Kenneth Resnicow

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States

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Publications (17)37.62 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Increasing moderate to vigorous physical activity among urban girls of low socioeconomic status is both a challenge and a public health priority. Physical activity interventions targeting exclusively girls remain limited, and maintenance of moderate to vigorous physical activity during the post-intervention period has been difficult to maintain. The main aim of the 5-year "Girls on the Move" group randomized trial is to evaluate the efficacy of a comprehensive school-based intervention in increasing girls' minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity and improving cardiovascular fitness, body mass index, and percent body fat immediately post-intervention (after 17 weeks) and at 9-month post-intervention follow-up (9 months after end of intervention). METHODS: A total of 24 urban middle schools in the Midwestern U.S. will be randomized to either receive the intervention or serve as a control (N = 1200 girls). The intervention, based on the Health Promotion Model and Self-Determination Theory, will include: (1) two face-to-face motivational, individually tailored counseling sessions with a registered nurse, one at the beginning and the other at the end of the intervention period; (2) an interactive Internet-based session during which each girl receives individually tailored motivational and feedback messages via iPad at 11 weeks (shortly after midpoint of intervention); and (3) a 90-minute after-school physical activity club. Racially diverse, low-active, 10- to 14-year-old 5th to 8th-grade girls will complete questionnaires and physical measures at baseline and post-intervention (n = 50 per school). Minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity will be assessed with accelerometers. Cardiovascular fitness will be assessed by estimating VO2 max with PACER (Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run) scores. Height and weight will be assessed to calculate body mass index. Percent body fat will be estimated with a foot-to-foot bioelectric impedance scale. Linear mixed effects regression analyses will be performed to assess intervention effects. DISCUSSION: This multi-component approach is expected to improve girls' moderate to vigorous physical activity and related physical outcomes.Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01503333.
    BMC Public Health 05/2013; 13(1):474. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In an effort to enhance the vividness and personal relevance of a text messaging intervention to promote weight loss among obese adolescents, a modified Photovoice process was evaluated with adolescents in a weight management program. Photovoice is a method using photography to generate relevant images and stories from users. Participants were recruited from the Michigan Pediatric Outpatient Weight Evaluation and Reduction (MPOWER) program, a multidisciplinary weight management program for obese adolescents and their parents. Twenty-three adolescents with a mean BMI of 40 were asked to take pictures on three to five randomly assigned weight-related topics, such as “something that reminds you to exercise,” and to text them to a research assistant. Adolescents then engaged in semistructured interviews about the experience. Detailed notes of the interviews were analyzed to identify themes. Participants generally provided high ratings of the process, indicating that (1) deciding what pictures to take caused them to reflect on their weight loss experience, and (2) a mobile intervention incorporating personally relevant images (e.g., basketball as their favorite sport rather than sports in general) would increase treatment adherence. The submitted photographs frequently featured family members and friends, and participants indicated that family and friends played a major role in motivating and supporting them. This study suggests that a Photovoice component has the potential to enhance weight management programs for teens as part of a text messaging intervention and as an independent entity. Further work should evaluate the effect of this promising intervention on weight loss.
    Childhood obesity (Print). 06/2012; 8(3):230-6.
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Stroke is a disease with tremendous individual, family, and societal impact across all race/ethnic groups. Mexican Americans, the largest subgroup of Hispanic Americans, are at even higher risk of stroke than European Americans. AIM: To test the effectiveness of a culturally sensitive, church-based, multi-component, motivational enhancement intervention for Mexican Americans and European Americans in reducing stroke risk factors. METHODS: Participants enroll in family or friendship pairs, from the same Catholic church in the Corpus Christi Texas area, and are encouraged to change diet and physical activity behaviors and provide support for behavior change to their partners. Churches are randomized to either the intervention or control group. Goal enrollment for each of the 10 participating churches is 40 participant pairs. The intervention consists of self-help materials (including a motivational short film, cookbook/healthy eating guide, physical activity guide with pedometer, and photonovella), five motivational interviewing calls, two tailored newsletters, parish health promotion activities and environmental changes, and a peer support workshop where participants learn to provide autonomy supportive counseling to their partner. SHARE's three primary outcomes are self-reported sodium intake, fruit and vegetable intake, and level of physical activity. Participants complete questionnaires and have measurements at baseline, six months, and twelve months. Persistence testing is performed at 18 months in the intervention group. The trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01378780).
