J. Dijkstra

Wageningen University, Wageningen, Gelderland, Netherlands

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Publications (384)305.98 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) in the bovine mammary gland introduces a cis-double bond at the Δ9 position in a wide range of fatty acids (FA). Several long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) inhibit expression of SCD, but information on the effect of short-chain fatty acids on mammary SCD expression is scarce. We used a bovine mammary cell line (MAC-T) to assess the effect of acetic acid (Ac) and β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA) in comparison with the effect of various long-chain fatty acids on the mRNA expression of the lipogenic enzymes SCD, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACACA), fatty acid synthase (FASN) and their associated gene regulatory proteins sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (SREBF1), insulin-induced gene 1 protein (INSIG1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARA)and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARD) by quantitative real-time PCR. MAC-T cells were treated for 12 h without FA additions (CON) or with either 5 mM Ac, 5 mM BHBA, a combination of 5 mM Ac + 5 mM BHBA, 100 μM C16:0, 100 μM C18:0, 100 μM C18:1 cis-9, 100 μM C18:1 trans-11, 100 μM C18:2 cis-9,12 or 100 μM C18:3 cis-9,12,15. Compared with control, mRNA expression of SCD1 was increased by Ac (+61%) and reduced by C18:1 cis-9 (-61%), C18:2 cis-9,12 (-84%) and C18:3 cis-9,12,15 (-88%). In contrast to native bovine mammary gland tissue, MAC-T cells did not express SCD5. Expression of ACACA was increased by Ac (+44%) and reduced by C18:2 cis-9,12 (-48%) and C18:3 cis-9,12,15 (-49%). Compared with control, FASN expression was not significantly affected by the treatments. The mRNA level of SREBF1 was not affected by Ac or BHBA, but was reduced by C18:1 cis-9 (-44%), C18:1 trans-11 (-42%), C18:2 cis-9,12 (-62%) and C18:3 cis-9,12,15 (-68%) compared with control. Expression of INSIG1 was downregulated by C18:0 (-37%), C18:1 cis-9 (-63%), C18:1 trans-11 (-53%), C18:2 cis-9,12 (-81%) and C18:3 cis-9,12,15 (-91%). Both PPARA and PPARD expression were not significantly affected by the treatments. Our results show that Ac upregulated mRNA expression of SCD1 and ACACA in MAC-T cells. The opposite effect of the PUFA C18:2 cis-9,12 and C18:3 cis-9,12,15 on the these genes and the failure of Ac to mimic the PUFA-inhibited SREBF1 and INSIG1 mRNA expression, suggest that Ac can stimulate mammary lipogenesis via a transcriptional regulatory mechanism different from PUFA.
    animal 04/2013; · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A meta-analysis investigation based on literature data was conducted to estimate the effect size of nutritional and animal factors on phosphorus (P) excretion in feces and concentrations of P in milk. Two data sets were created for statistical analysis: One to derive prediction equations for P in feces (25 studies; 130 treatments) and another for P in milk (19 studies; 94 treatments). Prediction equations were derived using mixed model regression analysis with a random effect for study, and equations were evaluated based on values for Bayesian information criterion (BIC), root mean square prediction error (RMSPE), and concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) statistics. In terms of RMSPE and CCC values, fecal P excretion was best predicted by P intake, where P in feces (g/d) = -3.8(±3.45) + 0.64(±0.038) × P intake (g/d) (RMSPE: 18.3%, CCC: 0.869). However, significant effects of crude protein [g/kg of dry matter (DM)], neutral detergent fiber (g/kg of DM), and milk yield (kg/d) on fecal P excretion were also found. Despite a lack of improvement in terms of RMSPE and CCC values, these parameters may still explain part of the variation in fecal P excretion. For milk P, expressed as a fraction of P intake, the following equation had the highest CCC and the lowest RMSPE value: P in milk as a fraction of P intake (g/g) = 0.42(±0.065) + 0.23(±0.018) × feed efficiency (i.e., fat- and protein-corrected milk yield/dry matter intake) - 0.11(±0.0199) × P in feed (g/kg of DM) (RMSPE: 19.7%; CCC: 0.761). Equations derived to predict fecal P as a fraction of P intake (g/g) or milk P content (g/kg) could not adequately explain the observed variation and did not perform well in terms of RMSPE and CCC values. Examination of the residuals showed that P balance was a seemingly confounding factor in some of the models. The results presented here can be used to estimate P in feces and milk based on commonly measured dietary and milk variables, but could also be used to guide development of mechanistic models on P metabolism in lactating dairy cattle. Factors to consider in future research and modeling efforts regarding efficiency of P use include the effects of dietary neutral detergent fiber, crude protein, starch, variation in P content of milk, and effects of P resorption from bone and body tissues during early lactation.
