Summer B Dewdney

University of Washington Seattle, Seattle, WA, United States

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Publications (14)52.5 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Recent reports have suggested that uterine manipulators can induce lymphovascular space involvement (LVSI) by endometrial cancer in laparoscopic hysterectomy specimens. The prognostic significance of this phenomenon known as "vascular pseudo invasion" remains elusive. The authors conducted a retrospective, single institution study of patients who underwent initial surgery for grade 1 and grade 2 endometrioid endometrial cancers with LVSI. Cases were stratified by surgical approach (laparoscopy vs laparotomy). Clinicopathologic and procedure characteristics as well as outcome data were analyzed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Disease-free survival (DFS) was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier product limit method. A total of 104 cases (20 laparoscopic, 84 laparotomy) were analyzed. Mean age (65 vs 64 years, respectively), stage distribution, mean number of lymph nodes sampled (18 vs 21, respectively) and use of adjuvant therapy was similar for both groups (p > 0.05). Mean body mass index (BMI) was 30 vs 35 kg/m2, respectively (p = 0.002). Mean follow up was 24 months (range 0.1-102). Univariate analysis demonstrated that LVSI in the laparoscopic setting was associated with worse DFS (p = 0.002). After adjusting for grade the risk of recurrence remained higher for laparoscopic cases (HR: 15.7, 95% CI 1.7-140.0, p = 0.014). Adjusted risk of recurrence associated with LVSI is higher in cases approached laparoscopically arguing against the concept of "vascular pseudo invasion" associated with the use of uterine manipulators and balloons. LVSI should be regarded as a serious risk factor and taken into account for triage to adjuvant therapies, even in laparoscopically treated early-stage endometrial cancer.
    European journal of gynaecological oncology 01/2014; 35(1):7-10. · 0.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: High-grade malignancies are the leading cause of death from gynecological tumors. Unfortunately, no efficient screening method is available for these tumors. In this paper we report the results of a pilot study based on the frequency of TP53 mutations in these cancers. Mucus from the cervix of 32 hysterectomy specimens with no grossly visible cervical or serosal involvement were included in this study. TP53 exons 5-9 mutations were screened for mutations using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Immunostain for p53 protein was performed in all fallopian tubes and in a sample from the tumors that were identified prospectively. A total of 32 cases including 19 malignant, and 13 benign cases were included. P53 immunostain was positive in only 5 cases including 3 high grade malignant tumors and 2 precancerous lesions (serous tubal intraepithelial lesion or p53 signature) in the fallopian tubes. A TP53 mutation band pattern was detected by SSCP in 2/3 and 2/2 cases respectively. Twenty-seven cases were negative for p53 imunostain, 4 of which were positive for TP53 mutation by SSCP including 3 low-grade malignancies. The results of this study provide evidence that DNA from precursor lesions of high grade ovarian, fallopian tube and endometrial carcinomas can be detected in cervical mucus. Further studies using different markers, in preoperative setting and large scale screening studies will determine the utility of using cervical mucus to screen for gynecological malignancies.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 14 June 2013; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2013.92.
    Modern Pathology 06/2013; · 5.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Squamous differentiation (SD) and morular metaplasia (MM) are frequently present in uterine endometrioid adenocarcinoma (EAC) and can mimic areas of solid tumor. We used immunohistochemical stains to further characterize these lesions, and to determine which markers would help to distinguish these metaplasias from areas of solid growth in EAC. The pathology database was searched for diagnoses of EAC from 1997 to 2007, the hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides were reviewed, and 143 cases with SD, MM, or both (SD+MM) were identified. A panel of immunohistochemical stains was performed. In particular, we were interested in PAX2 and PAX8, recently studied markers of Müllerian tissue as potential markers for differentiation of metaplasias and tumor. In addition, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, and Her-2/neu, were examined to determine whether there was a differential expression between the metaplasias and solid tumor that may be diagnostically useful. In addition, to further characterize MM and SD, bcl-2 as a marker of cell regulation and inhibition of apoptosis, p16 as a surrogate marker for human papillomavirus, and p63 as a marker of mature SD were studied. Adjacent normal endometrium (NEM), when present, and 20 EAC cases (FIGO Grades 1-3) without SD or MM served as controls. PAX2 was positive in NEM (58/61, 95%) and was lost in SD (15/136, 11%), MM (1/25, 4%), and EAC (57/163, 35%), whereas PAX8 was positive in all NEM (61/61, 100%) and in the majority of SD (125/136, 92%), MM (19/25, 73%), and EAC (162/163, 99%). The estrogen receptor and the progesterone receptor were expressed by the majority of EAC (148/163, 91% and 144/163, 88%, respectively), whereas both were markedly diminished in SD (56/136, 41% and 58/136, 43%) and MM (4/25, 16% and 2/25, 8%). Approximately half of the MM was positive for bcl-2 (12/25, 48%), making it an unreliable marker. Her-2/neu was negative in all cases (0%). p16 was patchy in SD (111/136, 82%), MM (22/25, 88%), and EAC (154/163, 94%), whereas p63 was predominantly positive only in SD (96/136, 71%). Estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, PAX2, and PAX8 were helpful in differentiating MM from SD, EAC, or NEM (P<0.05). In addition, p63 distinguished between SD and MM, supporting the theory that morules do not show characteristic mature SD.
