Yi-Ling Lin

Chung Shan Medical University, 臺中市, Taiwan, Taiwan

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Publications (10)33.42 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Chronic alcohol consumption leads to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Naturally fermented noni juice (NJ) contains polyphenols, polysaccharides, and some trace minerals. This study was to explore protective effects of NJ against chronic alcohol consumption. Mice were assigned randomly to one of the following groups: (1) Control: control liquid diet and distilled water; (2) Alcohol: alcohol liquid diet and distilled water; (3) Alc+NJ_1X: alcohol liquid diet and 5 mL NJ/kg BW; (4) Alc+NJ_2X: alcohol liquid diet and 10 mL NJ/kg BW; (5) Alc+NJ_3X: alcohol and 15 mL NJ/kg BW for 4 weeks. NJ decreased (p<0.05) serum AST, ALT, and alcohol levels and liver lipids, as well as increased (p<0.05) daily fecal lipid outputs in alcohol-diet fed mice. NJ supplementation not only downregulated (p<0.05) lipogenesis but also upregulated (p<0.05) fatty-acid β-oxidation in livers of alcohol-diet fed mice. NJ also accelerated alcohol clearance via increased (p<0.05) hepatic ADH and ALDH activities. NJ increased (p<0.05) hepatic TEAC and GSH levels but decreased (p<0.05) TBARS value, and TLR2/4, P38, ERK 1/2, NFκB P65, iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, and IL-1β expressions in alcohol-diet fed mice. NJ promotes hepatoprotection against alcohol-induced injury due to regulations of lipid homeostasis, antioxidant status, alcohol metabolism, and antiinflammatory responses.
    Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 10/2013; 61(46). DOI:10.1021/jf4038419 · 3.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Polyphenols in noni juice (NJ) are mainly composed of phenolic acids, mainly gentisic, p-hydroxybenoic, and chlorogenic acids. To investigate the beneficial effects of NJ on the liver, hamsters were fed with two diets, normal-fat and high-fat diets. Furthermore, high-fat dietary hamsters were received distilled water, and 3, 6, and 9mL NJ/kg BW, respectively. After a 6-week feeding period, the increased (p<0.05) sizes of liver and visceral fat in high-fat dietary hamsters compared to the control hamsters were ameliorated (p<0.05) by NJ supplementation. NJ also decreased (p<0.05) serum/liver lipids but enhanced (p<0.05) daily faecal lipid/bile acid outputs in the high-fat dietary hamsters. High-fat dietary hamsters supplemented with NJ had higher (p<0.05) liver antioxidant capacities but lowered (p<0.05) liver iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, and IL-1β expressions, gelatinolytic levels of MMP9, and serum ALT values compared to those without NJ. Hence, NJ protects liver against a high-fat dietary habit via regulations of antioxidative and anti-inflammatory responses.
    Food Chemistry 09/2013; 140(1-2):31-8. DOI:10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.02.035 · 3.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Litchi flower-water extract (LFWE) contains plenty of phenolic acids, flavonoids, condensed tannins, anthocyanins, and proanthocyanidins. In this study, we used eight male rats per group that were assigned randomly to one of the following dietary group: (1) normal-caloric diet and distilled water; (2) hypercaloric diet (HCD) and distilled water; (3) HCD and 2.5% LFWE; (4) HCD and 5% LFWE for 10 weeks. As results, LFWEs demonstrated a suppressive (p < 0.05) effect on in vitro lipase activities; meanwhile, larger sizes of livers, perirenal and epididymal adipose tissues, and cell sizes of epididymal adipose tissues in hypercaloric-diet-fed group were decreased (p < 0.05) by drinking LFWEs, especially in 5% LFWE-treated groups. Increased (p < 0.05) serum cholesterol and liver lipid levels were measured in hypercaloric-diet-fed rats. However, drinking LFWEs also decreased (p < 0.05) those levels to that similar to the NCD group, whereas drinking LFWEs resulted in higher (p < 0.05) faecal lipid concentrations. It also corresponded to the liver TNF-α and IL-1β values which were ameliorated (p < 0.05) in hypercaloric-diet-fed rats with LFWEs. Therefore, the result of this investigation match the anticipation, which LFWE indeed possesses a potential nutraceuticals for anti-obesity effects.