    Journal of Dairy Science 04/2013; · 2.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A modified rinsing method for the in situ technique was developed to separate, isolate and characterise the soluble (S), the insoluble washout (W-S) and the non-washout fractions (D + U) within one procedure. For non-incubated bags (t = 0 h), this method was compared with the conventional, Combined Fractionation (CF) method that measures the D + U and S fractions in separate steps and subsequently calculates the W-S fraction. The modified method was based on rinsing of nylon bags in a closed vessel containing a buffer solution (pH 6.2) during 1 h, where shaking speeds of 40, 100, and 160 strokes per minutes (spm) were evaluated, and tested for six feed ingredients (faba beans, maize, oats, peas, soya beans and wheat) and four forages (two ryegrass silages and two maize silages). The average recoveries as the sum of all fractions were 0.972 ± 0.041 for N and 0.990 ± 0.050 for starch (mean ± s.d.). The mean W-S fraction increased with increasing shaking speed and varied between 0.017 (N) and 0.083 (starch) at 40 spm and 0.078 (N) and 0.303 (starch) at 160 spm, respectively. For ryegrass silages, the W-S fraction was absent at all shaking speeds, but was present in the CF method. The modified method, in particular at 40 and 100 spm, reduced the loss of small particles during rinsing, resulting in lower W-S and higher D + U fractions for N and starch compared with the CF method. For soya beans and ryegrass silage, the modified method reduced the S fraction of N compared with the CF method. The results obtained at 160 spm showed the best comparison with those from the CF method. The W-S fraction of the feedstuff obtained at 160 spm contained mainly particles smaller than 40 μm (0.908 ± 0.086). In most feedstuff, starch was the most abundant chemical component in the W-S fraction and its content (726 ± 75 g/kg DM) was higher than in the D + U fraction (405 ± 177 g/kg DM). Alkaline-soluble proteins were the dominant N-containing components in the W-S fraction of dry feed ingredients and its relative content (0.79 ± 0.18 of total N in W-S) was higher than in the D + U fraction (0.59 ± 0.07 of total N in D + U) for all feedstuff except maize. The molecular weight distribution of the alkaline-soluble proteins differed between the W-S and the D + U fractions of all dry feed ingredients, except soya beans and wheat.
    animal 03/2013; · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Milk urea nitrogen (MUN) concentration in dairy cows may serve as an on-farm indicator to guide nutritional strategies and to help reduce emissions of nitrogen (N) to the environment. Excretion of urinary urea nitrogen (UUN) is positively related to MUN, but the relationship is highly variable. The accuracy of MUN as a predictor of UUN may improve when various factors that affect this relationship can be taken into account. The current review discusses the impact of a number of UUN : MUN ratio influencing factors related to: physiological mechanisms in the dairy cow, farm management, differences between individual cows, nutrition and analysis methods for MUN. Factors related to variation in water intake, urine production, dietary protein level, body weight (BW) and time and frequency of feeding and milking are shown to affect MUN and its relationship with UUN. In addition, a number of factors are discussed that are likely to affect this relationship such as biological rhythm, renal reabsorption of urea during periods of protein deficiency and breeding value for MUN. Accounting for these above-mentioned factors in the relationship between MUN and UUN might substantially improve the applicability and accuracy of MUN as a predictor of protein utilization efficiency and UUN.
    The Journal of Agricultural Science 01/2013; 151(03):407-423. · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ruminant production contributes to emissions of nitrogen (N) to the environment, principally ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O) and di-nitrogen (N2) to air, nitrate (NO3 −) to groundwater and particulate N to surface waters. Variation in dietary N intake will particularly affect excretion of urinary N, which is much more vulnerable to losses than is faecal N. Our objective is to review dietary effects on the level and form of N excreted in cattle urine, as well as its consequences for emissions of N2O. The quantity of N excreted in urine varies widely. Urinary N excretion, in particular that of urea N, is decreased upon reduction of dietary N intake or an increase in the supply of energy to the rumen microorganisms and to the host animal itself. Most of the N in urine (from 50% to well over 90%) is present in the form of urea. Other nitrogenous components include purine derivatives (PD), hippuric acid, creatine and creatinine. Excretion of PD is related to rumen microbial protein synthesis, and that of hippuric acid to dietary concentration of degradable phenolic acids. The N concentration of cattle urine ranges from 3 to 20 g/l. High-dietary mineral levels increase urine volume and lead to reduced urinary N concentration as well as reduced urea concentration in plasma and milk. In lactating dairy cattle, variation in urine volume affects the relationship between milk urea and urinary N excretion, which hampers the use of milk urea as an accurate indicator of urinary N excretion. Following its deposition in pastures or in animal houses, ubiquitous microorganisms in soil and waters transform urinary N components into ammonium (NH4 +), and thereafter into NO3 − and ultimately in N2 accompanied with the release of N2O. Urinary hippuric acid, creatine and creatinine decompose more slowly than urea. Hippuric acid may act as a natural inhibitor of N2O emissions, but inhibition conditions have not been defined properly yet. Environmental and soil conditions at the site of urine deposition or manure application strongly influence N2O release. Major dietary strategies to mitigating N2O emission from cattle operations include reducing dietary N content or increasing energy content, and increasing dietary mineral content to increase urine volume. For further reduction of N2O emission, an integrated animal nutrition and excreta management approach is required.
