Kevin P Battaile

University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, United States

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Publications (53)294.77 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Serpin-2 (SRPN2) is a key negative regulator of the melanization response in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. SRPN2 irreversibly inhibits CLIPB9, which functions in a serine proteinase cascade culminating in the activation of pro-phenoloxidase (proPO) and melanization. Silencing of SRPN2 in An. gambiae results in spontaneous melanization and decreased lifespan and is therefore a promising target for vector control. The previously determined structure of SRPN2 revealed a partial insertion of the hinge region of the reactive center loop (RCL) into β sheet A. This partial hinge insertion participates in heparin-linked activation in other serpins, notably antithrombin III. SRPN2 does not contain a heparin binding site and any possible mechanistic function of the hinge insertion was previously unknown. To investigate the function of the SRPN2 hinge insertion, we developed three SRPN2 variants in which the hinge regions are either constitutively expelled or inserted and analyzed their structure, thermostability, and inhibitory activity. We determined that constitutive hinge expulsion resulted in a 2.7-fold increase in the rate of CLIPB9Xa inhibition, which is significantly lower than previous observations of allosteric serpin activation. Furthermore, we determined that stable insertion of the hinge region did not appreciably decrease the accessibility of the RCL to CLIPB9. Together, these results indicate the partial hinge insertion in SRPN2 does not participate in the allosteric activation observed in other serpins and instead represents a molecular trade-off between RCL accessibility and efficient formation of an inhibitory complex with the cognate proteinase.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 12/2014; · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cell division in Chlamydiae is poorly understood as apparent homologs to most conserved bacterial cell division proteins are lacking and presence of elongation (rod shape) associated proteins indicate non-canonical mechanisms may be employed. The rod-shape determining protein MreB has been proposed as playing a unique role in chlamydial cell division. In other organisms, MreB is part of an elongation complex that requires RodZ for proper function. A recent study reported that the protein encoded by ORF CT009 interacts with MreB despite low sequence similarity to RodZ. The studies herein expand on those observations through protein structure, mutagenesis, and cellular localization analyses. Structural analysis indicated that CT009 shares high level of structural similarity to RodZ, revealing the conserved orientation of two residues critical for MreB interaction. Substitutions eliminated MreB protein interaction and partial complementation provided by CT009 in RodZ deficient E. coli. Cellular localization analysis of CT009 showed uniform membrane staining in Chlamydia. This was in contrast to the localization of MreB, which was restricted to predicted septal planes. MreB localization to septal planes provides direct experimental observation for the role of MreB in cell division and supports the hypothesis that it serves as a functional replacement for FtsZ in Chlamydia.
    Molecular Microbiology 11/2014; · 5.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis is the etiological agent of blinding trachoma and sexually transmitted disease. Genomic sequencing of Chlamydia indicated this medically important bacterium was not exclusively dependent on the host cell for energy. In order for the electron transport chain to function, electron shuttling between membrane embedded complexes requires lipid-soluble quinones (e.g. menaquionone or ubiquinone). The sources or biosynthetic pathways required to obtain these electron carriers within C. trachomatis are poorly understood. The 1.6 Å crystal structure of C. trachomatis hypothetical protein CT263 presented here supports a role in quinone biosynthesis. Although CT263 lacks sequence-based functional annotation, the crystal structure of CT263 displays striking structural similarity to 5'-methylthioadenosine nucleosidase (MTAN) enzymes. While CT263 lacks the active site-associated dimer interface found in prototypical MTANs, co-crystal structures with product (adenine) or substrate (5'-methylthioadenosine) indicate that canonical active site residues are conserved. Enzymatic characterization of CT263 indicates that the futalosine pathway intermediate, 6-amino-6-deoxyfutalosine (kcat/Km = 1.8 × 10(3) M-1 s-1) but not prototypical MTAN substrates (e.g. S-adenosylhomocysteine and 5'-methylthioadenosine), are hydrolyzed. Bioinformatic analyses of the chlamydial proteome also support the futalosine pathway towards the synthesis of menaquinone in Chlamydiaceae. This report provides the first experimental support for quinone synthesis in Chlamydia. Menaquinone synthesis provides another target for agents to combat C. trachomatis infection.
