B. de la Lande

Institut Curie - Hôpital René Huguenin, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (13)37.93 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: PurposeNeoadjuvant chemotherapy generally induces significant changes in the pathological extent of disease and challenges the standard indications of adjuvant postmastectomy radiation therapy. We retrospectively evaluated the impact of postmastectomy radiation therapy in breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
    Cancer Radiotherapie - CANCER RADIOTHER. 12/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy generally induces significant changes in the pathological extent of disease and challenges the standard indications of adjuvant postmastectomy radiation therapy. We retrospectively evaluated the impact of postmastectomy radiation therapy in breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among 1054 breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy in our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 patients had pN0 status after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy. Demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The impact of postmastectomy radiation therapy on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival was evaluated by multivariate analysis including known prognostic factors. Among 134 eligible patients, 78 patients (58.2%) received postmastectomy radiation therapy, and 56 patients (41.8%) did not. With a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 10-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival rates were 96.2% and 77.2% with postmastectomy radiation therapy and 86.8% and 87.7% without radiation therapy, respectively (no significant difference). In multivariate analysis, there was a trend towards poorer overall survival among patients who did not have a pathologically complete primary tumour response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (hazard ratio [HR], 6.65; 95% CI, 0.82-54.12; P=0.076). Postmastectomy radiation therapy had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (HR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.09-1.61; P=0.18) or overall survival (HR, 2.06; 95% CI, 0.71-6; P=0.18). There was a trend towards poorer overall survival among patients who did not have pathologically complete in-breast tumour response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (HR, 6.65; 95% CI, 0.82-54.12; P=0.076). This retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence or death when postmastectomy radiation therapy was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy. Whether the omission of postmastectomy radiation therapy is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively.
    Cancer/Radiothérapie 08/2011; 15(8):675-82. · 1.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 03/2011; 82(1):e1-7. · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy generally induces significant changes in the pathological extent of disease. This potential down-staging challenges the standard indications of adjuvant radiation therapy. We assessed the utility of lymph node irradiation in breast cancer patients with pathological N0 status (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and breast-conserving surgery. Among 1054 breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy in our institution between 1990 and 2004, 248 patients with clinical N0 or N1-N2 lymph node status at diagnosis had pN0 status after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and breast-conserving surgery. Cox regression analysis was used to identify factors influencing locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival and overall survival. All 248 patients received breast irradiation, and 158 patients (63.7%) also received lymph node irradiation. With a median follow-up of 88 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival rates were respectively 89.4% and 88.7% with lymph node irradiation and 86.2% and 92% without lymph node irradiation (no significant difference). Survival was poorer among patients who did not have a pathological complete primary tumor response (pCR) (hazards ratio [HR]=3.05; 95% CI, 1.17 to 7.99) and in patients with N1-N2 clinical status at diagnosis ([HR]=2.24; 95% CI, 1.15 to 4.36). Lymph node irradiation did not significantly affect survival. Relative to combined breast and local lymph node irradiation, isolated breast irradiation does not appear to be associated with a higher risk of locoregional relapse or death among breast cancer patients with pN0 status after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. These results need to be confirmed in a prospective study.
    Cancer/Radiothérapie 12/2010; 14(8):711-7. · 1.48 Impact Factor
  • Cancer/Radiothérapie 10/2010; 14(6):661-661. · 1.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Radiation therapy appears to kill cells mainly by inducing DNA double-strand breaks. We investigated whether the DNA repair gene expression status might influence the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) in breast cancer patients. We used a quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR-based approach to measure messenger RNA levels of 20 selected DNA repair genes in tumor samples from 97 breast cancer patients enrolled in a phase III trial (Centre René Huguenin cohort). Normalized mRNA levels were tested for an association with LRR-free survival (LRR-FS) and overall survival (OS). The findings were validated in comparison with those of an independent cohort (Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) cohort). Multivariate analysis encompassing known prognostic factors was used to assess the association between DNA repair gene expression and patient outcome. RAD51 was the only gene associated with LRR in both cohorts. With a median follow-up of 126 months in the CRH cohort, the 5-year LRR-FS and OS rates were 100% and 95% in the 61 patients with low RAD51 expression, compared with 70% and 69% in the 36 patients with high RAD51 expression, respectively (p < 0.001). RAD51 overexpression was associated with a higher risk of LRR (hazard ratio [HR], 12.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.6-45.6) and death (HR, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.7-9.7). RAD51 overexpression was also significantly associated with shorter LRR-FS and OS in the NKI cohort. Overexpression of RAD51, a key component of the homologous DNA repair pathway, is associated with poor breast cancer outcome. This finding warrants prospective studies of RAD51 as a prognosticator and therapeutic target.