    animal 01/2013; 7 Suppl 2:292-302. · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The dairy sector contributes to climate change through emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs), via mainly carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). Replacing grass silage with maize silage is a feeding strategy to reduce enteric CH4 emission. The effect of this strategy on GHG emissions can be analyzed at three different levels: animal, farm, and chain level. The level of analysis might affect results and conclusions, because the strategy affects not only enteric CH4 emissions at animal level, but also other GHG emissions at farm and chain levels. The objective of this study was to determine if the level of analysis influences conclusions about the GHG reduction potential of increasing maize silage at the expense of grass and grass silage in a dairy cow’s diet. First, we used a linear programming (LP, maximizing labor income) dairy farm model to define a typical Dutch dairy farm on sandy soils without a predefined feeding strategy (i.e. reference situation). Second, we combined mechanistic modeling of enteric fermentation and life cycle assessment to quantify GHG emissions at all three levels. Third, continuing from the diet derived in the reference situation, maize silage was increased by 1 kg DM per cow per day at the expense of grass (summer), or grass silage (winter). Next, the dairy farm model was used again to determine a new optimal farm plan including the feeding strategy, and GHGs were quantified again at the three levels. Finally, we compared GHG emissions at the different levels between the reference situation and the situation including the feeding strategy. We performed this analysis for a farm with an average intensity (13,430 kg milk/ha) and for a more intensive farm (14,788 kg milk/ha). Results show that the level of analysis strongly influences results and conclusions. At animal level, the strategy reduced annual emissions by 12.8 kg CO2e per ton of fat-and-protein-corrected-milk (FPCM). Analysis at farm and chain level revealed first of all that the strategy is not feasible on the farm with an average intensity because this farm cannot reduce its grassland area because of compliance with the EU derogation regulation (a minimum of 70% grassland). This is reality for many Dutch dairy farms with an intensity up to the average. For the more intensive farm, that can reduce its area of grassland, annual emissions reduced by 17.8 kg CO2e per ton FPCM at farm level, and 20.9 kg CO2e per ton FPCM at chain level. Ploughing grassland into maize land, however, resulted in non-recurrent emissions of 913 kg CO2e per ton FPCM. At farm and chain levels, therefore, the strategy does not immediately reduce GHG emissions as opposed to what results at animal level may suggest; at chain level it takes 44 years before annual emission reduction has paid off emissions from land use change.
    Agricultural Systems 01/2013; 121:9–22. · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the current study was to explore the use of the tracer 13C as an internal marker to assess feed fraction-specific digesta passage kinetics through the digestive tract of dairy cows. Knowledge on feed-specific fractional passage rates is essential to improve estimations on the extent of rumen degradation and microbial protein efficiency; however, this information is largely lacking. An in vivo and in vitro experiment was conducted with grass silages (Lolium perenne L.) that were enriched with 13C by growing the grass under elevated 13CO2 conditions. In a crossover design, two dairy cows received pulse doses of two 13C-enriched grass silages and chromium-mordanted neutral detergent fibre (Cr-NDF) into the rumen. The two 13C-enriched grass silages used differed in digestibility and were grown under identical field conditions as the bulk silages fed to the animals. Faecal excretion patterns of 13C-enriched dry matter (13C-DM), neutral detergent fibre (13C-NDF) and Cr-NDF were established, and a nonlinear multicompartmental model was used to determine their rumen passage kinetics. In addition, the 13C-enriched silages were incubated in rumen liquid in an in vitro batch culture system at different time intervals to determine the effect of fermentation on 13C-enrichment in the residue. The in vitro study showed that the 13C : 12C ratios in DM and NDF residues remained stable from 24 h of incubation onwards. In addition, in vitro fractional degradation rates for 12C in the DM and NDF did not differ from those of 13C, indicating that fermentative degradation does not affect the 13C : 12C ratio in the DM nor in the NDF fraction of the residue. Model fits to the faecal excretion curves showed a significant difference in fractional rumen passage rates between Cr-NDF, 13C-DM and 13C-NDF (P ⩽ 0.025). Silage type had no clear effect on rumen passage kinetics (P ⩾ 0.081). Moreover, it showed that peak enrichments for 13C-DM and 13C-NDF in faeces were reached at 30.7 and 41.7 h post dosing, respectively. This is well after the time (24 h) when the 13C : 12C ratios of the in vitro unfermented residues have reached stable enrichment level. Fractional rate constants for particle passage from the rumen are estimated from the descending slope of faecal excretion curves. The present study shows that the decline in 13C : 12C ratio after peak enrichment is not affected by fermentative degradation and therefore can be used to assess feed component-specific fractional passage rates.