    The Journal of biological chemistry. 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Experiments and modeling are described to perform spectral fitting of multi-threshold counting measurements on a pixel-array detector. An analytical model was developed for describing the probability density function of detected voltage in X-ray photon-counting arrays, utilizing fractional photon counting to account for edge/corner effects from voltage plumes that spread across multiple pixels. Each pixel was mathematically calibrated by fitting the detected voltage distributions to the model at both 13.5 keV and 15.0 keV X-ray energies. The model and established pixel responses were then exploited to statistically recover images of X-ray intensity as a function of X-ray energy in a simulated multi-wavelength and multi-counting threshold experiment.
    Journal of Synchrotron Radiation 09/2014; 21(Pt 5):1180-1187. · 2.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family represents a new class of therapeutic targets with diverse potential disease indications. PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitors have been developed for breast and ovarian tumors manifesting double-stranded DNA-repair defects, whereas tankyrase 1 and 2 (TNKS1 and TNKS2, also known as PARP5a and PARP5b, respectively) inhibitors have been developed for tumors with elevated -catenin activity. As the clinical relevance of PARP inhibitors continues to be actively explored, there is heightened interest in the design of selective inhibitors based on the detailed structural features of how small-molecule inhibitors bind to each of the PARP family members. Here, the high-resolution crystal structures of the human TNKS2 PARP domain in complex with 16 various PARP inhibitors are reported, including the compounds BSI-201, AZD-2281 and ABT-888, which are currently in Phase 2 or 3 clinical trials. These structures provide insight into the inhibitor-binding modes for the tankyrase PARP domain and valuable information to guide the rational design of future tankyrase-specific inhibitors.
    Acta Crystallographica Section D Biological Crystallography 09/2014; 4:2-34. · 14.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cyclophilin D (CypD) is a key mitochondrial target for amyloid-β-induced mitochondrial and synaptic dysfunction and is considered a potential drug target for Alzheimer's disease. The high-resolution crystal structures of primitive orthorhombic (CypD-o) and primitive tetragonal (CypD-t) forms have been determined to 1.45 and 0.85 Å resolution, respectively, and are nearly identical structurally. Although an isomorphous structure of CypD-t has previously been reported, the structure reported here was determined at atomic resolution, while CypD-o represents a new crystal form for this protein. In addition, each crystal form contains a PEG 400 molecule bound to the same region along with a second PEG 400 site in CypD-t which occupies the cyclosporine A inhibitor binding site of CypD. Highly precise structural information for CypD should be extremely useful for discerning the detailed interaction of small molecules, particularly drugs and/or inhibitors, bound to CypD. The 0.85 Å resolution structure of CypD-t is the highest to date for any CypD structure.
    Acta Crystallographica Section F Structural Biology and Crystallization Communications 06/2014; 70(Pt 6):717-722. · 0.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The 26S proteasome is a 2.5 MDa protease dedicated to the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this complex containing 66 polypeptides is assisted by at least nine proteasome-specific chaperones. One of these, Nas2, binds to the proteasomal AAA-ATPase subunit Rpt5. The PDZ domain of Nas2 binds to the C-terminal tail of Rpt5; however, it does not require the C-terminus of Rpt5 for binding. Here, the 1.15 Å resolution structure of the PDZ domain of Nas2 is reported. This structure will provide a basis for further insights regarding the structure and function of Nas2 in proteasome assembly.
    Acta crystallographica. Section F, Structural biology communications. 04/2014; 70(Pt 4):418-23.
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    ABSTRACT: The ubiquitous non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 (encoded by PTPN11) plays a key role in RAS/ERK signaling downstream of most, if not all growth factors, cytokines and integrins, although its major substrates remain controversial. Mutations in PTPN11 lead to several distinct human diseases. Germ-line PTPN11 mutations cause about 50% of Noonan Syndrome (NS), which is among the most common autosomal dominant disorders. LEOPARD Syndrome (LS) is an acronym for its major syndromic manifestations: multiple Lentigines, Electrocardiographic abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonary stenosis, Abnormalities of genitalia, Retardation of growth, and sensorineural Deafness. Frequently, LS patients have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and they might also have an increased risk of neuroblastoma (NS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Consistent with the distinct pathogenesis of NS and LS, different types of PTPN11 mutations cause these disorders. Although multiple studies have reported the biochemical and biological consequences of NS- and LS-associated PTPN11 mutations, their structural consequences have not been analyzed fully. Here we report the crystal structures of WT SHP2 and five NS/LS-associated SHP2 mutants. These findings enable direct structural comparisons of the local conformational changes caused by each mutation. Our structural analysis agrees with, and provides additional mechanistic insight into, the previously reported catalytic properties of these mutants. The results of our research provide new information regarding the structure-function relationship of this medically important target, and should serve as a solid foundation for structure-based drug discovery programs.