    Contemporary clinical trials 03/2012; 33(4):721-9. · 1.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Adolescents participating in weight loss programs experience difficulty adhering to behavior change recommendations. Communications technology provides a low cost means to increase the frequency of contact with adolescents which can improve their engagement and also lead to behavior change. Within a larger project on the development of tailored text messages for adolescents enrolled in an existing multidisciplinary weight management program, this study explored participants' perspectives about message content. A library of messages was developed focused on topics central to weight management. Four focus groups were conducted with a total of 24 participants from the weight management program to gage their reactions to the messages. Detailed notes from the focus groups were analyzed to assess the acceptability of individual messages and to identify overriding themes. Results indicate that participants were very enthusiastic about receiving text messages. They preferred messages that provided recipe ideas, included successful weight loss strategies used by peers, and requested feedback regarding their progress. They preferred positive, encouraging, and direct messages. They were unanimous that messages should include encouraging symbols (e.g., exclamation points and "smiley faces") as often as possible. They emphasized that any mention of unhealthy foods or behaviors would trigger them to eat those foods or engage in those behaviors. Text messaging acronyms (e.g., LOL) were considered too informal for messages from healthcare providers. This study suggests that including text messages in obesity interventions is acceptable to obese adolescents as a means of supporting their weight loss efforts, and it highlights the need for such messages to be carefully constructed.
    Obesity 08/2011; 19(12):2382-7. · 3.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Weight gain is an important concern that impacts on breast cancer outcomes and general health in survivorship. This randomized, pilot study evaluated whether or not women could comply with a weight control program that is initiated at the beginning of chemotherapy for breast cancer. The program sought to prevent weight gain using a low-fat, high fruit-vegetable diet combined with moderate physical activity. The intervention was implemented using a telephone counseling approach that blended motivational interviewing with social cognitive theory. A total of 40 women were recruited over 9 months at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. This represents 55% of eligible women referred to the study and indicates that interest in a healthy lifestyle program at the initiation of chemotherapy for breast cancer was high. Subjects who dropped out had significantly lower fruit and vegetable intakes and lower blood carotenoids at baseline than subjects who completed the study. Statistically significant beneficial effects were observed on fruit and vegetable intakes, physical activity and breast cancer-specific well-being by the intervention. Mean body fat from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry increased in the written materials arm and decreased in the intervention arm. Of the enrolled women, 75% completed 12 months on study and satisfaction with study participation was high. These data indicate that lifestyle intervention during breast cancer treatment is feasible during treatment with chemotherapy for breast cancer and benefits women in several domains.
    The Open Obesity Journal 01/2011; 3:87-97.
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    ABSTRACT: We present the results of a clinical trial that tested the efficacy of using motivational interviewing (MI) in a group format to promote adherence to antiretroviral medications and risk reduction behaviors (RRB) in 203 predominately African American HIV infected women. It was compared to a group health promotion program. Participants were followed for 9 months. Adherence was measured by MEMS(®); and RRB by self-report. Controlling for recruitment site and years on ART, no significant group by time effects were observed. Attendance (≥7/8 sessions) modified the effects. Higher MI attendees had better adherence at all follow-ups, a borderline significant group by time effect (p = 0.1) for % Doses Taken on Schedule, a significantly larger proportion who reported abstinence at 2 weeks, 6, and 9 months, and always used protection during sex at 6 and 9 months. Though not conclusive, the findings offer some support for using MI in a group format to promote adherence and some risk reduction behaviors when adequate attendance is maintained.
    AIDS and Behavior 12/2010; 15(5):885-96. · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examined the use of tailored messages sent to the mobile phones of obese adolescents enrolled in a weight-management programme, as a means of increasing adherence. The feasibility study was conducted in three phases: (1) a library of 90 messages was developed about five weight-related behaviours; (2) a computer application was developed to tailor these messages to participants' characteristics; the SMS messages (text and images) were sent to mobile phones daily; (3) a three-month trial of the intervention was performed with 20 adolescents. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to assess the participants' perceptions of the intervention and the participants', providers' and computer consultants' reports about technology performance. These interviews revealed that participants were enthusiastic about the intervention and most found the messages to be personally relevant. The favourite messages were meal suggestions and recipe ideas. The computer tailoring application performed faultlessly and messages were delivered on schedule and in the desired sequence. Computerized tailored text messaging is a feasible adjunct to multidisciplinary obesity treatment and is acceptable to adolescents as an enjoyable means of improving their adherence to healthy lifestyle practices.
