Renaud Le Goix

Université de Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

Are you Renaud Le Goix?

Claim your profile

Publications (18)2.21 Total impact

  • Source
    Renaud Le Goix, Elena Vesselinov
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Housing prices being one factor thought to contribute to segregation patterns, this paper aims at differentiating gated communities from non-gated communities in terms of change in property values. To what extent do gated communities contribute to price filtering of residents, accentuated by patterns of price differentiation favoring gated communities in the long run? The paper provides an analysis of the territorial nature of gated communities and how the private urban governance realm theoretically sustains the hypothesis of better protection of property values in gated communities. In order to identify price patterns across time, we elaborate a spatial analysis of values (Price Distance Index), identifying gated communities with real-estate listings in 2008, matched with historical data at the normalized census tract level from Census 1980, 1990 and 2000, in the greater Los Angeles region. We conclude that gated communities are very diverse in kind. The wealthier the area, the more they contribute to fuel price growth, especially in the most desired locations in the region. Furthermore, a dual behavior emerges in areas with an over-representation of gated communities. On the one hand, GCs participate in local contexts that introduce greater heterogeneity and instability in price patterns, and by doing so contribute to a local increase of price inequality that destabilizes the price patterns at neighborhood level. On the other hand, GCs spread in contexts that show a very strong stability, in terms of producing price homogeneity at the local level.
    International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 11/2013; · 1.54 Impact Factor
  • Elena Vesselinov, Renaud Le Goix
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Suburbanization has been a prominent urban process in the United States since the World War II. It has transformed American cities in profound ways in every single aspect of urban development; from population and wealth distributions, through political organization and affiliations, to the built environment. This paper investigates the link between gated communities and the process of suburbanization in the context of socio-economic inequality. It has been shown time and again in the scholarly literature on suburbanization, that suburban neighborhoods in American cities have been traditionally more affluent and less diverse than central cities. The research on gated communities in the US also shows that they are, on average, more affluent compared to other communities in terms of family income and housing values. Are gated communities then simply a new form of suburban communities? Is the gated community in fact a suburban community with the added element of security features? The paper investigates these questions based on segregation and spatial analyses. The research contributes to the long line of studies on suburbanization, gating and the larger issues of urban inequality. KeywordsSuburbanization–Gated communities–Segregation–Inequality
    GeoJournal 01/2012; 77(2):203-222.
  • Source
    Renaud Le Goix, Chris J. Webster
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article examines the notion of gated communities and, more generally, privately governed urban neighbourhoods. We do this by reviewing the idea that they are an innovative built-environment genre that has spread globally from a diverse set of roots and influences. These include the mass growth of private urban government in the USA over the past 30 years; rising income inequalities and fear in big cities; the French condominium law of 1804; and many other locally and culturally specific features of urban history. We contrast the popular notion that gated communities are simply an American export with the idea that they have emerged in various forms for different reasons in different places. We contrast supply-side and demand-side explanations, focusing on the idea that much of their appeal comes from the club-economy dynamics that underpin them. We examine the social and systemic costs – territorial outcomes – of cities made up of residential clubs, considering, in particular, the issue of segregation. We conclude with a reflection on the importance of local variations in the conditions that foster or inhibit the growth of a gated community market in particular countries.
    Geography Compass 06/2008; 2(4):1189 - 1214.
  • Source
    Renaud Le Goix
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The paper focuses on how gated communities, as private means of provision of public infrastructure and security, real estate products and club-economies, produce changes in housing market patterns. Based on an empirical study of Los Angeles (California) data, it aims to trace to which extent gates and walls favor property values and if the presence of gated communities produces over time (1980-2000) a deterrent effect on non-gated properties abutting the enclave, or close to it. Resulting of a demand for security, gated communities are a leading offer from the homebuilding industry. But their sprawl emerges from a partnership between local governments and land developers. Both agree to charge the homebuyer with the cost of urban sprawl (construction and maintenance costs of infrastructures within the gates). Such a structuring of residential space is then particularly desirable on the urban edges, where the cost of urban sprawl exceeds the financial assets of local public authorities. New private developments provide local governments with new wealthy taxpayers at almost no cost. As compensation, the homebuyer is granted with a private and exclusive access to sites and amenities (lakes, beaches, etc.). Such exclusivity favors the location rent, and usually positively affects the property value within the gated enclaves. But it is also assumed that operating cost of private governance are paid for by the increase of property values. Market failure nevertheless occurs when costs are raising above a sustainable level compared to property values. Changes produced by gates lead to at least two outcomes. At first sight, residential enclosures produce a price premium, thus being a smart investment. Furthermore, gated communities might well be able to generate enough property value to pay off the price of private governance. But the analysis stands on a short term basis. Larger and wealthier gated communities are successful in shielding their property values and generate enough revenue to pay for a cost of private governance, whereas a majority of average middle class gated enclaves do not succeed in creating a significant price premium, and / or did not maintain significant growth of price during the last decade. Such gated neighborhoods are at risk of a market failure in the private provision of urban infrastructure, leading to potential decay.