    BMC Structural Biology 03/2014; 14(1):10. · 2.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hemophores from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (HasAp), Serratia marcescens (HasAsm), and Yersinia pestis (HasAyp) bind hemin between two loops. One of the loops harbors conserved axial ligand Ty75 (Y75 loop) in all three structures, whereas the second loop (H32 loop) contains axial ligand His32 in HasAp and HasAsm, but a non-coordinating Gln32 in HasAyp. Hemin binding to the Y75 loop of HasAp or HasAsm causes a large rearrangement of the H32 loop that enables His32 coordination. The Q32 loop in apo-HasAyp is already in the closed conformation, such that hemin binding to the conserved Y75 loop occurs with minimal structural rearrangement and without coordinative interaction with the Q32 loop. In this study, structural and spectroscopic investigations of the hemophore HasAp were conducted to probe (i) the role of the conserved Tyr75 loop in hemin binding, and (ii) the proposed requirement of the His83-Tyr75 hydrogen bond to enable hemin coordination by Tyr75. High-resolution crystal structures of H83A holo-HasAp obtained at pH 6.5 (0.89 Å) and 5.4 (1.25 Å) show that Tyr75 remains coordinated to the heme iron, and that a water molecule can substitute for His83 Nδ to interact with the Oη atom of Tyr75, likely stabilizing the Tyr75-Fe interaction. NMR spectroscopy revealed that in apo-Y75A and H83A HasAp, the Y75 loop is disordered, and that disorder propagates to nearby elements of secondary structure, suggesting that the His83 Nδ to Tyr75 Oη interaction is important to the organization of the Y75 loop in apo-HasA. Kinetic analysis of hemin loading carried out with stopped flow UV-vis and rapid-freeze-quench resonance Raman show that both mutants load hemin with biphasic kinetic parameters that are not significantly dissimilar from those previously observed with wild type HasAp. When the structural and kinetic data are taken together a tentative model emerges, which suggests that HasA hemophores utilize hydrophobic, π-π stacking, and van der Waals interactions to load hemin efficiently, while axial ligation likely functions to slow hemin release, thus enabling the hemophore to meet the challenge of capturing hemin under inhospitable conditions and deliver it selectively to its cognate receptor.
    Biochemistry 03/2014; · 3.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is an 83 kDa protein that is one of three protein components of the anthrax toxin, an AB toxin secreted by Bacillus anthracis. PA is capable of undergoing several structural changes, including oligomerization to either a heptameric or octameric structure called the prepore, and at acidic pH a major conformational change to form a membrane-spanning pore. To follow these structural changes at a residue-specific level, we have conducted initial studies in which we have biosynthetically incorporated 5-fluorotryptophan (5-FTrp) into PA, and we have studied the influence of 5-FTrp labeling on the structural stability of PA and on binding to the host receptor capillary morphogenesis protein 2 (CMG2) using 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). There are seven tryptophans in PA, but of the four domains in PA, only two contain tryptophans: domain 1 (Trp65, -90, -136, -206, and -226) and domain 2 (Trp346 and -477). Trp346 is of particular interest because of its proximity to the CMG2 binding interface, and because it forms part of the membrane-spanning pore. We show that the 19F resonance of Trp346 is sensitive to changes in pH, consistent with crystallographic studies, and that receptor binding significantly stabilizes Trp346 to both pH and temperature. In addition, we provide evidence that suggests that resonances from tryptophans distant from the binding interface are also stabilized by the receptor. Our studies highlight the positive impact of receptor binding on protein stability and the use of 19F NMR in gaining insight into structural changes in a high-molecular weight protein.
    Biochemistry 01/2014; 53(4):690–701. · 3.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Asymmetric diadenosine 5',5'"-P1,P4-tetraphosphate (Ap4A) hydrolases are members of the Nudix superfamily that asymmetrically cleave the metabolite Ap4A into ATP and AMP while facilitating homeostasis. The obligate intracellular mammalian pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis possesses a single Nudix family protein, CT771. As pathogens that rely on a host for replication and dissemination typically have one or zero Nudix family proteins, this suggests that CT771 could be critical for chlamydial biology and pathogenesis. We identified orthologs to CT771 within environmental Chlamydiales that share active site residues suggesting a common function. Crystal structures of both apo- and ligand-bound CT771 were determined to 2.6 Å and 1.9 Å resolution, respectively. The structure of CT771 shows a αβα-sandwich motif with many conserved elements lining the putative Nudix active site. Numerous aspects of the ligand-bound CT771 structure mirror those observed in the ligand-bound structure of the Ap4A hydrolase from Caenorhabditis elegans. These structures represent only the second Ap4A hydrolase enzyme member determined from eubacteria and suggest that mammalian and bacterial Ap4A hydrolases might be more similar than previously thought. The aforementioned structural similarities, in tandem with molecular docking, guided the enzymatic characterization of CT771. Together, these studies provide the molecular details for substrate binding and specificity, supporting the analysis that CT771 is an Ap4A hydrolase (nudH).