    animal 12/2012; · 1.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The concentration of urea in milk (MUC) has emerged as a potentially useful tool to predict urinary N excretion. Various factors may affect the relationship between MUC and urinary N excretion, including transport characteristics of urea from blood to milk and vice versa. The main objective of this study was to test whether substantial transport of urea from milk to blood exists in lactating dairy cattle. The subobjectives were (1) to assess the effects of various urea gradient levels between blood and milk on urea transport from milk to blood and (2) to test the occurrence of urea transport between different compartments of the mammary gland such as the cistern and the alveoli. Urea transport was studied in 2 multiparous lactating Holstein-Friesian cows (36.0 ± 6.18 kg of milk/d; mean ± SD). In 3 separate trials, boluses of [15N15N]urea were injected in the cisterns via the teat canals at 20, 60, and 120 min before the 1700-h milking at various levels of MUC and of blood plasma urea concentration (PUC). In trial 1, a primed continuous infusion of urea (105 g at the start, continuing with 20 g/h) into the jugular vein started at 0500 h and stopped at 0, 1, 2, and 3 h before the 1700-h milking on d 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. In trial 2, 5.5 g of urea was injected into the cisterns at 20, 60, and 120 min before the 1700-h milking on d 5, 6, and 7, respectively. In trial 3, urea fluxes were measured without an experimentally induced gradient between MUC and PUC on d 8, 9, and 10, respectively. During milking, successive milk samples were taken from first to last milk. Blood and milk were analyzed for 15N-urea enrichment. Levels of 15N-urea in blood increased after injection of a [15N15N]urea bolus in milk, indicating urea transport from milk to blood. Between 21.0 and 35.3% of injected [15N15N]urea in milk was recovered after 2 h. The fractional [15N15N]urea decline rate in milk varied between 0.0076 and 0.0096/min. The level of MUC, rather than the concentration gradient between MUC and PUC, appeared to affect this fractional rate of decline. Enrichment levels of 15N-urea in milk samples within a single milking showed that urea was transported from cistern milk to alveoli milk. In conclusion, the results indicate that transport of urea from milk to blood in lactating dairy cattle occurs and that urea is transported from cistern milk to alveoli milk.
    Journal of Dairy Science 11/2012; 95(11):6536–6541. · 2.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Milk urea nitrogen (MUN; mg of N/dL) has been shown to be related to excretion of urinary urea N (UUN; g of N/d) and total excretion of urinary N (UN; g of N/d) in dairy cows. In the present experiment, it was hypothesized that MUN and the relationship between MUN and UUN or UN is affected by urine volume as a result of dietary sodium chloride intake. Twelve lactating Holstein-Friesian dairy cows (mean ± SD: milk production 28.1 ± 3.23 kg/d and 190 ± 41 d in milk), of which 4 were fitted with catheters in the urine bladder and jugular vein, were randomly assigned to 4 dietary levels of sodium chloride (3, 9, 14, and 19 g of Na/kg of DM) according to a triple 4 × 4 Latin square design. Cows were fed at 95% of ad libitum intake, excluding salt addition. Milk was analyzed for MUN and protein content; urine was analyzed for total N, urea, and creatinine content; feces were analyzed for total N and DM content; and blood plasma was analyzed for urea and creatinine content. Creatinine clearance rate (CCR; L/min) and renal urea reabsorption ratio were estimated based on plasma concentrations of urea and creatinine, and total excretion of urea and creatinine in urine. Intake of DM and N, milk production, and milk protein content were (mean ± SD), on average, 21.4 ± 1.24 kg/d, 522 ± 32.0 g/d, 25.4 ± 2.53 kg/d, and 3.64 ± 0.186%, respectively. A linear relationship was found between Na intake and urine production [urine (kg/d; mean ± SE) = 7.5 ± 4.33 + 0.136 ± 0.0143 × Na intake (g/d)] and between Na intake and MUN [MUN (mg/dL; mean ± SE) = 13.5 ± 0.35 - 0.0068 ± 0.00104 × Na intake (g/d)]. Despite the decrease in MUN with increased Na intake, UN excretion increased linearly with Na intake. Excretion of UUN was not affected by dietary Na content. A linear plateau relationship was observed between CCR and renal urea reabsorption. An increase in CCR coincided with an increase in calculated renal urea reabsorption until a CCR breakpoint value (mean ± SD) of 1.56 ± 0.063 L/min was reached. We conclude that Na intake is negatively related to MUN, whereas UUN is not affected. Variation in mineral intake levels that affect urine volume should, therefore, be taken into account when using MUN as an indicator of UUN in dairy cattle.
