processes is accompanied by pollution of the environment that directly or indirectly endangered the health of humans, certain animal and plant species, water resources systems, and soil. It also lead to increased erosion of material goodsand caused many other adverse social and economy-related effects.The integral steelworks concept has, for example, set off a significant increase in the number of emission sources and the increase of harmful substances concentration in the environment. The largest polluters have always been coking plants, iron ore agglomeration facilities, blast furnaces, steel mills, foundries and thermal energy plants.Numerous fundamental scientific research works have proven a series of adverse effects caused by uncontrolled emissions of harmful substances from these plants. Beside the considerable quantities of usual and well-known polluting substances such as sulfur and carbon oxides, fluorides,ammonia, benzene, heavy metals, phenols, cyanides, oil and grease, slag, used refractory material, metallic scrapings, sludge, dust, and scale, there are also relatively small pollutions with long-lasting effects that are hazardous even in their low concentrations and they rarely receivedue attention.This polluting substance group consists of persistent organic pollutions represented by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins(PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). These compounds are the least explored of all known pollutions generated in the metallurgical processes, in terms of the impact of their emissions to the environment.The paper provides elementary toxicity data for these compounds and a survey of reference data on the currently completed listings of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans in the world and in Croatia, illustrating that the metallurgical process account for most of the total emission of these compounds into the environment.Based on the experience of the developed countries that are at the same time the largest iron and steel producers, we calculated an estimate of potential emissions of dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans from metallurgical processes in Croatia. The calculation took into account the coking processes, iron ore sintering processes, pig iron production, cast iron, openhearth steel and EAF steel production.The estimated total emission of dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans from metallurgical processes to the environment in the time period between 1990 and 2000 in Croatia was m = 3.987 g I-TEQ and annual emission in the same period ranged from Q<sub>I-TEQ</sub>= 1.284 g a<sup>-1</sup> in 1990 to Q<sub>I-TEQ</sub> = 0.153 g a<sup>-1</sup> in 1995.Emissions of these compounds from metallurgical processes that were active in less recent past were also calculated and the values in the time period between 1960 and 2000 ranged from m =2.888 g I-TEQ in 1980 to m = 0.153 g I-TEQ in 1995.Based on the data on the existing facilities for steel production in electric arc furnaces we estimated that annual emission of dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans could amount to Q<sub>I-TEQ</sub> ~ 0.260 g a<sup>-1</sup>, whereas the future emission of these compounds from the existing cast iron facilities could be Q<sub>I-TEQ</sub> ~ 0.100 g a<sup>-1</sup>.In the research follow-up for the impact of metallurgical processes on the overall emission of these compounds to the environment, it is required to measure their emissions from all active metallurgical processes. For the sake of better comprehension of emission flows of dibenzo-p-dioxins andpolychlorinated dibenzofurans from metallurgical processes it is necessary to determine the contents of these compounds in all kinds of waste generated in the observed metallurgical processes and to select technical solutions to improve each individual process and to reduce their emissions to the environment.