    Biochemistry 12/2013; · 3.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The ability to selectively activate function of particular proteins via pharmacological agents is a longstanding goal in chemical biology. Recently, we reported an approach for designing a de novo allosteric effector site directly into the catalytic domain of an enzyme. This approach is distinct from traditional chemical rescue of enzymes in that it relies on disruption and restoration of structure, rather than active site chemistry, as a means to achieve modulate function. However, rationally identifying analogous de novo binding sites in other enzymes represents a key challenge for extending this approach to introduce allosteric control into other enzymes. Here we show that mutation sites leading to protein inactivation via tryptophan-to-glycine substitution and allowing (partial) reactivation by the subsequent addition of indole are remarkably frequent. Through a suite of methods including a cell-based reporter assay, computational structure prediction and energetic analysis, fluorescence studies, enzymology, pulse proteolysis, X-ray crystallography, and hydrogen-deuterium mass spectrometry, we find that these switchable proteins are most commonly modulated indirectly, through control of protein stability. Addition of indole in these cases rescues activity not by reverting a discrete conformational change, as we had observed in the sole previously reported example, but rather rescues activity by restoring protein stability. This important finding will dramatically impact the design of future switches and sensors built by this approach, since evaluating stability differences associated with cavity-forming mutations is a far more tractable task than predicting allosteric conformational changes. By analogy to natural signaling systems, the insights from this study further raise the exciting prospect of modulating stability to design optimal recognition properties into future de novo switches and sensors built through chemical rescue of structure.
    Journal of the American Chemical Society 12/2013; · 10.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chlamydia trachomatis is a major cause of various diseases, including blinding trachoma and pelvic inflammatory disease, and is the leading reported sexually transmitted bacterial infection worldwide. All pathogenic Chlamydiae spp. utilize a supramolecular syringe, or type III secretion system (T3SS), to inject proteins into their obligate host in order to propagate infection. Here, the structure of CT584, a T3SS-associated protein, that has been refined to a resolution of 3.05 Å is reported. The CT584 structure is a hexamer comprised of a trimer of dimers. The structure shares a high degree of similarity to the recently reported structure of an orthologous protein, Cpn0803, from Chlamydia pneumoniae, which highlights the highly conserved nature of this protein across these chlamydial species, despite different tissue tropism and disease pathology.
    Acta Crystallographica Section F Structural Biology and Crystallization Communications 11/2013; 69(Pt 11):1196-201. · 0.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The proteasomal ATPase ring, comprising Rpt1-Rpt6, associates with the heptameric α-ring of the proteasome core particle (CP) in the mature proteasome, with the Rpt carboxy-terminal tails inserting into pockets of the α-ring. Rpt ring assembly is mediated by four chaperones, each binding a distinct Rpt subunit. Here we report that the base subassembly of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteasome, which includes the Rpt ring, forms a high-affinity complex with the CP. This complex is subject to active dissociation by the chaperones Hsm3, Nas6 and Rpn14. Chaperone-mediated dissociation was abrogated by a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue, indicating that chaperone action is coupled to nucleotide hydrolysis by the Rpt ring. Unexpectedly, synthetic Rpt tail peptides bound α-pockets with poor specificity, except for Rpt6, which uniquely bound the α2/α3-pocket. Although the Rpt6 tail is not visualized within an α-pocket in mature proteasomes, it inserts into the α2/α3-pocket in the base-CP complex and is important for complex formation. Thus, the Rpt-CP interface is reconfigured when the lid complex joins the nascent proteasome to form the mature holoenzyme.