    Journal of Dairy Science 10/2012; · 2.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A meta-analysis was conducted to study milk fatty acid (FA) profile in dairy cows in response to changes in dietary nutrient composition in relation to supplementation of fat sources, their technological form, addition of fish oil and main forage type in the basal diet. Data comprised 151 treatment means from 50 experiments, which were included in the database when diet composition, nutrient composition, FA composition, dry matter (DM) intake, milk yield, milk composition and milk FA profile were reported. Mixed model regression analysis including a random experiment effect and unequal variances among experiments was used. Least squares means were obtained for the different fat sources (unsupplemented, rapeseed, soybean+sunflower, linseed, or fish oil), technological form including addition of fish oil (oil, seed, protected and added fish oil), and main forage type (lucerne silage, barley silage, maize silage, grass silage, maize silage combined with haylage, or haylage) in the basal diet. Results showed that the technological form of supplemental rapeseed, soybean, sunflower, or linseed significantly influenced the effect of dietary nutrient composition on milk fat content and milk FA profile resulting in significant differences between technological forms within the different fat sources. Protected rapeseed and linseed increased C18:2n6 and C18:3n3 proportions in milk fat, respectively, whereas soybean and sunflower seed increased transfer efficiencies for C18:2n6 and C18:3n3 and their proportions in milk fat. Soybean, sunflower, or linseed supplied as oil increased trans-11-C18:1 proportions in milk fat, whereas the addition of fish oil to a diet containing soybean or sunflower decreased C18:0 and cis-9-C18:1 proportions in milk fat. The main forage type in the diet also significantly influenced the effect of dietary nutrient composition on milk fat content and milk FA profile, resulting in significant differences between main forage types in the diet within the different fat sources. Maize silage as the main forage type increased trans-11-C18:1 in unsupplemented diets or diets supplemented with a source of soybean or sunflower. For rapeseed supplemented diets, barley silage increased transfer efficiency and milk fat proportion of C18:2n6, whereas grass silage increased proportion of C18:3n3 in milk fat. For soybean or sunflower supplemented diets, haylage increased proportions of saturated FA, cis-9-C18:1 and C18:2n6, whereas the combination of maize silage and haylage increased transfer efficiency and milk fat proportion of C18:3n3. For linseed supplemented diets, grass silage as the main forage type resulted in the highest C18:3n3 proportion, whereas cis-9-C18:1 proportion was comparable for grass silage, lucerne silage and maize silage as the main forage type. This meta-analysis confirmed that the effect of dietary nutrient composition on several milk FA proportions depends on the type and form of fat supplementation, addition of fish oil, and main forage type in the basal diet.
    The Journal of Agricultural Science 08/2012; 150(04). · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Monensin is a common feed additive used in various countries, where 1 of the associated benefits for use in beef cattle is improved efficiency of energy metabolism by the rumen bacteria, the animal, or both. Modeling fermentation-altering supplements is of interest, and thus, it is the purpose of this paper to quantify the change in VFA profile caused by monensin dose in high-grain-fed beef cattle. The developmental database used for meta-analysis included 58 treatment means from 16 studies from the published literature, and the proportional change in molar acetate, propionate, and butyrate (mol/100 mol) as well as total VFA (mM) with monensin feeding dose (mg/kg DM, concentration in the feed) was evaluated using the MIXED procedure (SAS Inst. Inc., Cary, NC) with the study treated as a random effect. The mean monensin dose in the literature database was 30.9 ± 3.70 mg/kg DM and ranged from 0.0 to 88.0 mg/kg DM. Mean DMI was 7.8 ± 0.26 kg DM/d, mean concentrate proportion of the diet was 0.87 ± 0.01, and mean treatment period was 42 ± 5.6 d. Results produced the following equations: proportional change in acetate (mol/100 mol) = -0.0634 (± 0.0323) × monensin (mg/kg DM)/100 (P = 0.068), proportional change in propionate (mol/100 mol) = 0.260 (± 0.0735) × monensin (mg/kg DM)/100 (P = 0.003), and proportional change in butyrate (mol/100 mol) = -0.335 (± 0.0916) × monensin (mg/kg DM)/100 (P = 0.002). The change in total VFA was not significantly related to monensin dose (P = 0.93). The results presented here indicate that the shift in VFA profile may be dose dependent, with increasing propionate and decreasing acetate and butyrate proportions (mol/100 mol). These equations could be applied within mechanistic models of rumen fermentation to represent the effect of monensin dose on the VFA profile in high-grain-fed beef cattle.
    Journal of Animal Science 08/2012; 90(8):2717-26. · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this experiment was to study the effects of feeding different linseed sources on omasal fatty acid (FA) flows, and plasma and milk FA profiles in dairy cows. Four ruminally cannulated lactating Holstein-Friesian cows were assigned to 4 dietary treatments in a 4×4 Latin square design. Dietary treatments consisted of supplementing crushed linseed (CL), extruded whole linseed (EL), formaldehyde-treated linseed oil (FL) and linseed oil in combination with marine algae rich in docosahexaenoic acid (DL). Each period in the Latin square design lasted 21 d, with the first 16 d for adaptation. Omasal flow was estimated by the omasal sampling technique using Cr-EDTA, Yb-acetate, and acid detergent lignin as digesta flow markers. The average DM intake was 20.6 ± 2.5 kg/d, C18:3n-3 intake was 341 ± 51 g/d, and milk yield was 32.0 ± 4.6 kg/d. Milk fat yield was lower for the DL treatment (0.96 kg/d) compared with the other linseed treatments (CL, 1.36 kg/d; EL, 1.49 kg/d; FL, 1.54 kg/d). Omasal flow of C18:3n-3 was higher and C18:3n-3 biohydrogenation was lower for the EL treatment (33.8 g/d; 90.9%) compared with the CL (21.8 g/d; 94.0%), FL (15.5 g/d; 95.4%), and DL (4.6 g/d; 98.5%) treatments, whereas whole-tract digestibility of crude fat was lower for the EL treatment (64.8%) compared with the CL (71.3%), FL (78.5%), and DL (80.4%) treatments. The proportion of C18:3n-3 (g/100 g of FA) was higher for the FL treatment compared with the other treatments in plasma triacylglycerols (FL, 3.60; CL, 1.22; EL, 1.35; DL, 1.12) and milk fat (FL, 3.19; CL, 0.87; EL, 0.83; DL, 0.46). Omasal flow and proportion of C18:0 in plasma and milk fat were lower, whereas omasal flow and proportions of biohydrogenation intermediates in plasma and milk fat were higher for the DL treatment compared with the other linseed treatments. The results demonstrate that feeding EL did not result in a higher C18:3n-3 proportion in plasma and milk fat despite the higher omasal C18:3n-3 flow. This was related to the decreased total-tract digestibility of crude fat. Feeding FL resulted in a higher C18:3n-3 proportion in plasma and milk fat, although the omasal C18:3n-3 flow was similar or lower than for the CL and EL treatment, respectively. Feeding DL inhibited biohydrogenation of trans-11,cis-15-C18:2 to C18:0, as indicated by the increased omasal flows and proportions of biohydrogenation intermediates in plasma and milk fat.