    01/2007;
  • Source
    Delphine Callen, Renaud Le Goix
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: L'article porte sur les enclaves fermées et les rues privées, dont on pense généralement qu'elles incarnent l'émergence d'un mode d'urbanisme dont la fermeture remettrait en cause la nature de l'espace urbain. Toutefois, ce phénomène est-il en France aussi nouveau qu'on le pense généralement ? Ne s'agit-il pas d'un phénomène enraciné dans les logiques qui ont fait et font la ville capitaliste (droits de propriété, rente foncière...) ? Et quelles en sont les conséquences en termes de sociabilité dans le voisinage, et dans les rapports à l'espace public ? On étudie ces processus de rétractation de l'espace public dans le cadre du développement des voies privées et des lotissements fermés dans le val de Bièvre (banlieue sud de Paris) très marqué par la multiplication de petits lotissements fermés côtoyant de vieux noyaux villageois rejoints par la périurbanisation. Bien qu'à vocation initialement privée, ces espaces résidentiels entretiennent d'étroites relations avec des espaces à vocation publique : voierie, parcs, espaces de loisirs, dont ils tirent l'essentiel de leur rente de site et de situation. Par l'étude de ces lotissements fermés, on cherche à évaluer si la séparation morphologique et juridique est la marque d'une volonté de séparation sociale. La fermeture est-elle fondée socialement, motivée par les choix résidentiels et les pratiques quotidiennes ? Ne sommes-nous pas plutôt en présence d'une forme de discours (des promoteurs immobiliers) mettant en avant une valeur ajoutée d'un produit immobilier ? Un première partie porte sur le contexte d'apparition des fermetures et des séparations en région parisienne, en dégageant la dimension historique et les logiques d'appropriation de l'espace de ces enclaves. Le dépouillement d'une enquête sur 75 résidents de ces quartiers préciseront ensuite les implications sociales de l'appartenance à des espaces résidentiels démarqués de l'espace public, ainsi que les modalités de leur insertion dans la ville, étudiées en termes d'usage des équipements publics de loisirs, de déplacements domicile-travail, et de stratégies résidentielles. Les résultats démontrent que - le déterminant de la fréquentation et des pratiques de l'espace public ont plus à voir avec le niveau d'étude, l'âge des résidents et leur niveau socio-professionnel qu'avec la nature du lotissement, ouvert ou fermé. - les éléments de différenciation ne sont pas tant à chercher au niveau du lotissement qu'au niveau de la commune. - l'appartenance communale détermine plus les critères de différenciation que les stratégies au niveau du lotissement.
    01/2006;
  • Source
    Chris Webster, Renaud Le Goix
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: So-called ‘gated’ communities have become common throughout the continents of Asia and America. Such communities are characterised by the ability to provide public goods and perform governance functions, independent of central and local government. It would be surprising if such communities did not develop to a greater extent in Britain, especially as a more complete legal framework now exists for their governance. Examples in Asia and America demonstrate their effectiveness, as do historical examples in the UK, such as the garden city movement. There are outstanding legal and regulatory issues that will need to be addressed as ‘gated’ communities do develop.
    Economic Affairs 11/2005; 25(4):19 - 23.
  • Source
    Renaud Le Goix
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gated communities, which are walled and gated residential neighbourhoods, represent a form of urbanism where public spaces are privatised. In the US, they represent a substantial part of the new housing market, especially in the recently urbanised areas. They have thus become a symbol of metropolitan fragmentation. This paper focuses on how local governments consider them as a valuable source of revenue because suburbanisation costs are paid by the private developers and the final homebuyer, and how this form of public-private partnership in the provision of urban infrastructure ultimately increases local segregation. An empirical study in the Los Angeles region aims to evaluate this impact on socio-economic and ethnic patterns using factorial analysis (dissimilarity indices). As a result, the sprawl of gated communities increases segregation. Very significant socio-economic dissimilarities are found to be associated with the enclosure, thus defining very homogeneous territories, especially on income and age criteria. However, gated communities are located in ethnic buffer zones and stress an exclusion that is structured at a municipal scale.