    International journal of gynecological pathology: official journal of the International Society of Gynecological Pathologists 03/2013; · 2.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Serous uterine cancer is not a feature of any known hereditary cancer syndrome. This study evaluated familial risk of cancers for patients with serous uterine carcinoma, focusing on Lynch syndrome malignancies. Fifty serous or mixed serous endometrial carcinoma cases were prospectively enrolled. Pedigrees were developed for 29 probands and tumors were assessed for DNA mismatch repair (MMR) abnormalities. Standardized incidence ratios for cancers in relatives were estimated. A second-stage analysis was undertaken using data from Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG)-210. Incidence data for cancers reported in relatives of 348 patients with serous and mixed epithelial and 624 patients with endometrioid carcinoma were compared. Nineteen of 29 (65.5%) patients in the single-institution series reported a Lynch-related cancer in relatives. Endometrial and ovarian cancers were significantly overrepresented and a high number of probands (6 of 29, 20.7%) reported pancreatic cancers. None of the probands' tumors had DNA MMR abnormalities. There was no difference in endometrial or ovarian cancer incidence in relatives of serous and endometrioid cancer probands in the case-control study. Pancreatic cancers were, however, significantly more common in relatives of patients with serous cancer [OR, 2.39; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-5.38]. We identified an excess of endometrial, ovarian, and pancreatic cancers in relatives of patients with serous cancer in a single-institution study. Follow-up studies suggest that only pancreatic cancers are overrepresented in relatives. DNA MMR defects in familial clustering of pancreatic and other Lynch-associated malignancies are unlikely. The excess of pancreatic cancers in relatives may reflect an as yet unidentified hereditary syndrome that includes uterine serous cancers.
    Cancer Prevention Research 03/2012; 5(3):435-43. · 4.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the utility of liquid-based cytology in detecting recurrent cervical cancer among treated cervical cancer patients. A retrospective multi-institution study identified patients treated for cervical cancer from January 1, 2000, to November 1, 2009, through local cancer registries and patient databases. Patients were excluded if they lacked follow-up or treatment data. In all, 4,167 cytology results from 929 women were identified. Of these, 626 (15%) Pap test results from 312 (34%) women were abnormal, including 296 atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US; 47%); 179 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL; 29%), 59 atypical squamous cells, cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASC-H; 9%); 55 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL; 9%); 14 atypical glandular cells (2%), and 23 favor neoplasia (4%). Abnormal Pap test results led to 201 colposcopies in 135 women. Only 45 women had cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2 or worse, 25 had CIN 3, and 12 had cancer. Only 5 of 475 (1%) women with ASC-US or LSIL had CIN 3. Cancer recurred in 147 women, with 12 (8.1%) detected by Pap test; all but one had Pap test results of ASC-H or worse. One patient with ASC-US and human papillomavirus had a visible lesion on return for assessment 2 months after Pap testing. Colposcopy for cytology less than HSIL without a visible lesion on examination did not detect any recurrence or CIN 3. When stratified by stage and institution, patients treated with radiation had a higher risk of abnormal Pap test results (P<.001). A third of cervical cancer survivors will have abnormal cytology during follow-up, but in the absence of a visible lesion, those with ASC-US or LSIL can be followed without colposcopy unless abnormalities persist. Women with ASC-H, HSIL, and similar abnormalities deserve colposcopy. II.