    Journal of telemedicine and telecare 10/2010; 16(8):458-61. · 0.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The ability to identify potentially resistant participants early in the course of an intervention could inform development of strategies for behavior change and improve program effectiveness. The objective of this analysis was to identify factors related to nonresponse (i.e., lack of behavior change) to an asthma management intervention for urban teenagers. The intervention targeted several behaviors, including medication adherence, having a rescue inhaler nearby, and smoking. A discriminate analysis was conducted using data from a randomized trial of the intervention. Included in this analysis are participants who reported a physician diagnosis of asthma, completed a baseline questionnaire, were randomized to the treatment group, completed >or=2 of 4 educational sessions, and completed >or=2 of 3 follow-up questionnaires. Ninety students met criteria for inclusion in this subgroup analysis. In logistic regression models for medication adherence, nonresponse was related to low baseline asthma self-regulation, odds ratio = 3.6 (95% confidence interval = 1.3-9.5). In models for having an inhaler nearby, nonresponse was related to low baseline self-regulation and to rebelliousness, OR = 4.7 (1.6-13.2) and 5.6 (1.7-18.0), respectively. Nonresponse to smoking messages was related to rebelliousness, low emotional support, and low religiosity, ORs = 7.6 (1.8-32.3), 9.5 (1.4-63.5), and 6.6 (1.5-29.8) respectively. Certain variables had the ability to discriminate the likelihood of response from that of nonresponse to an asthma program for urban, African American adolescents with asthma. These variables can be used to identify resistant subgroups early in the intervention, allowing the application of specialized strategies through tailoring. These types of analyses can inform behavioral interventions.
    Journal of Asthma 08/2010; 47(6):667-73. · 1.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We assessed change in fruit and vegetable intake in a population-based sample, comparing an online untailored program (arm 1) with a tailored behavioral intervention (arm 2) and with a tailored behavioral intervention plus motivational interviewing-based counseling via e-mail (arm 3). We conducted a randomized controlled intervention trial, enrolling members aged 21 to 65 years from 5 health plans in Seattle, Washington; Denver, Colorado; Minneapolis, Minnesota; Detroit, Michigan; and Atlanta, Georgia. Participants reported fruit and vegetable intake at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months. We assessed mean change in fruit and vegetable servings per day at 12 months after baseline, using a validated self-report fruit and vegetable food frequency questionnaire. Of 2540 trial participants, 80% were followed up at 12 months. Overall baseline mean fruit and vegetable intake was 4.4 servings per day. Average servings increased by more than 2 servings across all study arms (P<.001), with the greatest increase (+2.8 servings) among participants of arm 3 (P=.05, compared with control). Overall program satisfaction was high. This online nutritional intervention was well received, convenient, easy to disseminate, and associated with sustained dietary change. Such programs have promise as population-based dietary interventions.
    American Journal of Public Health 12/2009; 100(2):319-26. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Health behavior intervention studies have focused primarily on comparing new programs and existing programs via randomized controlled trials. However, numbers of possible components (factors) are increasing dramatically as a result of developments in science and technology (e.g., Web-based surveys). These changes dictate the need for alternative methods that can screen and quickly identify a large set of potentially important treatment components. We have developed and implemented a multiphase experimentation strategy for accomplishing this goal. We describe the screening phase of this strategy and the use of fractional factorial designs (FFDs) in studying several components economically. We then use 2 ongoing behavioral intervention projects to illustrate the usefulness of FFDs. FFDs should be supplemented with follow-up experiments in the refining phase so any critical assumptions about interactions can be verified.
    American Journal of Public Health 09/2008; 98(8):1354-9. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    Kenneth Resnicow, Scott E Page
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    ABSTRACT: Public health research and practice have been guided by a cognitive, rational paradigm where inputs produce linear, predictable changes in outputs. However, the conceptual and statistical assumptions underlying this paradigm may be flawed. In particular, this perspective does not adequately account for nonlinear and quantum influences on human behavior. We propose that health behavior change is better understood through the lens of chaos theory and complex adaptive systems. Key relevant principles include that behavior change (1) is often a quantum event; (2) can resemble a chaotic process that is sensitive to initial conditions, highly variable, and difficult to predict; and (3) occurs within a complex adaptive system with multiple components, where results are often greater than the sum of their parts.