    Housing Studies 01/2005; · 0.66 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Renaud Le Goix
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Les gated communities, quartiers enclos et sécurisés interdits aux non-résidents représentent une part croissante des lotissements neufs. La fermeture physique et la sélection sociale qui président à ces produits immobiliers posent des problèmes inédits aux métropoles américaines : elles sont les manifestations de leur morcellement en villes privées, en quête d'une autonomie politique et fiscale préjudiciable à la métropole. L'article montre d'une part comment sont produites les logiques d'enclosure résidentielles dans le droit et dans la pratique. Dans un second temps, sur le terrain de Los Angeles, est étudié l'impact social de ces quartiers sur les municipalités et les voisinages d'appartenance. Il s'agit de mettre en évidence la construction des discontinuités associées à la fermeture. A partir d'une étude des disparités observées au niveau de l'enceinte de gated communities, on démontre l'effet de la fermeture sur les caractéristiques ethniques, sociales et sur l'âge des résidents, et sur la construction de territoires spécifiques.
    01/2005;
  • Source
    Renaud Le Goix, Delphine Callen
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper aims at demonstrating that gated communities, though often presented as a recent unsustainable trend of security-oriented urbanism, which have spread all over the world in the last two decades, are indeed a classical and generic form in urban sprawl and suburban landscape. In attempting this, we apply a theoretical approach that views the private residential community as a club economy to analyze the planning, managing practices an social interactions at the local level. We balance how private communities might be pro social sustainability tools or in contrast put urban equilibrium (political fragmentation, social interactions) at risk on the suburban edge of sprawling cities. We think that social sustainability issues connect to the genesis of urban edges' morphologies and requires analyzing the underlying forces that structure them. A first section analyses the long term trends in the local emergence of private residential governance, in order to get a better understanding of the diffusion of gated communities and how offer, demand and the local nexus of actors interact. Next, we consider how the local adoption of private urban governance models is structured by the nexus of laws, planning and residential strategies. More specifically, we analyze appropriation strategies of public space by private enclaves residents, and argue that local policies and discourses of intervening actors are often guided by locally driven interests and rent-seeking strategies that might contradict social equity principles. At last, we argue that local path dependency truly explains the success stories of gated communities according to local social and political patterns and local institutional milieus. Considering the nexus of law, but also the practices of development industries and layout of neighborhoods, the findings balance on one hand the strategies of local actors targeting the building of sustainable communities from the owners and entrepreneurs point of view, and on the other hands the equity principles at a more general level. This demonstrates that common goals of private communities is about getting control over nearby environment (control over public space, amenities, etc.) and guarantee property values. Nevertheless, field studies and residents interviews, empirical data describing political behaviors of GCs and social relations of the residents reveal path dependencies in the local manifestations of private communities. Whatever the legal context, local actors, residents strategies, public bodies of governments and entrepreneurs find ways to meet a continuous demand of local control. This can be met either by the means of private urban governance, or by a local body of public government, depending on how local institutional milieus have structured decision making, fiscal regulation and social exclusion patterns. This concurs to demonstrate that private residential areas political behaviors and social interactions are eventually familiar and consistent with more casual patterns in a suburban world.
    Gated Communities: Social sustainability in contemporary and historical gated developments.
  • Source
    Elena Vesselinov, Renaud Le Goix
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper we use geographically referenced data for two metropolitan areas in the U.S. to test hypotheses about the homogeneity of gated communities and their link to segregation. Based on methodology developed by Renaud Le Goix in his study of Los Angeles area, we investigate homogeneity in three aspects: race/ethnicity, economic class and age. The results indicate that gated communities are mostly homogeneous enclaves. Their relevance to segregation patterns is structured through buffer zones: stronger social discontinuities cannot be found matching gated communities boundaries, but at a certain distance from the walls. Overall, gated communities lead to increased segregation by reinforcing the already existing levels of racial residential segregation in each metropolitan area.