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 10/2010; 78(2):328-36. · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) generally induces significant changes in the pathologic extent of disease. This potential down-staging challenges the standard indications of adjuvant radiation therapy. We assessed the utility of lymph node irradiation (LNI) in breast cancer (BC) patients with pathologic N0 status (pN0) after NAC and breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Among 1,054 BC patients treated with NAC in our institution between 1990 and 2004, 248 patients with clinical N0 or N1 to N2 lymph node status at diagnosis had pN0 status after NAC and BCS. Cox regression analysis was used to identify factors influencing locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRR-FS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). All 248 patients underwent breast irradiation, and 158 patients (63.7%) also received LNI. With a median follow-up of 88 months, the 5-year LRR-FS and OS rates were respectively 89.4% and 88.7% with LNI and 86.2% and 92% without LNI (no significant difference). Survival was poorer among patients who did not have a pathologic complete primary tumor response (hazard ratio, 3.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-7.99) and in patients with N1 to N2 clinical status at diagnosis (hazard ratio = 2.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-4.36). LNI did not significantly affect survival. Relative to combined breast and local lymph node irradiation, isolated breast irradiation does not appear to be associated with a higher risk of locoregional relapse or death among cN0 to cN2 breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC. These results need to be confirmed in a prospective study.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 02/2010; 78(2):337-42. · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several studies suggest that surgical excision of the primary tumor improves survival among patients with stage IV breast cancer at diagnosis. Exclusive locoregional radiotherapy (LRR) is an alternative form of locoregional treatment (LRT) in this setting. We retrospectively studied the impact of LRT on the survival of breast cancer patients with synchronous metastases. Among 18,753 breast cancer patients treated in our institution between 1980 and 2004, 598 patients (3.2%) had synchronous metastasis at diagnosis. Demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The impact of LRT on overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis including known prognostic factors. Among 581 eligible patients, 320 received LRT (group A), and 261 received no LRT (group B). LRT consisted of exclusive LRR in 249 patients (78%), surgery of the primary tumor with adjuvant LRR in 41 patients (13%), and surgery alone in 30 patients (9%). With a median follow-up time of 39 months, the 3-year OS rates were 43.4% and 26.7% in group A and group B (P =.00002), respectively. The association between LRT and improved survival was particularly marked in women with visceral metastases. LRT was an independent prognostic factor in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.70; 95% CI, 0.58 to 0.85; P = .0002). The adjusted HR for late death (>or= 1 year) was 0.76 (95% CI, 0.61 to 0.96; P = .02). In our experience, LRT, consisting mainly of exclusive LRR, was associated with improved survival in breast cancer patients with synchronous metastases. Exclusive LRR may thus represent an active alternative to surgery.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 03/2009; 27(9):1375-81. · 18.04 Impact Factor
  • Cancer Radiotherapie - CANCER RADIOTHER. 01/2009; 13(6):638-638.
  • Cancer Radiotherapie - CANCER RADIOTHER. 01/2008; 12(6):707-707.
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    ABSTRACT: Sans rsum
    Oncologie 01/2006; 8(3):282-284. · 0.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We assessed the relationships between soluble interleukin-2 receptor (R-IL2s) circulating concentrations and the clinicobiological characteristics of 80 breast cancer patients treated by radiotherapy. We did not evidenced significant relationships between R-IL2s concentrations before radiotherapy and patient's or tumours characteristics. However, R-IL2s concentrations were found to be positively correlated to lymphocyte levels and cumulated radiations dose during radiotherapy. Radiotherapy-induced lymphocyte lysis increases R-IL2s concentration among patients having a normal lymphocyte level (>1,4 G/L) (P=0.01). In recurrent breast cancer, median R-IL2s concentrations were significantly elevated when compared to recurrence–free patients: median 41,5 pM/l (range: 15,6–146.0 pM/l) for metastatic patients and 53,1 pM/l (range: 36.0–70,2 pM/l) in case of contralateral cancer versus 36,6 pM/l (range: 1–169,6 pM/l) without any event (P=0.0002). In our series of breast cancers, mainly composed of stage I and II tumours, we found no prognostic value of initial R-IL2s concentration with regard to first recurrence.
    Immuno-analyse & Biologie Specialisee - IMMUNO-ANAL BIOL SPEC. 01/2005; 20(5):308-314.
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    ABSTRACT: Up to 80% of breast cancer patients developing metastases have high levels of CA 15.3. We studied the prognostic implications of CA 15.3 kinetics in 119 patients before and at first metastasis by univariate and multivariate statistics. At first metastasis, CA 15.3 was elevated in 82.4% of patients, with a lead time (median 162 days) in 42.0% of them. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed overall survival (median 1477 days) to be significantly related to estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) status (p=0.0001) and tumor size (p=0.025). The interval between diagnosis and first abnormal CA 15.3 (p=0.0001), the CA 15.3 concentration (p=0.013), and the presence or absence of a lead time (p=0.001) also had prognostic value. ER and PgR status (p=0.0005 and p=0.0103, respectively), metastasis-free interval (p=0.0003), existence of a CA 15.3 lead time (p=0.0028), and days from diagnosis to first abnormal CA 15.3 (p=0.0055) entered in the Cox model. After first metastasis (median survival 573 days), ER and PgR status (p=0.0001 and p=0.0004, respectively), existence of a lead time for CA 15.3 (p=0.0138), and the concentration of first abnormal CA 15.3 (p=0.0145) had individual prognostic value. In the Cox model ER status (p=0.0001), nodal status (p=0.0191), existence of a lead time for CA 15.3 (p=0.0033), days from diagnosis to first abnormal CA 15.3 (p=0.0132), and concentration of first abnormal CA 15.3 (p=0.0320) were found to be independent prognostic variables. Compared to a matched historical control group that was not monitored by CA 15.3 assaying (n=140), the study group had a significantly longer survival after the first metastasis (p=0.0005). In conclusion, the kinetics of CA 15.3 before the first metastasis is of prognostic value. When associated with 18-fluorodeoxyglucose imaging, serial CA 15.3 assays may help to implement early treatment of metastases.
    The International journal of biological markers 01/2002; 17(4):231-8. · 1.59 Impact Factor