    Obstetrics and Gynecology 09/2011; 118(3):548-53. · 4.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Uterine artery embolization is a common procedure for symptomatic leiomyomas and is being used as a less invasive alternative to a hysterectomy. This is a report of an uteroenteric fistula after uterine artery embolization. A 50-year-old woman developed an uteroenteric fistula that was seen on a computed tomography scan 6 months after she had an uncomplicated uterine artery embolization for symptomatic leiomyomas. She was managed surgically with a hysterectomy and small bowel resection with reanastomosis. Uteroenteric fistula can occur as a complication of uterine artery embolization for leiomyoma management.
    Obstetrics and Gynecology 08/2011; 118(2 Pt 2):434-6. · 4.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Venous thrombosis is a frequent complication of gynecologic cancer. Data regarding the use of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters in this population is limited. The aim of this study was to review our experience with gynecologic oncology patients who received an IVC filter, specifically to evaluate indications for filter placement and survival outcomes. This was a retrospective, single-institution study of patients who had an IVC filter placed after a histologically confirmed gynecologic malignancy. Patients were identified from a prospectively collected interventional radiology (IR) database. Clinicopathologic characteristics, procedure details, and outcome data were obtained from outpatient and inpatient medical records. Survival after IVC filter placement was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier product limit method and compared by log-rank test. A total of 128 patients were identified and 103 were found to be eligible for analysis. Most patients had ovarian cancer (52%), followed by cervical cancer (25%) and endometrial cancer (21%). Two-thirds had advanced stage disease (III/IV). The procedure complication rate was 2%. Median survival after IVC filter placement was 7.8months (95% CI, 4.1-13.6). The most common indication for IVC filter placement was contraindication to anticoagulation secondary to hemorrhage (44%), followed by perioperative indications (30%) and failed anticoagulation (14%). There was no difference in survival by IVC filter placement indication (p=0.18). The majority of the IVC filters placed were permanent (90.5%) and in an infrarenal position (95.8%). There was no difference in survival according to specific thromboembolic event (DVT vs. PE vs. both). Patients able to receive anticoagulation after IVC filter placement had improved survival (HR 0.45, 95%CI 0.45-0.27, p=0.003). We present the largest series of gynecologic oncology patients treated with IVC filters. Long-term survival after IVC filter placement is uncommon. Patients who receive anticoagulation after IVC filter placement have an improved survival over those who do not receive anticoagulation; this difference in survival may be secondary to worsening disease causing contraindications to anticoagulation.
    Gynecologic Oncology 05/2011; 121(2):344-6. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Effective treatments for advanced endometrial cancer are lacking. Novel therapies that target specific pathways hold promise for better treatment outcomes with less toxicity. Mutation activation of the FGFR2/RAS/ERK pathway is important in endometrial tumorigenesis. RPS6KA6 (RSK4) is a putative tumor suppressor gene and is a target of the ERK signaling pathway. We explored the role of RSK4 in endometrial cancer. We showed that RSK4 is expressed in normal endometrial tissue and is absent or much reduced in endometrial cancer. On the basis of previous reports on methylation in other cancers, we hypothesized that the absence of RSK4 transcript is associated with epigenetic silencing rather than mutation. We determined the methylation and expression status of RSK4 in primary endometrial cancers and cell lines and the effects of treatment with a demethylating agent. The relationship between RSK4 methylation and clinicopathologic features was assessed. RSK4 is frequently hypermethylated in endometrial cancer cells lines and in primary endometrial cancer compared with normal endometrial tissue. RSK4 methylation was significantly associated with tumor grade, with higher grade tumors having lower levels of methylation (P = 0.03). RSK4 methylation levels were not associated with other clinical variables. We did find that RSK4 methylation was significantly correlated with expression in primary endometrial tumors and in cell lines. Reactivation of RSK4 by 5-azacytidine was successfully performed showing 8- to more than 1,200-fold increases in transcript levels. RSK4 appears to be epigenetically silenced in endometrial cancer as evidenced by hypermethylation. Its role as a suppressor in endometrial cancer, however, remains uncertain.