    Nature 05/2013; · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The potential of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for automated crystal centering to guide synchrotron X-ray diffraction of protein crystals was explored. These studies included (i) comparison of microcrystal positions in cryoloops as determined by SHG imaging and by X-ray diffraction rastering and (ii) X-ray structure determinations of selected proteins to investigate the potential for laser-induced damage from SHG imaging. In studies using β2 adrenergic receptor membrane-protein crystals prepared in lipidic mesophase, the crystal locations identified by SHG images obtained in transmission mode were found to correlate well with the crystal locations identified by raster scanning using an X-ray minibeam. SHG imaging was found to provide about 2 µm spatial resolution and shorter image-acquisition times. The general insensitivity of SHG images to optical scatter enabled the reliable identification of microcrystals within opaque cryocooled lipidic mesophases that were not identified by conventional bright-field imaging. The potential impact of extended exposure of protein crystals to five times a typical imaging dose from an ultrafast laser source was also assessed. Measurements of myoglobin and thaumatin crystals resulted in no statistically significant differences between structures obtained from diffraction data acquired from exposed and unexposed regions of single crystals. Practical constraints for integrating SHG imaging into an active beamline for routine automated crystal centering are discussed.
    Acta Crystallographica Section D Biological Crystallography 05/2013; 69(Pt 5):843-51. · 12.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The human pathogen Yersinia pestis requires the assembly of the type III secretion system (T3SS) for virulence. The structural component of the T3SS contains an external needle and a tip complex, which is formed by LcrV in Y. pestis. The structure of an LcrV triple mutant (K40A/D41A/K42A) in a C273S background has previously been reported to 2.2 Å resolution. Here, the crystal structure of LcrV without the triple mutation in a C273S background is reported at a higher resolution of 1.65 Å. Overall the two structures are similar, but there are also notable differences, particularly near the site of the triple mutation. The refined structure revealed a slight shift in the backbone positions of residues Gly28-Asn43 and displayed electron density in the loop region consisting of residues Ile46-Val63, which was disordered in the original structure. In addition, the helical turn region spanning residues Tyr77-Gln95 adopts a different orientation.
    Acta Crystallographica Section F Structural Biology and Crystallization Communications 05/2013; 69(Pt 5):477-81. · 0.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hemophores from Serratia marcescens (HasAsm) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (HasAp) bind hemin between two loops, which harbor the axial ligands H32 and Y75. Hemin binding to the Y75 loop triggers closing of the H32 loop and enables binding of H32. Because Yersinia pestis HasA (HasAyp) presents a Gln at position 32, we determined the structures of apo- and holo-HasAyp. Surprisingly, the Q32 loop in apo-HasAyp is already in the closed conformation, but no residue from the Q32 loop binds hemin in holo-HasAyp. In agreement with the minimal reorganization between the apo- and holo-structures, the hemin on-rate is too fast to detect by conventional stopped-flow measurements.
    Biochemistry 04/2013; · 3.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tail Assembly Chaperones (TACs) are a family of proteins likely required for the morphogenesis of all long-tailed phages. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of gp13, the TAC of phage HK97. This structure is similar that of the TAC from the Lactococcus phage p2, and two unannotated structures of likely TACs encoded in prophage-derived regions of B. subtilis and B. stearothermophilus. Despite the high sequence divergence of these proteins, gp13 forms a ring structure with similar dimensions to the spirals observed in the crystal lattices of these other proteins. Remarkably, these similar quaternary structures are formed through very different interprotomer interactions. We present functional data supporting the biological relevance of these spiral structures, and propose that spiral formation has been the primary requirement for these proteins during evolution. This study presents an unusual example of diverged protein sequences and oligomerization mechanisms in the presence of conserved quaternary structure.
    Journal of Molecular Biology 03/2013; · 3.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A conserved spi-ral structure for highly diverged phage Tail Assembly Chaperones, Journal of Molecular Biology (2013), doi:10.1016/j.jmb.2013.03.035 This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published in its final form. Please note that during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain.
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    ABSTRACT: A conserved spiral structure for highly diverged phage Tail Assembly Chaperones, Journal of Molecular Biology (2013), doi:10.1016/j.jmb.2013.03.035 This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of the resulting proof before it is published in its final form. Please note that during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain.
    Journal of Molecular Biology 03/2013; · 3.91 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

410 Citations
294.77 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010–2013
    • University of Kansas
      • • Department of Chemistry
      • • Ralph N. Adams Institute for Bioanalytical Chemistry
      Lawrence, KS, United States
    • Argonne National Laboratory
      Lemont, Illinois, United States
    • University Health Network
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2011–2012
    • The Princess Margaret Hospital
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2010–2012
    • Wichita State University
      • Department of Chemistry
      Wichita, KS, United States
  • 2002–2004
    • Medical College of Wisconsin
      • Department of Biochemistry
      Milwaukee, WI, United States