    American Journal of Public Health 09/2008; 98(8):1382-9. · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: 'Tailoring' refers to any of a number of methods for creating communications individualized for their receivers, with the expectation that this individualization will lead to larger intended effects of these communications. Results so far have been generally positive but not consistently so, and this paper seeks to explicate tailoring to help focus future research. Tailoring involves either or both of two classes of goals (enhancing cognitive preconditions for message processing and enhancing message impact through modifying behavioral determinants of goal outcomes) and employs strategies of personalization, feedback and content matching. These goals and strategies intersect in a 2 x 3 matrix in which some strategies and their component tactics match better to some goals than to others. The paper illustrates how this framework can be systematically applied in generating research questions and identifying appropriate study designs for tailoring research.
    Health Education Research 07/2008; 23(3):454-66. · 1.66 Impact Factor
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    M. Heisler, K. Resnicow
    Clinical Diabetes. 01/2008; 26(4):161-165.
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    ABSTRACT: The majority of US youth are of healthy weight, but the majority of US adults are overweight or obese. Therefore, a major health challenge for most American children and adolescents is obesity prevention-today, and as they age into adulthood. In this report, we review the most recent evidence regarding many behavioral and practice interventions related to childhood obesity, and we present recommendations to health care providers. Because of the importance, we also suggest approaches that clinicians can use to encourage obesity prevention among children, including specific counseling strategies and practice-based, systems-level interventions. In addition, we suggest how clinicians may interact with and promote local and state policy initiatives designed to prevent obesity in their communities.
    PEDIATRICS 01/2008; 120 Suppl 4:S229-53. · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine whether pediatricians and dietitians can implement an office-based obesity prevention program using motivational interviewing as the primary intervention. Nonrandomized clinical trial. Fifteen pediatricians belonging to Pediatric Research in Office Settings, a national practice-based research network, and 5 registered dietitians were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) control; (2) minimal intervention (pediatrician only); or (3) intensive intervention (pediatrician and registered dietitian). Primary care pediatric offices. Ninety-one children presenting for well-child care visits met eligibility criteria of being aged 3 to 7 years and having a body mass index (calculated as the weight in kilograms divided by the height in meters squared) at the 85th percentile or greater but lower than the 95th percentile for the age or having a normal weight and a parent with a body mass index of 30 or greater. Pediatricians and registered dietitians in the intervention groups received motivational interviewing training. Parents of children in the minimal intervention group received 1 motivational interviewing session from the physician, and parents of children in the intensive intervention group received 2 motivational interviewing sessions each from the pediatrician and the registered dietitian. Change in the body mass index-for-age percentile. At 6 months' follow-up, there was a decrease of 0.6, 1.9, and 2.6 body mass index percentiles in the control, minimal, and intensive groups, respectively. The differences in body mass index percentile change between the 3 groups were nonsignificant (P=.85). The patient dropout rates were 2 (10%), 13 (32%), and 15 (50%) for the control, minimal, and intensive groups, respectively. Fifteen (94%) of the parents reported that the intervention helped them think about changing their family's eating habits. Motivational interviewing by pediatricians and dietitians is a promising office-based strategy for preventing childhood obesity. However, additional studies are needed to demonstrate the efficacy of this intervention in practice settings.
    Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 06/2007; 161(5):495-501. · 4.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patient self-management is a critical determinant of heart failure (HF) outcomes, yet patients with HF are often frail and socially isolated, factors that may limit their ability to manage self-care and access clinic-based services. Mobilizing peer support among HF patients is a promising strategy to improve self-management support. In this pilot, the authors evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of an interactive voice response (IVR)-based platform to facilitate telephone peer support among older adults with HF. Participants completed a baseline survey, were offered a 3-hour training session in peer communication skills, and were paired with another patient who had HF. Participants were asked to contact their partner weekly using a toll-free IVR phone system that protected their anonymity and provided automated reminders if contacts were not made. Times and duration of participants' telephone contacts were monitored and recorded. After the 7-week intervention, participants completed surveys and brief face-to-face interviews. The authors found high levels of use and satisfaction and improvements in depressive symptoms among the 20 pilot study participants. An IVR peer-support intervention is feasible, is acceptable to patients, and may have positive effects on patients' HF social support and health outcomes, in conjunction with structured health system support, that warrant more rigorous evaluation in a randomized trial.
    Congestive Heart Failure 05/2007; 13(3):149-57.
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    Andrea L Dunn, Kenneth Resnicow, Lisa M Klesges
    Health Education Research 01/2007; 21 Suppl 1:i121-124. · 1.66 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

553 Citations
37.62 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2013
    • University of Michigan
      • • School of Public Health
      • • Department of Health Behavior and Health Education
      Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
    • Arizona State University
      Phoenix, Arizona, United States
  • 2007
    • Harvard Medical School
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States