Huub van der Mijle

Hospital of Nij Smellinghe, Drachten, Friesland, Netherlands

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Publications (3)26.28 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Multifocal breast cancer is associated with a higher risk of nodal involvement compared to unifocal breast cancer and the drainage pattern from multifocal localisations may be different. For this reason, the value of the sentinel node biopsy (SNB) procedure for this indication is debated. The aim of the current analysis was to evaluate the sentinel node identification rate and nodal involvement in patients with a multifocal tumour in the EORTC 10981-22023 AMAROS trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From the first 4000 registered patients, 342 were identified with a multifocal tumour on histological examination and compared to a randomly selected control group of 684 patients with a unifocal tumour. The outcome of the SNB was assessed. RESULTS: The sentinel node was identified in 96% of the patients with a multifocal tumour and in 98% of those with unifocal disease. In the multifocal group, 51% had a metastasis in the sentinel node compared to 28% in the unifocal group; and further nodal involvement after a positive sentinel node was found in 40% (38/95) and 39% (39/101) respectively. CONCLUSION: In this prospective international multicentre study, the 96% detection rate indicates that the SNB procedure can be highly effective in patients with a multifocal tumour. Though the tumour-positive rate of the sentinel node was twice as high in the multifocal group compared to the unifocal group, further nodal involvement after a positive sentinel node was similar in both groups. This suggests that the SNB procedure is safe in patients with multifocal breast cancer.
    European journal of cancer (Oxford, England: 1990) 03/2013; · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The randomized EORTC 10981-22023 AMAROS trial investigates whether breast cancer patients with a tumor-positive sentinel node biopsy (SNB) are best treated with an axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) or axillary radiotherapy (ART). The aim of the current substudy was to evaluate the identification rate and the nodal involvement. The first 2,000 patients participating in the AMAROS trial were evaluated. Associations between the identification rate and technical, patient-, and tumor-related factors were evaluated. The outcome of the SNB procedure and potential further nodal involvement was assessed. In 65 patients, the sentinel node could not be identified. As a result, the sentinel node identification rate was 97% (1,888 of 1,953). Variables affecting the success rate were age, pathological tumor size, histology, year of accrual, and method of detection. The SNB results of 65% of the patients (n = 1,220) were negative and the patients underwent no further axillary treatment. The SNB results were positive in 34% of the patients (n = 647), including macrometastases (n = 409, 63%), micrometastases (n = 161, 25%), and isolated tumor cells (n = 77, 12%). Further nodal involvement in patients with macrometastases, micrometastases, and isolated tumor cells undergoing an ALND was 41, 18, and 18%, respectively. With a 97% detection rate in this prospective international multicenter study, the SNB procedure is highly effective, especially when the combined method is used. Further nodal involvement in patients with micrometastases and isolated tumor cells in the sentinel node was similar-both were 18%.
    Annals of Surgical Oncology 03/2010; 17(7):1854-61. · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE The After Mapping of the Axilla: Radiotherapy or Surgery? (AMAROS) phase III study compares axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) and axillary radiation therapy (ART) in early breast cancer patients with tumor-positive sentinel nodes. In the ART arm, the extent of nodal involvement remains unknown, which could have implications on the administration of adjuvant therapy. In this preliminary analysis, we studied the influence of random assignment to ALND or ART on the choice for adjuvant treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS In the first 2,000 patients enrolled in the AMAROS trial, we analyzed the administration of adjuvant systemic therapy. Multivariate analysis was used to assess variables affecting the administration of adjuvant chemotherapy. Adjuvant therapy was applied according to institutional guidelines. Results Of 2,000 patients, 566 patients had a positive sentinel node and were treated per random assignment. There was no significant difference in the administration of adjuvant systemic therapy. In the ALND and ART arms, 58% (175 of 300) and 61% (162 of 266) of the patients, respectively, received chemotherapy. Endocrine therapy was administered in 78% (235 of 300) of the patients in the ALND arm and in 76% (203 of 266) of the patients in the ART arm. Treatment arm was not a significant factor in the decision, and no interactions between treatment arm and other factors were observed. Multivariate analysis showed that age, tumor grade, multifocality, and size of the sentinel node metastasis significantly affected the administration of chemotherapy. Within the ALND arm, the extent of nodal involvement remained not significant in a sensitivity multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION Absence of knowledge regarding the extent of nodal involvement in the ART arm appears to have no major impact on the administration of adjuvant therapy.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 02/2010; 28(5):731-7. · 18.04 Impact Factor