James Anderson

University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Are you James Anderson?

Claim your profile

Publications (7)0 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes how simulations can be used to reason about the impact of user interface design features in exploring the effect of different contexts of use on the occurrence of technology-induced errors. The paper describes our approach in several phases, using an example from the analysis of technology-induced errors in medication administration. In the initial phase a clinical simulation is conducted to gather baseline data on the occurrence of technology-induced error using the technology under study. In this phase of the study, data arising from the clinical simulation are collected and then analyzed using qualitative and quantitative approaches to assess the relationship between aspects of interface design (i.e. usability problems) and rates of technology-induced error. In the next phase, the base rates for error associated with specific types of usability problems (from the initial phase) form the input into computer-based mathematical simulations. This approach links clinical simulations with computer-based simulations and demonstrates the potential impact of aspects of interface design and contextual factors upon medical error along with the implications for correcting interface design issues.
    Studies in health technology and informatics 01/2013; 194:154-9.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Use of simulations in health informatics is a rapidly expanding field of study. With the exponential rise in the development and implementation of health information systems globally by health care consumers and other health care organizations (e.g., clinics and hospitals), there has developed a growing need to evaluate these applications for their health care system effects. Current estimates suggest up to 65% of health information system applications fail to be adopted by health professionals (Rabinowitz et al., 1999). As well, many health information systems and devices fail to be used to their fullest extent by the individuals for whom they have been designed (such as patients, physicians, nurses and other health professionals). In addition to this, research has emerged suggesting that health information systems may negatively affect health professionals work processes through the introduction of cumbersome workflows (Kushniruk et al., 2006) and may inadvertently facilitate medical errors (i.e. technology-induced errors) (Koppel et al., 2005; Kushniruk et al., 2005). Health informatics researchers have shown that clinical simulations, computer-based simulations and hybrid simulations can be used to test software applications for tasktechnology fit, their error facilitating features and functions, their effects on health care organizations and health care systems. Simulations can be used to evaluate software applications/devices. Clinical simulations can be used to evaluate the effects of differing constellations of software applications and devices upon aspects of health professional work (i.e., work processes and outcomes) with considerable ability to predict possible issues associated with software application and/or device usage (Borycki et al., 2009b). Such knowledge can provide organizations with information that can influence their decisionmaking during the organizational processes of procurement, selection and implementation of systems that can prevent downstream costs associated with application modification and switching to devices that better support health professional work. Future research will involve extending simulation from clinical and computer-based simulations to those involving computer controlled mannequins involving simulated electronic health records in virtual reality environments and virtual worlds.
    03/2010; , ISBN: 978-953-307-055-1
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Research has indicated that health information technology has the potential to reduce medical error and the chances of an adverse event occurring. However, research has indicated that poorly designed systems may inadvertently lead to error (technology-induced error). In this paper, we describe our most recent work in developing a new framework for the integration of multiple forms of simulation to ensure that systems are safe by predicting and preventing technology-induced error in healthcare. The approach taken involves the integration of "clinical simulations" with computer-based simulations. In a case study, the combination of clinical simulations (i.e., involving video analysis of health professionals interacting with computerized physician order entry) and the use of computer modelling and simulation tools is described. In our work, we first employ clinical simulation to obtain baseline error rates. Next, we input data from the clinical simulations into a computer-based simulation and modelling tool to assess the impact of specific aspects of system and interface design upon error rates. The practical implications of combining the advantages of clinical simulation with "in the box" computer-based simulation to predict the impact of healthcare information systems (HIS) are discussed. Implications of this work for healthcare institutions and policy decision-making are explored.
    Healthcare quarterly (Toronto, Ont.) 01/2009; 12 Spec No Patient:90-6.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Patient safety is a critical issue in healthcare. The Institute of Medicine[1] estimates up to 98,000 hopitalized patients die annually as a result if medical error. Nurses serve as a hospital unit's twenty-four hour surveillance team[2]. Assesment of patient condition, evaluation of physician orders, administration of medications, and supervision of patient activity are all safety functions which fall within the nurse's scope of practice. Health care organizations have introduced a variety of technological upgrades and structural changes in an effort to encourage a system, or root cause, approach to error reduction. However, these changes have failed to provide an adequate reduction in error. Because nurses play an integral role in patient safety, the solution may lie within the work of the nurses.
    RCHE Publications. 01/2007;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Project Goals and Objectives: To examine developmental trends in the effectivenes of data sharing regarding medication errors in hospitals. To use the results to assist hospitals to improve patient safety by reducing medication errors.
    RCHE Presentations. 01/2007;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this study we describe a computer simulation model that can be used to explore organizational changes that are required to improve patient safety based on a medication error reporting system.
    RCHE Publications.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this reserach ewas to develop a computer simulation model that represents the porcess through which physicians enter orders into a hospital information system(HIS).
    RCHE Publications.