    Journal of Functional Foods 04/2013; 5(2):923-929. DOI:10.1016/j.jff.2013.02.002 · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gentisic acid and epicatechin are two major compounds in phenolic acids and flavonoids of litchi-flower-water extracts (LFWEs), respectively. Increased (p < 0.05) serum lipids and liver size/lipid, damage/inflammatory indices, TBARS value, CRP level, MMP-9 activity, and decreased (p < 0.05) liver GSH and TEAC levels, and SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activities were observed in high-fat-diet fed hamsters compared to normal-fat-dietary hamsters. Those biochemical values of high-fat-diet fed hamsters were significant improved (p < 0.05) by drinking LFWEs. In addition, these improvements on liver damage induced by a high-fat diet were also evidenced in the histopathological examination of livers where less microvesicular steatosis and no necrotic/inflammatory cells were observed in high-fat-diet fed hamster drinking LFWEs. Therefore, protective effects of LFWEs on liver damage of high-fat-diet fed hamsters can be accounted for antioxidative properties and anti-inflammatory effects of LFWEs.
    Journal of Functional Foods 01/2013; 5(1):44–52. DOI:10.1016/j.jff.2012.08.002 · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effects of taurine (Tau) in regulation of lipid metabolism and decreasing inflammation in chronic alcohol-fed rats was investigated. Rats were randomly divided into three groups: (1) isocaloric solution; (2) 3 g alcohol/kg BW/day; (3) 3 g alcohol/kg BW/day + 1 g Tau/kg BW/day for 6 weeks. Liver size and serum/liver lipids of alcohol-fed rats were decreased (p < 0.05) by Tau supplementation, but daily fecal lipid/bile acid outputs were increased (p < 0.05). Regarding de novo lipogenesis, Tau downregulated (p < 0.05) fatty-acid biosynthesis and upregulated (p < 0.05) cholesterol metabolism (CYP7A1) and energy expenditure (PPAR-α). Serum AST and ALT, and hepatic TNF-α levels and MMP-9 activity of alcohol-fed rats were decreased (p < 0.05) by Tau supplementation which may be related to the maintenance of higher (p < 0.05) antioxidant levels (lower thiobarbituric-acid-reactive-substances values and higher trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity) in serum and livers. Our study indicates that Tau downregulates lipogenesis, oxidative stress, and inflammation in chronic alcohol-fed rats.
    Food Chemistry 11/2012; 135(1):24–30. DOI:10.1016/j.foodchem.2012.04.036 · 3.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Eur J Clin Invest 2012; 42 (12): 1309–1316 Background Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor that inhibits angiogenesis and carcinogenesis, has been used for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. However, sporadic cases have been reported with the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) after sorafenib treatment, mostly in those with cirrhosis. Liver function impairment, portal-systemic collaterals and brain oxidative stress participate in the pathogenesis of HE. The study therefore aimed to investigate the potential influences of sorafenib on HE and the relevant risk factors in cirrhotic rats. Methods Liver cirrhosis was induced in Spraque-Dawley rats with common bile duct ligation (CBDL). CBDL rats received sorafenib 1 mg/kg/day or distilled water (DW) via oral gavage since the 15th day post surgery for 2 weeks. On the 28th day, after motor activities measurements, mean arterial pressure, portal pressure and heart rate were checked. Thereafter, cerebral cortex and cerebellum were dissected for oxidative stress study and blood was collected for liver biochemistry survey. Results Sorafenib significantly reduced portal pressure (22%) and collateral shunting degree (15%) in cirrhotic rats. Alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, total bilirubin and ammonia were similar in sorafenib- and DW-treated groups. Motor activities were not significantly altered by sorafenib. In cerebrum, the oxidant and antioxidant substances activities were not significantly different between the two groups, whereas they were divergent in cerebellum and hippocampus. Conclusion By surveying three main aspects involved in the pathogenesis of HE, this study demonstrates that sorafenib does not increase the risk of HE in cirrhotic rats.
    European Journal of Clinical Investigation 10/2012; 42(12). DOI:10.1111/eci.12006 · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Noni juice (NJ) is rich in phytochemicals and polysaccharides. Lipid-lowering and antioxidative effects of NJ were investigated in this study. Fifty male hamsters were assigned randomly to one of the following groups: (1) normal diet and distilled water (LFCD); (2) high-fat/cholesterol diet and distilled water (HFCD); (3) HFCD and 3 ml NJ (including 0.20 g solids)/kg BW (NJ_L); (4) HFCD and 6 mL NJ (including 0.40 g solids)/kg BW (NJ_M); (5) HFCD and 9 ml NJ (including 0.60 g solids)/kg BW (NJ_H) for six weeks. NJ supplementation decreased (p < 0.05) serum triacylglycerol, cholesterol, atherogenic index, malondialdehyde levels, and hepatic lipids in HFCD hamsters, whereas serum trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, glutathione, and fecal lipids in HFCD hamsters were increased (p < 0.05) by NJ supplementation. Although NJ supplementation downregulated (p < 0.05) sterol regulator element binding protein-1c in HFCD hamsters, it upregulated (p < 0.05) hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha and uncoupling protein 2 gene expressions in HFCD hamsters. Results demonstrate that NJ promotes cardioprotection in a high-fat/cholesterol diet.