    Journal of Dairy Science 06/2012; 95(6):3149-65. · 2.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Monensin is a common feed additive used in various countries, where one of the associated benefits for use in beef cattle is improved efficiency of energy metabolism by the rumen bacteria and/or the animal. Modeling fermentation-altering supplements is of interest, and thus it is the purpose of this paper to quantify the change in VFA profile caused by monensin dose in high-grain fed beef cattle. The developmental database used for meta-analysis included 58 treatment means from 16 studies from the published literature, and the proportional change in molar acetate, propionate and butyrate (mol/100mol) as well as total VFA (mM), with monensin feeding dose (mg/kg DM, concentration in the feed), was evaluated in PROC MIXED of SAS with study treated as a random effect. The mean monensin dose in the literature database was 30.9 ± 3.70 (mg/kg DM) and ranged from 0 to 88.0 mg/kg DM, mean DMI was 7.8 ± 0.26 (kg DM/d), mean concentrate proportion of the diet was 0.87 ± 0.01 and mean treatment period was 42 ± 5.6 d. Results produced the following equations: proportional change in acetate (mol/100 mol) = -0.0634 (± 0.0323) × monensin (mg/kg DM)/100 (P = 0.068), proportional change in propionate (mol/100 mol) = 0.260 (± 0.0735) × monensin (mg/kg DM)/100 (P = 0.003) and proportional change in butyrate (mol/100 mol) = -0.335 (± 0.0916) × monensin (mg/kg DM)/100 (P = 0.002). Change in total VFA was not significantly related to monensin dose (P = 0.93). Results presented here indicate that the shift in VFA profile may be dose dependent, with increasing propionate and decreasing acetate and butyrate proportions (mol/100 mol). These equations could be applied within mechanistic models of rumen fermentation to represent the effect of monensin dose on the VFA profile in high-grain fed beef cattle.
    Journal of Animal Science 05/2012; · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) is an important enzyme in the bovine mammary gland, where it inserts a cis-double bond at the Δ9 position in a wide range of fatty acids. Investigating SCD expression in the bovine mammary gland generally requires invasive biopsy to obtain mammary tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of milk somatic cells as a non-invasive alternative to biopsy for measuring mammary SCD expression in dairy cows. Both milk somatic cells and mammary tissue were collected from 14 Holstein-Friesian cows and used for analysis of SCD expression by real-time PCR. The SCD5 mRNA levels in mammary tissue compared with SCD1 were low, and for several milk somatic cell samples, SCD5 expression was even below the limit of detection. A significant relationship was found between SCD1 expression in milk somatic cells and in mammary tissue. In addition, SCD1 expression in milk somatic cells was significantly related to Δ9-desaturase indices in milk, which are commonly used as an indicator of SCD1 activity within the mammary gland. Our study showed that milk somatic cells can be used as a source of mRNA to study SCD1 expression in dairy cows, offering a non-invasive alternative to mammary tissue samples obtained by biopsy.
    J Anim Physiol a Anim Nutr 02/2012; · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of dietary nitrate on methane emission and rumen fermentation parameters in Nellore × Guzera (Bos indicus) beef cattle fed a sugarcane based diet. The experiment was conducted with 16 steers weighing 283 ± 49 kg (mean ± SD), 6 rumen cannulated and 10 intact steers, in a cross-over design. The animals were blocked according to BW and presence or absence of rumen cannula and randomly allocated to either the nitrate diet (22 g nitrate/kg DM) or the control diet made isonitrogenous by the addition of urea. The diets consisted of freshly chopped sugarcane and concentrate (60:40 on DM basis), fed as a mixed ration. A 16-d adaptation period was used to allow the rumen microbes to adapt to dietary nitrate. Methane emission was measured using the sulfur hexafluoride tracer technique. Dry matter intake (P = 0.09) tended to be less when nitrate was present in the diet compared with the control, 6.60 and 7.05 kg/d DMI, respectively. The daily methane production was reduced (P < 0.01) by 32% when steers were fed the nitrate diet (85 g/d) compared with the urea diet (125 g/d). Methane emission per kilogram DMI was 27% less (P < 0.01) on the nitrate diet (13.3 g methane/kg DMI) than on the control diet (18.2 g methane/kg DMI). Methane losses as a fraction of gross energy intake (GEI) were less (P < 0.01) on the nitrate diet (4.2% of GEI) than on the control diet (5.9% of GEI). Nitrate mitigated enteric methane production by 87% of the theoretical potential. The rumen fluid ammonia-nitrogen (NH(3)-N()) concentration was significantly greater (P < 0.05) for the nitrate diet. The total concentration of VFA was not affected (P = 0.61) by nitrate in the diet, while the proportion of acetic acid tended to be greater (P = 0.09), propionic acid less (P = 0.06) and acetate/propionate ratio tended to be greater (P = 0.06) for the nitrate diet. Dietary nitrate reduced enteric methane emission in beef cattle fed sugarcane based diet.