  • Source
    Renaud Le Goix
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: La question porte sur la genèse des espaces résidentiels de front d'urbanisation, et les forces qui les structurent : si les acteurs privés y contribuent largement à la production de l'espace (investisseurs, promoteurs immobiliers nationaux et grands promoteurs internationaux...), les collectivités locales jouent pourtant un rôle clé, pratiquant par exemple une restriction de l'offre foncière, la sélection sociale des résidants, les politiques de densification ou les tentations de l'éparpillement du front urbain. L'article propose un cadre d'analyse expérimental portant sur l'imbrication des effets de contexte dans la production des espaces résidentiels périurbains. A partir d'analyse exploratoires menées sur une typologie de lotissements résidentiels en Ile-de-France, il s'agira de développer quelques aspects méthodologiques permettant d'analyser conjointement deux niveaux de contextes dans la production des lotissements périurbains. - d'une part les contextes socio-économiques et fonciers, notamment dans leur liens avec les choix morphologiques et fonctionnels des lotissements produits. - d'autre part les contextes institutionnels, afin d'apprécier les niveaux d'imbrication des décisions, actions et aménagements pris en charge par les différents partenaires du développement périurbain (acteurs publics, acteurs privés, syndicats d'agglomération nouvelle, investisseur foncier privé, lotisseur, etc.). Dans un premier temps, on décrit les types de morphologies produites par les lotissements enclavés en Ile-de-France à partir d'une base de données fournie par l'IAU-IdF, puis dans quelle mesure et à quelles échelles ces types morphologiques se combinent avec les caractéristiques socio-économiques appréhendées au niveau municipal (revenus par déciles). On discute enfin des échelles pertinentes pour analyser la nature institutionnelle et de la production des enclaves résidentielles périurbaines.
    Les premières Journées du Pôle Ville - Ville, Transport et Territoire, Quoi de neuf ? - 20 au 22 janvier 2010.
  • Source
    Renaud Le Goix
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Les ensembles résidentiels fermés, privés ou enclavés ont acquis une certaine importance, peut-être plus dans le débat public et scientifique que dans les faits. En première analyse, l'enquête menée par l'IAU îdF, conjointement aux travaux du programme financé par l'Agence nationale de la recherche («Interactions public-privé dans la production du périurbain»), montre en Île-de-France le petit nombre d'ensembles résidentiels fermés [LOUDIER-MALGOUYRES, 2010]. On note, d'une part, la petite taille de ces ensembles, et d'autre part, leur surreprésentation dans les communes de petite couronne, dans le cadre d'un renouvellement ou d'une densification du tissu urbain. Cette situation est pourtant à lire au regard des évolutions observées dans d'autres contextes : en Californie du Sud, qui fait figure de laboratoire de la gouvernance urbaine privée résidentielle depuis les années 1960 avec de nombreux et grands lotissements privés, mais aussi au Royaume-Uni, où ces formes – plus modestes de par leur taille – se sont développées récemment. Ces différences d'évolution s'expliquent en partie par des effets de contextes attachés aux législations et aux politiques de développement urbain de chaque pays.
    Les Cahiers de l'Institut d'Aménagement et d'Urbanisme de la région Ile-de-France.
  • Source
    Renaud Le Goix
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper aims at providing a methodological framework that comprehends the different levels of intricate interactions in the prodution of suburban residential patterns. By doing so, I wish to introduce an analysis of the local contexts of production of suburban PUG. This will be eventually achieved by the means of quantitative analysis (multilevel spatial analysis of income patterns and morphological typologies of subdivisions) and qualitative data. In this aim, identifying recent enclaved subdivisions will be used as a proxy to study a representative sample of subdivisions in the suburban areas of Paris metropolitan region. A database of 909 enclaved subdivision provided by the Greater Paris Region Planning Agency (from now on IAU-IdF1) will be used to identify street patterns, local morphologies, nearby land uses. This requires focusing on three main issues that underlies the theoretical and methodological choices the paper will discuss and justify : first, an analysis of PUD morphological fragmentation ; second, a comparative study of socio-spatial fragmentation (based upon income data) and regulation practices, interactions between actors and suburban sprawl ; and at last, an effort towards a better understanding of the retraction of public space, resulting from planning and development choices. Indeed, we push the argument that analyzing public and private partnerships in the production of suburban residential spaces, requires to investigate several dimensions : theoretical issues of institutional regulations, interactions between individual strategies at a local scale, these of private operators and developers as well as these of the residents. At last, the paper aims at demonstrating how these numerous and divergent dimensions may be jointly analyzed by the means of quantitative and qualitative multi-level analysis that indetifiy production contexts and territorial outcomes.
    5th International Conference of the Research Network Private Urban Governance & Gated Communities (Redefinition of Public Space Within the Privatization of Cities).