    Clinical Cancer Research 03/2011; 17(8):2120-9. · 7.84 Impact Factor
  • Gynecologic Oncology 03/2011; 120. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent randomized controlled data suggest that neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) with interval debulking (ID) may produce similar overall survival and progression free survival compared to standard primary cytoreduction followed by chemotherapy. The object of our study was to assess current patterns of care among members of the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists (SGO), specifically collating their opinions on and use of NACT for advanced stage ovarian cancer. A 20-item questionnaire was sent to all working e-mail addresses of SGO members (n=1137). The data was collected and analyzed using descriptive statistics with commercially available online survey software. The Chi-square test for independence was used to determine differences in responses between groups. Of 339 (30%) responding members, most rarely employ NACT, with 60% of respondents using NACT in less than 10% of advanced stage ovarian cancer cases. Respondents did not consider available evidence sufficient to justify NACT followed by ID (82%), nor did most think it should be preferred (74%). Sixty-two percent of respondents thought it was impossible to accurately predict preoperatively whether an optimal cytoreduction is possible. Thirty-nine percent believed that women with bulky upper abdominal disease on preoperative imaging would benefit from NACT versus primary debulking. If gross disease were found at ID, 43% would continue to treat with IV chemotherapy, and 42% would place an IP port if optimally cytoreduced. When ID reveals microscopic disease, 51% would continue IV treatment and the remaining IP therapy. Eighty-six percent of the respondents believed that both biological and surgical factors determine patient outcomes. The majority of responding SGO members do not treat patients with NACT followed by ID. Currently available studies of NACT/ID have been insufficient to convince most gynecologic oncologists to incorporate it into practice. Our results provide a benchmark against which further research can assess the penetration of NACT/ID into clinical practice.
    Gynecologic Oncology 10/2010; 119(1):18-21. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    S B Dewdney, D G Mutch
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    ABSTRACT: Endometrial cancer is the most common cancer of the female genital tract in the USA and usually presents at an early stage. Most women are cured with surgery, however, some patients may require adjuvant therapy including radiation and/or chemotherapy. Risk factors determine the need for adjuvant treatment and, based on these risk factors, patients are categorized as being at low, intermediate or high risk for recurrence. In this article we will review the best level of evidence available for the use of radiation therapy within each risk stratum. The most controversy and debate is associated with patients stratified to the intermediate-risk group.
    Women s Health 09/2010; 6(5):695-703; quiz 704.
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    ABSTRACT: In the roundtable that follows, clinicians discuss a study published in this issue of the Journal in light of its methodology, relevance to practice, and implications for future research.
    American journal of obstetrics and gynecology 02/2010; 202(2):e1-3. · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The article below summarizes a roundtable discussion of a study published in this issue of the Journal in light of its methodology, relevance to practice, and implications for future research. Article discussed: Heisler CA, Aletti GD, Weaver AL, et al. Improving quality of care: development of a risk-adjusted perioperative morbidity model for vaginal hysterectomy. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2010;202:137.e1-5. The full discussion appears at www.AJOG.org, pages e1-3.
    American journal of obstetrics and gynecology 02/2010; 202(2):203-204. · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent data has highlighted the role of PET/CT in the pretreatment evaluation and follow-up of patients with cervical cancer. The objective of our study was to assess the acceptance of PET/CT into the management of patients with cervical cancer. We also explored potential barriers to the use of these imaging modalities in patients with cervical cancer. A 14-item electronic questionnaire was initially sent to all working addresses of members of the SGO (n=1048). An opt-out option was offered. For members who did not respond within 3 weeks, a second electronic invitation was sent. A third request was finally sent to further improve response rates. Data were collected and analyzed using a commercially available on-line survey database. A total of 305 responses were collected for an overall 30% response rate. PET/CT appears to be widely available (99%) and accessible (75%) in most practices. Although 83% of members order routine CT imaging for all newly diagnosed cervical cancer cases, only 28% routinely order a PET/CT. Conversely, 64% would order a PET/CT for newly diagnosed patients with advanced disease or those at high risk for distant metastatic disease. Most members (82%) do not routinely use PET/CT to assess response to treatment. Twenty percent of members believe that no useful prognostic information can be obtained from routine use of molecular imaging in patients with cervical cancer. The most common barriers for use of PET/CT cited by members were perceived lack of third-party payer coverage and lack of scientific evidence. Despite clear scientific data supporting the use of PET/CT in patients with cervical cancer and apparent widespread availability, this imaging modality remains highly underutilized in clinical practice. Clarifying insurance coverage early in the evaluation process and replicating studies that have shown effectiveness of PET/CT in multiple roles may improve adoption of this potentially useful imaging modality.
    Gynecologic Oncology 06/2009; 114(2):310-4. · 3.93 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

42 Citations
52.50 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010–2012
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Seattle, WA, United States
    • Washington University in St. Louis
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      San Luis, Missouri, United States
    • Barnes Jewish Hospital
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Saint Louis, MO, United States