    Journal of Animal Science 01/2012; 90(7):2317-23. · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: High-sugar grass varieties have received considerable attention for their potential ability to decrease N excretion in cattle. However, feeding high-sugar grasses alters the pattern of rumen fermentation, and no in vivo studies to date have examined this strategy with respect to another environmental pollutant: methane (CH(4)). Modeling allows us to examine potential outcomes of feeding strategies under controlled conditions, and can provide a useful framework for the development of future experiments. The purpose of the present study was to use a modeling approach to evaluate the effect of high-sugar grasses on simulated CH(4) emissions in dairy cattle. An extant dynamic, mechanistic model of enteric fermentation and intestinal digestion was used for this evaluation. A simulation database was constructed and analysis of model behavior was undertaken to simulate the effect of (1) level of water-soluble carbohydrate (WSC) increase in dietary dry matter, (2) change in crude protein (CP) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) content of the plant with an increased WSC content, (3) level of N fertilization, and (4) presence or absence of grain feeding. Simulated CH(4) emissions tended to increase with increased WSC content when CH(4) was expressed as megajoules per day or percent of gross energy intake, but when CH(4) was expressed in terms of grams per kilogram of milk, results were much more variable due to the potential increase in milk yield. As a result, under certain conditions, CH(4) (g/kg of milk) decreased. The largest increases in CH(4) emissions (MJ/d or % gross energy intake) were generally seen when WSC increased at the expense of CP in the diet and this can largely be explained by the representation in the model of the type of volatile fatty acid produced. Effects were lower when WSC increased at the expense of NDF, and intermediary when WSC increased at the expense of a mixture of CP and NDF. When WSC increased at the expense of NDF, simulated milk yield increased and, therefore, CH(4) (g/kg of milk) tended to decrease. Diminished increases of CH(4) (% gross energy intake or g/kg of milk) were simulated when DMI was increased with elevated WSC content. Simulation results suggest that high WSC grass, as a strategy to mitigate N emission, may increase CH(4) emissions, but that results depend on the grass composition, DMI, and the units chosen to express CH(4). Overall, this project demonstrates the usefulness of modeling for hypothesis testing in the absence of observed experimental results.
    Journal of Dairy Science 01/2012; 95(1):272-85. · 2.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Volatile fatty acids (VFA) and lactic acid can build up in the rumen and reduce ruminal pH. Low ruminal pH for prolonged periods each day can affect feed intake, microbial metabolism and feed digestion, and has also been related to inflammation, diarrhea and milk fat depression. This paper considers aspects of pH regulation, as well as the effects of ruminal pH on rate of substrate degradation and on the profile of VFA available for absorption. Removal of VFA from the rumen by passage in the liquid phase and by absorption through the rumen wall are major processes that influence ruminal pH. The buffering capacity (BC) of rumen fluid is variable and is generally assumed to depend primarily on bicarbonate. Bicarbonate-dependent absorption is not just a primary absorption pathway of VFA but can also secrete bicarbonate at a capacity equal to that from saliva, thus removing protons from the rumen by neutralization. In addition, the inherent BC of the diet is involved in pH regulation, largely explained by the cation exchange capacity of feedstuffs. Empirical models to predict ruminal pH have had limited success. The inclusion of dietary characteristics in those models is needed to improve prediction accuracy. Representations of the effect of pH on fiber degradation adopted in models of ruminal function differ widely and include linear decline, saturation-type and sigmoidal relationships. In comparison with pH effects on degradation of fiber in sacco, most representations tend to overestimate the inhibiting effect of pH. Because the products of fiber hydrolysis are a major source of energy for microbial growth in the rumen, proper understanding and representation of fiber degradation at low pH is vital to predict microbial protein supply and VFA production satisfactorily. Variation in VFA profile is associated with variation in methane production, nutrient partitioning and milk composition. Various ruminal bacterial species have been observed to shift pathways in response to changes in pH while fermenting the same substrate. Mechanistic rumen models have adopted VFA stoichiometric coefficients related to type of substrate present in the feed or fermented in the rumen, but the majority of models do not include the effect of pH on VFA profile. In conclusion, ruminal pH is a major determinant of the profile of nutrients available for absorption. Shifting focus to factors other than salivary bicarbonate secretion will aid in better understanding ruminal pH regulation. Improved models to predict effects of ruminal pH on microbial metabolism and VFA profile will enable further optimization of dairy cow nutrition
    Animal Feed Science and Technology - ANIM FEED SCI TECH. 01/2012; 172:22-33.