    Plant Foods for Human Nutrition 09/2012; 67(3):294-302. DOI:10.1007/s11130-012-0309-x · 2.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is also called hepatic steatosis and has become an emergent liver disease in developed and developing nations. This study was to exam the preventive effects of taurine (Tau) on the development of hepatic steatosis via a hamster model. Although hepatic steatosis of hamsters was induced by feeding a high-fat/cholesterol diet, drinking water containing 0.35 and 0.7% Tau improved (p < 0.05) the serum lipid profile. Meanwhile, the smaller (p < 0.05) liver sizes and lower (p < 0.05) hepatic lipids in high-fat/cholesterol dietary hamsters drinking Tau may be partially due to higher (p < 0.05) fecal cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and bile acid outputs. In the regulation of lipid homeostasis, drinking a Tau solution upregulated (p < 0.05) low-density lipoprotein receptor and CYP7A1 gene expressions in high-fat/cholesterol dietary hamsters, which result in increased fecal cholesterol and bile acid outputs. Drinking a Tau solution also upregulated (p < 0.05) peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) and uncoupling protein 2 (UPC2) gene expressions in high-fat/cholesterol dietary hamsters, thus increasing energy expenditure. Besides, Tau also enhanced (p < 0.05) liver antioxidant capacities (GSH, TEAC, SOD, and CAT) and decreased (p < 0.05) lipid peroxidation (MDA), which alleviated liver damage in the high-fat/cholesterol dietary hamsters. Therefore, Tau shows preventive effects on the development of hepatic steatosis induced by a high-fat/cholesterol dietary habit.
    Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 01/2011; 59(1):450-7. DOI:10.1021/jf103167u · 3.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An alcoholic fatty liver disease was induced by drinking water containing 20% (w/w) alcohol. Therapeutic groups were orally administrated dosages of 0.25 g silymarin/kg body weight (BW) and a low dosage of Niuchangchih (Antrodia camphorata) (0.025 g/kg BW) and a high dosage of Niuchangchih (0.1 g/kg BW) per day. Niuchangchih, especially at the high dosage, not only showed a hypercholesterolemic effect (p < 0.05) but also reduced (p < 0.05) hepatic lipids in alcohol-fed rats. Those beneficial effects could be partially attributed to higher (p < 0.05) fecal cholesterol and bile acid outputs, as well as downregulations (p < 0.05) of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, and malic enzyme gene expressions; meanwhile, there was an upregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated alpha gene expression. Besides, Niuchangchih also enhanced (p < 0.05) the liver glutathione, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase and decreased the liver malondialdehyde content, which also partially contributed to the lowered (p < 0.05) serum aspartate aminotransferase levels and no observed lesion in the histological examination of alcohol-fed rats.
    Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 03/2010; 58(6):3859-66. DOI:10.1021/jf100530c · 3.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Plenty of polyphenols, i.e. phenolic acids and flavonoids, were found in longan flower water extract (LFWE) through spectrophotometric and HPLC analyses. Antiobesity and hypolipidemic effects of polyphenol-rich longan flower water extract (LFWE) were investigated in this study. Eight male rats per group were assigned randomly to one of the following dietary groups: (1) normal-caloric diet and pure water (NCD + NDW); (2) hypercaloric diet and pure water (HCD + NDW); (3) HCD and 1.25% (w/v) LFWE (HCD + 1.25% LFWE); (4) HCD and 2.5% (w/v) LFWE (HCD + 2.5% LFWE) for 9 weeks. Body weight, size of epididymal fat, serum triglyceride level and atherogenic index, and hepatic lipids were decreased (p < 0.05) in HCD rats by drinking 2.5% LFWE which may result from downregulated (p < 0.05) pancreatic lipase activity, and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) gene expressions, as well as upregulated (p < 0.05) LDL receptor (LDLR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated-receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) gene expressions, and also increased (p < 0.05) fecal triglyceride excretions. Therefore, polyphenol-rich LFWE indeed characterizes antiobesity and hypolipidemic effects in vivo.
    Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 02/2010; 58(3):2020-7. DOI:10.1021/jf903355q · 3.11 Impact Factor