  • Source
    Renaud Le Goix, Céline Loudier-Malgouyres
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: La production et la gestion des espaces et services urbains dans le développement métropolitain passent progressivement dans le cadre de partenariats public-privé (PPP). Dans quelle mesure ces partenariats contribuent-ils à la construction de l’intérêt général, et ne s’agit-il pas de pratiques masquant le désinvestissement des collectivités locales ? Dans quelles mesures les PPP participent à l’élaboration d’espaces urbains d’un caractère nouveau ? Ces questions portent sur la genèse des espaces urbains produits dans ce cadre et repose sur trois hypothèses: d’une part, les acteurs privés apportent une contribution importante dans la production de l'espace urbain (aménageurs, promoteurs, gestionnaires) ; d’autre part, les collectivités locales jouent un rôle clé (interventions sur l'offre foncière, définition de l’occupation du sol, délégation contractuelle, exclusivisme sociale) ; et les espaces de droit public tendent à disparaître, au profit d’un urbanisme privé (lotissements, centres commerciaux, espaces publics-privés dans les downtowns). Cet article propose une analyse de la production de l’espace urbain dans le cadre des partenariats public-privé centrée sur deux objets bien connus, l’un au centre — la rénovation du Central Business District —; l’autre, les gated communities, plus courant sur le front d’urbanisation. L’exemple du développement métropolitain par les gated communities montre comment on est passé d’une logique de développement urbain du ressort de la responsabilité publique (avec planification de la production et des services à rendre) à une production d’espaces urbains juxtaposés se concrétisant par la jouissance exclusive et privative du lieu, mais faisant sens dans leur montage financier pour les collectivités locales comme pour les promoteurs. Le comté, la municipalité, sans moyen, mettent en place et autorisent des partenariats avec le secteur privé qui au final génèrent des poches résidentielles aux services et aux équipements presque réservés. Le problème n’est d’ailleurs pas tant la question foncière et fonctionnelle (enclave résidentielle, commerciale...) de ces modes de production urbaine que dans la façon dont les services et équipements urbains deviennent des objets privés et exclusifs qui remettent en cause l’idée que la ville comme lieu commun. Les objectifs et la logique dévient d’une production de « bien public » pour la population (le développement urbain en général) à la négociation financière entre le secteur privé et l’acteur public pour la construction d’espaces collectifs qui se disent publics. De même, la production et la gestion des espaces publics urbains dans le cadre de l’Incentive zoning et des BIDs rendent service aux municipalités en proie aux difficultés budgétaires. Mais, dans une position vulnérable, la collectivité publique peine à faire entendre ses ambitions (si tant est qu’elle en ait) et l’on voit dans la réalité que les espaces créés comme leur mode de gestion servent en définitive moins les objectifs des municipalités que ceux des acteurs privés engagés, résumés dans la mise en œuvre et la valorisation de leurs activités. Les PPP, pour réussir à produire ce « bien public », et accorder intérêt général et intérêts particuliers, doivent pouvoir donner les moyens d’une négociation équitable, ou en tout cas jugée équitable par les deux parties, et fixer clairement leurs objectifs en terme de production d’espaces urbain.
  • Source
    Renaud Le Goix, Chris Webster
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper explores the political, financial and environmental sustainability of private communities. Using a theoretical approach that views the private residential community as a club economy, we analyze the planning and managing practices of 219 gated residential communities in the Los Angeles area. This investigation demonstrates that private urban governance is a locally sustainable solution that might help stabilize the financing of urban growth, redevelop aging neighborhoods, maintain social diversity, conserve non-renewable urban resources, and encourage reinvestment in urban infrastructure. However, these gains are not made without social costs and spillovers. Breaking down municipal management into smaller units might deliver a more economically sustainable urban system on the whole, but only at the expense of marginalizing those excluded from the club economy. In addition, private urban governance is still dependent on state subsidy. This new urban dynamic will become more important as private associations attempt to increase the public subsidy of their activities and municipal governments look for ways to reduce their liabilities through private sector providers.
