Natalie Trachtmann

Universität Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany

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Publications (3)6.53 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Rhodococcus (opacus) erythropolis HL PM-1 grows on 2,4,6-trinitrophenol or 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP) as a sole nitrogen source. The NADPH-dependent F(420) reductase (NDFR; encoded by npdG) and the hydride transferase II (HTII; encoded by npdI) of the strain were previously shown to convert both nitrophenols to their respective hydride Meisenheimer complexes. In the present study, npdG and npdI were amplified from six 2,4-DNP degrading Rhodococcus spp. The genes showed sequence similarities of 86 to 99% to the respective npd genes of strain HL PM-1. Heterologous expression of the npdG and npdI genes showed that they were involved in 2,4-DNP degradation. Sequence analyses of both the NDFRs and the HTIIs revealed conserved domains which may be involved in binding of NADPH or F(420). Phylogenetic analyses of the NDFRs showed that they represent a new group in the family of F(420)-dependent NADPH reductases. Phylogenetic analyses of the HTIIs revealed that they form an additional group in the family of F(420)-dependent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases and F(420)-dependent N(5),N(10)-methylenetetrahydromethanopterin reductases. Thus, the NDFRs and the HTIIs may each represent a novel group of F(420)-dependent enzymes involved in catabolism.
    Applied and Environmental Microbiology 06/2003; 69(5):2748-54. · 3.68 Impact Factor
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    Applied and Environmental Microbiology - AEM. 01/2003; 69(5):2748-2754.
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    ABSTRACT: Rhodococcus (opacus) erythropolis HL PM-1 grows on 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (picric acid) or 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP) as sole nitrogen source. A gene cluster involved in picric acid degradation was recently identified. The functional assignment of three of its genes, npdC, npdG and npdI, and the tentative functional assignment of a fourth one, npdH, is reported. The genes were expressed in Escherichia coli as His-tag fusion proteins that were purified by Ni-affinity chromatography. The enzyme activity of each protein was determined by spectrophotometry and HPLC analyses. NpdI, a hydride transferase, catalyses a hydride transfer from reduced F420 to the aromatic ring of picric acid, generating the hydride sigma-complex (hydride Meisenheimer complex) of picric acid (H(-)-PA). Similarly, NpdI also transformed 2,4-DNP to the hydride sigma-complex of 2,4-DNP. A second hydride transferase, NpdC catalysed a subsequent hydride transfer to H(-)-PA, to produce a dihydride sigma-complex of picric acid (2H(-)-PA). All three reactions required the activity of NpdG, an NADPH-dependent F420 reductase, for shuttling the hydride ions from NADPH to F420. NpdH converted 2H(-)-PA to a hitherto unknown product, X. The results show that npdC, npdG and npdI play a key role in the initial steps of picric acid degradation, and that npdH may prove to be important in the later stages.
    Microbiology 04/2002; 148(Pt 3):799-806. · 2.85 Impact Factor