    Kemija u Industriji. 01/2006;
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    ABSTRACT: Within the scope of corporate waste management, Sisak Steelworks initiated a thorough and systematic examination of physical and chemical properties of metallurgical waste and of its behaviour in interaction with the environment. Electric arc furnace (EAF) dust has been categorized as hazardous technological waste and it can not be directly disposed of to the ground / in a land fill. Therefore, it is necessary to find a way to dispose of it in an environmentally friendly and economically acceptable manner. In order to elaborate different options and chose the optimal practice for the disposal of the accumulated volumes of hazardous metallurgical waste, comprehensive and systematic research has been conducted. This paper provides only a partial survey of the research of the heavy metal Zn, Pb, Cd content in electric arc furnace dust as well. Qualitative chemical analysis of samples of electric arc furnace dust was conducted on all observed samples and the presence of Fe, Zn, Pb, Mn, Cu, Al, Ca, Mg, K, S, P, C, O and Cl was established. The results of qualitative chemical analysis of monthly average samples of electric arc furnace dust obtained by other methods established that the mass fraction of iron was between 41.08 and 48.58 %, zinc between 3.75 and 8.10 %, lead between 0.94 and 2.07 %, and cadmium between 0.010 and 0.027 %. The results of the Zn, Pb, Cd fraction analysis in the observed samples of electric arc furnace dust are considerably lower, than the content of those metals in EAF dusts presented in the available references, where the mass fraction of zinc varies between 0.14 and 50 %, lead between 0.03 and 6.8 %, and cadmium between < 0.01 and 1.8 %. Quantitative analysis of Fe, Zn, Pb and Cd fraction was carried out in grain-metrical fractions of individual samples of EAF dust as well. The results have shown that the concentrations of Fe tend to increase with smaller fraction grains compared to an average sample, whereas concentrations of Zn, Pb and Cd in the same proportion display a descending tendency. Results of the Zn, Pb and Cd fraction analysis in the EAF dust samples from Sisak Steelworks compared to the mass fraction of those metals in EAF dust from other steel mills imply that the measured concentrations of zinc, lead, and cadmium are much higher. Therefore, it is not economically viable to recycle this dust for the lead, zinc or cadmium recovery. Consequently, the disposal of this kind of hazardous metallurgical waste must first be handled in another, environmentally acceptable and economically justifiable way. Additional investigations must be carried out before the final decision is made.
    Kemija u Industriji. 01/2005;
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    ABSTRACT: In order to make a complete characterization of electric-arc furnace (EAF) dust, as hazardous industrial waste, and to solve its permanent disposal and/or recovery, bearing in mind both the volumes formed in the Croatian steel industry and experiences of developed industrial countries, a study of its properties was undertaken. For this purpose, samples of EAF dust, taken from the regular production process in the Zeljezara Sisak Steel Mill between December 2000 and December 2001, were subjected to a series of tests. The chemical composition of EAF dust samples was investigated by means of a several different analytical methods. The results from the chemical analysis show that the approximate order of abundance of major elements in EAF dusts is as follows: Fe, Zn, Mn, Ca, Mg, Si, Pb, S, Cr, Cu, Al, C, Ni, Cd, As and Hg. Granular-metric composition of single samples was determined by applying sieve separation. Scanning electron micro-structural examination of EAF dust microstructure was performed and results indicated that all twelve EAF dusts were composed of solid spherical agglomerates with Fe, Zn, Pb, O, Si and Ca as the principal element. The investigation of grain morphology and the mineralogical composition of EAF dust were taken by combination of high resolution Auger electron spectroscopy (HR AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray powder diffraction analysis. The analysis of XPS-spectra determined the presence of zinc in the form of ZnO phase and the presence of lead in the form of PbO phase, i.e. PbSO3/PbSO4 forms. The results of the X-ray diffraction phase analysis show that the basis of the examined EAF dust samples is made of a mixture of metal oxides, silicates and sulphates. The metal concentration, anions, pH value and conductivity in water eluates was determined in order to define the influence of EAF dust on the environment.
    Journal of Hazardous Materials 07/2004; 109(1-3):59-70. · 3.93 Impact Factor
  • Tahir Sofilić, Tihana Marjanović, Alenka Rastovčan-Mioč
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    ABSTRACT: The last twenty years have seen a number of cases of radioactive pollution in metallurgical industry. Therefore many metal producers have implemented systematic monitoring of radioactivity in their production processes, especially in steel processing, steel being the most applied construction material with the annual world output of over billion tonnes. Learning from the experience of the best known steel producers in Europe and the world Croatian steel mills have introduced radioactivity surveillance and control systems for radioactive elements in steel scrap, semi-finished and finished products. This paper argues in favour of radioactivity surveillance and control systems in steel and steel castings production in Croatia, and describes current systems and solutions available. Since we lack our own standards and regulations to control both domestic and imported steel scrap, semi-finished products (crude steel, hot and cold rolled strip) and finished products, we need to start implementing radioactivity surveillance and control systems in our steel and steel castings production applying the current international recommendations and guidelines, until we build up our own monitoring system and adopt legislation on the national level. This paper gives an overview of the basic types of radioactivity surveillance and control systems, the most frequent requirements to be met, as well as of the measurement and information flow in their application in steel and steel castings production.
    Archives of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology (arhiv@imi.hr); Vol.57 No.1.