  • Source
    Renaud Le Goix
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cet article propose une analyse systémique de gated communities comme des formes génériques de la croissance urbaine, à travers les stratégies d'acteurs, des promoteurs et des résidants impliqués dans leur développement. Chacun de ces acteurs opère des choix, met en œuvre des politiques publiques qui orientent les stratégies de localisation : ceci contribue à structurer le développement des enclaves résidentielles fermées dans les villes capitalistes depuis au moins 150 ans. Une telle comparaison des dynamiques à long terme et à court terme de l'émergence de ces enclaves doit contribuer à structurer le débat sur la signification des gated communities dans les espaces urbains et dans les pratiques d'aménagement. On relie les linéaments historiques de la genèse des gated communities aux formes classiques de production des quartiers résidentiels et de leurs paysages, qui impliquent la mise en œuvre des logiques d'exclusivité, de lotissements pavillonnaires, de gestion privée en copropriété. Il apparaît que les gated communities émergent également d'une logique sécuritaire plus récente, qui en ont fait une offre importante de la part des promoteurs immobiliers. Néanmoins, leur diffusion émerge plutôt d'un partenariat poussé entre les autorités locales et les lotisseurs, en accord pour faire porter les coûts d'infrastructure liés à l'étalement urbain sur l'acquéreur d'un bien immobilier. Une telle structuration de l'espace résidentiel est alors particulièrement intéressante sur les fronts d'urbanisation où les coûts de l'étalement excèdent largement les capacités financières des autorités publiques locales. Les nouvelles résidences privées offrent à ces autorités de nouveaux contribuables locaux, sans qu'elles aient à en supporter le coût. Comme compensation de cet investissement financier, l'acquéreur obtient l'exclusivité de l'accès au site, à ses équipements et à ses aménités (plages, lacs...). Une telle exclusivité agit en faveur de la valeur des propriétés situées au sein des gated communities. Finalement, leur relative nouveauté réside dans leur statut récent d'un phénomène global qui se traduit par une production accrue d'inégalités dans la ville : elles favorisent leurs résidants par les biais d'une grande homogénéité sociale et par des services privés ; mais ces aspects agissent souvent au détriment des quartiers situés dans leur voisinage.
  • Source
    Anne-Lise Humain-Lamoure, Renaud Le Goix
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cette contribution vise à identifier, dans le contexte de la métropolisation, quelques problématiques sur la ville à approfondir dans l’enseignement, et par là même dans la recherche, selon trois axes : comment rendre compte de la complexité des phénomènes liés à la métropolisation ? comment expliciter une division sociale de l’espace souvent rattachées à la métropolisation par des causalités directes (dualisation sociale, comme le propose S. Sassen) ? comment enfin mettre en évidence la complexité des jeux d’acteurs ?
  • Source
    Renaud Le Goix
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Afin de cerner la portée de l'urbaphobie dans les métropoles états-uniennes, on s'attache à étudier la forme résidentielle qui incarne probablement le mieux les discours anti-urbains dans les paysages urbains contemporains : les enclaves résidentielles privées et fermées. Cet article vise à proposer une analyse des composantes du discours porté par un produit immobilier devenu un symbole global d'un idéal anti-urbain, les gated communities. Dans ce cadre, la démarche proposée ici comporte deux questions. Dans quelle mesure le produit immobilier gated communities relève d'une promotion d'un modèle d'urbanisme qui revêt des valeurs ou des discours anti-urbains ? En quoi ces quartiers fermés et sécurisés sont-ils originaux tant du point de vue morphologique que de leur projet social, et différent-ils des autres développements résidentiels, pour que se justifie une telle focalisation à leur propos des interrogations sur la fragmentation urbaine ? Ce faisant, quelle est la portée du discours de la promotion immobilière, reposant sur un marketing de la crise urbain, sur les territorialités construites par l'enferment résidentiel ? Avatar parmi d'autres d'un discours anti-urbain classique qui traverse dans le temps long la ville américaine, les gated communities apparaissent comme un produit avant tout périurbain, loin de la ville, qui tend à s'enraciner dans les origines toponymiques locales, qui met en valeur son site — en toute exclusivité —, son cadre de vie. On retiendra des structures spatiales, des associations entre composantes du discours et structures socio-économique de l'espace, en se gardant d'en déduire des relations de cause à effet. On a relevé les associations entre le discours valorisant la rente de site et les catégories les plus privilégiées ; le discours mettant en avant les loisirs semblent plutôt viser les classes moyennes âgées, par le biais des communautés de retraités ; le discours plus neutres d'une toponymie reprenant les noms des rues visant plutôt les classes moyennes issues de l'immigration récente, dans des quartiers plus centraux, donc moins sensibles aux discours anti-urbains. Au final, le produit gated communities s'inscrit dans l'espace social comme un produit immobilier parmi d'autres : dans les discours, la fermeture relève plus du symbole et de la stratégie immobilière que du séparatisme social souvent supposé.