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    ABSTRACT: Strong adaptive changes occur in the peri-parturient dairy cow related to a marked rise in dry matter intake and alteration in diet composition after calving. Early lactation dairy cattle are susceptible to metabolic disorders and impaired rumen function during the transition period, with detrimental effects on cow performance. For a quantitative understanding of the dietary effects on rumen function, several classes of influencing factors can be distinguished (intrinsic degradation characteristics of feed, characteristics of microbial activity, rumen fermentation conditions, rumen wall function). Interpretation of experimental results requires all these factors to be taken into consideration simultaneously. This contribution aimed to review the capacity of the rumen wall to adapt to the marked increase in feed intake by the post-parturient dairy cow. While the principle of distinct adaptations of the post-parturient rumen wall is generally accepted, literature is not always conclusive about the size of the effects. Virtually all studies on adaptation of the post-parturient rumen wall were performed post-mortem and with isolated tissue in vitro. Therefore, an in vivo trial with twelve rumen fistulated dairy cows is presented to support and discuss the various factors involved in this review. A faster (in 10 d) versus a slower (in 20 d) increment of starch-rich concentrate intake after calving was evaluated for effects on adaptive response of rumen epithelia and altered rumen functioning up to twelve weeks after calving. Results showed transient changes in rumen epithelia and suggest a different adaptive response of rumen epithelia during the first weeks of lactation due to differences in supplemental concentrate feeding. No evidence was found for any detrimental effect of a fast increment of concentrate intake on dry matter intake, rumen fermentation, and cow performance. Results in literature either confirm or contradict these findings, and they attribute either a more important role to molecular mechanisms in rumen epithelia or to cell proliferation and epithelial morphology. The different research methods adopted and the high variability of results obtained with this type of research strongly limit our understanding of the relative importance of cell metabolic changes, epithelia proliferation and rumen wall morphology. In conclusion, the ruminal epithelia in the peri-parturient cow responds in a coordinated manner to rapid dietary changes which is of high significance to maintain normal rumen function
    Animal Feed Science and Technology - ANIM FEED SCI TECH. 01/2012; 172:80-94.
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    ABSTRACT: The flow of ciliate protozoa from the reticulo-rumen is significantly less than expected given the total density of rumen protozoa present. To maintain their numbers in the reticulo-rumen, protozoa can be selectively retained through association with feed particles and the rumen wall. Few mathematical models have been designed to model rumen protozoa in both the free-living and attached phases, and the data used in the models were acquired using classical techniques. It has therefore become necessary to provide an updated model that more accurately represents these microorganisms and incorporates the recent literature on distribution, sequestration, and generation times. This paper represents a novel approach to synthesizing experimental data on rumen microorganisms in a quantitative and structured manner. The development of a linear programming model of rumen protozoa in an approximate steady state will be described and applied to data from healthy ruminants consuming commonly fed diets. In the model, protozoa associated with the liquid phase and protozoa attached to particulate matter or sequestered against the rumen wall are distinguished. Growth, passage, death, and transfer of protozoa between both pools are represented. The results from the model application using the contrasting diets of increased forage content versus increased starch content indicate that the majority of rumen protozoa, 63 to 90%, are found in the attached phase, either attached to feed particles or sequestered on the rumen wall. A slightly greater proportion of protozoa are found in the attached phase in animals fed a hay diet compared with a starch diet. This suggests that experimental protocols that only sample protozoa from the rumen fluid could be significantly underestimating the size of the protozoal population of the rumen. Further data are required on the distribution of ciliate protozoa in the rumen of healthy animals to improve model development, but the model described herein does indicate that the attached protozoal population is a significant component of the total rumen protozoal community.
    Journal of Dairy Science 01/2012; 95(1):255-65. · 2.57 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Applied Social Psychology - J APPL SOC PSYCHOL. 01/2012;

Publication Stats

2k Citations
305.98 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1993–2014
    • Wageningen University
      • Department of Animal Nutrition
      Wageningen, Gelderland, Netherlands
  • 2011–2013
    • University of California, Davis
      • Department of Animal Science
      Davis, CA, United States
    • University of Guelph
      • Department of Animal and Poultry Science
      Guelph, Ontario, Canada
    • University of Newcastle
      Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia
  • 2012
    • Provimi BV
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2008–2009
    • Ghent University
      • Faculty of Bioscience Engineering
      Gent, VLG, Belgium
    • University of Manitoba
      • Department of Animal Science
      Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
  • 2004
    • University of Kaposvár
      Toponár, Somogy, Hungary
  • 1999–2004
    • University of Reading
      • • School of Agriculture, Policy and Development
      • • Department of Agriculture
      Reading, ENG, United Kingdom
    • Universidad de León
      • Departamento de Producción Animal
      León, Castile and Leon, Spain