Eric V. Schow

University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA, United States

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Publications (13)79.98 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Voltage-dependent ion channels open and close in response to changes in membrane electrical potential due to the motion of their voltage-sensing domains (VSDs). VSD charge displacements within the membrane electric field are observed in electrophysiology experiments as gating currents preceding ionic conduction. The elementary charge motions that give rise to the gating current cannot be observed directly, but appear as discrete current pulses that generate fluctuations in gating current measurements. Here we report direct observation of gating-charge displacements in an atomistic molecular dynamics simulation of the isolated VSD from the KvAP channel in a hydrated lipid bilayer on the timescale (10-μs) expected for elementary gating charge transitions. The results reveal that gating-charge displacements are associated with the water-catalyzed rearrangement of salt bridges between the S4 arginines and a set of conserved acidic side chains on the S1-S3 transmembrane segments in the hydrated interior of the VSD.
    Biophysical Journal 06/2012; 102(11):L44-6. · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Voltage-dependent potassium (Kv), sodium (Nav), and calcium channels open and close in response to changes in transmembrane (TM) potential, thus regulating cell excitability by controlling ion flow across the membrane. An outstanding question concerning voltage gating is how voltage-induced conformational changes of the channel voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) are coupled through the S4-S5 interfacial linking helices to the opening and closing of the pore domain (PD). To investigate the coupling between the VSDs and the PD, we generated a closed Kv channel configuration from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) using atomistic simulations with experiment-based restraints on the VSDs. Full closure of the channel required, in addition to the experimentally determined TM displacement, that the VSDs be displaced both inwardly and laterally around the PD. This twisting motion generates a tight hydrophobic interface between the S4-S5 linkers and the C-terminal ends of the pore domain S6 helices in agreement with available experimental evidence.
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 03/2012; 1818(7):1726-1736. · 4.66 Impact Factor
  • Biophysical Journal 01/2012; 102(3):686-. · 3.67 Impact Factor
  • Biophysical Journal 01/2012; 102(3):167-. · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and sensory rhodopsin II (SRII), homologous photoactive proteins in haloarchaea, have different molecular functions. BR is a light-driven proton pump, whereas SRII is a phototaxis receptor that transmits a light-induced conformational change to its transducer HtrII. Despite these distinctly different functions, a single residue substitution, Ala215 to Thr215 in the BR retinal-binding pocket, enables its photochemical reactions to transmit signals to HtrII and mediate phototaxis. We pursued a crystal structure of the signaling BR mutant (BR_A215T) to determine the structural changes caused by the A215T mutation and to assess what new photochemistry is likely to be introduced into the BR photoactive site. We crystallized BR_A215T from bicelles and solved its structure to 3.0 Å resolution to enable an atomic-level comparison. The analysis was complemented by molecular dynamics simulation of BR mutated in silico. Three main conclusions regarding the roles of photoactive site residues in signaling emerge from the comparison of BR_A215T, BR, and SRII structures: (i) the Thr215 residue in signaling BR is positioned nearly identically with respect to the retinal chromophore as in SRII, consistent with its role in producing a steric conflict with the retinal C₁₄ group during photoisomerization, proposed earlier to be essential for SRII signaling from vibrational spectroscopy and motility measurements; (ii) Tyr174-Thr204 hydrogen bonding, critical in SRII signaling and mimicked in signaling BR, is likely auxiliary, for example, to maintain Thr204 in the proper position for the steric trigger to occur; and (iii) the primary role of Arg72 in SRII is spectral tuning and not signaling.
    Journal of Molecular Biology 11/2011; 415(3):455-63. · 3.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The voltage-gated proton channel (Hv1) is homologous to the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels but lacks a separate pore domain. The Hv1 monomer has dual functions: it gates the proton current and also serves as the proton conduction pathway. To gain insight into the structure and dynamics of the yet unresolved proton permeation pathway, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of two different Hv1 homology models in a lipid bilayer in excess water. The structure of the Kv1.2-Kv2.1 paddle-chimera VSD was used as template to generate both models, but they differ in the sequence alignment of the S4 segment. In both models, we observe a water wire that extends through the membrane, whereas the corresponding region is dry in simulations of the Kv1.2-Kv2.1 paddle-chimera. We find that the kinetic stability of the water wire is dependent upon the identity and location of the residues lining the permeation pathway, in particular, the S4 arginines. A measurement of water transport kinetics indicates that the water wire is a relatively static feature of the permeation pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that proton conduction in Hv1 may occur via Grotthuss hopping along a robust water wire, with exchange of water molecules between inner and outer ends of the permeation pathway minimized by specific water-protein interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane protein structure and function.
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 08/2011; 1818(2):286-93. · 4.66 Impact Factor
  • Biophysical Journal 01/2011; 100:131. · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several laboratories have carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of arginine interactions with lipid bilayers and found that the energetic cost of placing arginine in lipid bilayers is an order of magnitude greater than observed in molecular biology experiments in which Arg-containing transmembrane helices are inserted across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane by the Sec61 translocon. We attempt here to reconcile the results of the two approaches. We first present MD simulations of guanidinium groups alone in lipid bilayers, and then, to mimic the molecular biology experiments, we present simulations of hydrophobic helices containing single Arg residues at different positions along the helix. We discuss the simulation results in the context of molecular biology results and show that the energetic discrepancy is reduced, but not eliminated, by considering free energy differences between Arg at the interface and at the center of the model helices. The reduction occurs because Arg snorkeling to the interface prevents Arg from residing in the bilayer center where the energetic cost of desolvation is highest. We then show that the problem with MD simulations is that they measure water-to-bilayer free energies, whereas the molecular biology experiments measure the energetics of partitioning from translocon to bilayer, which raises the fundamental question of the relationship between water-to-bilayer and water-to-translocon partitioning. We present two thermodynamic scenarios as a foundation for reconciliation of the simulation and molecular biology results. The simplest scenario is that translocon-to-bilayer partitioning is independent of water-to-bilayer partitioning; there is no thermodynamic cycle connecting the two paths.
    Journal of Membrane Biology 01/2011; 239(1-2):35-48. · 2.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels undergo a series of conformational changes upon membrane depolarization, from a down state when the channel is at rest to an up state, all of which lead to the opening of the channel pore. The crystal structures reported to date reveal the pore in an open state and the VSDs in an up state. To gain insights into the structure of the down state, we used a set of experiment-based restraints to generate a model of the down state of the KvAP VSD using molecular-dynamics simulations of the VSD in a lipid bilayer in excess water. The equilibrated VSD configuration is consistent with the biotin-avidin accessibility and internal salt-bridge data used to generate it, and with additional biotin-avidin accessibility data. In the model, both the S3b and S4 segments are displaced approximately 10 A toward the intracellular side with respect to the up-state configuration, but they do not move as a rigid body. Arginine side chains that carry the majority of the gating charge also make large excursions between the up and down states. In both states, arginines interact with water and participate in salt bridges with acidic residues and lipid phosphate groups. An important feature that emerges from the down-state model is that the N-terminal half of the S4 segment adopts a 3(10)-helical conformation, which appears to be necessary to satisfy a complex salt-bridge network.
    Biophysical Journal 06/2010; 98(12):2857-66. · 3.67 Impact Factor
  • Biophysical Journal - BIOPHYS J. 01/2010; 98(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the growing number of atomic-resolution membrane protein structures, direct structural information about proteins in their native membrane environment is scarce. This problem is particularly relevant in the case of the highly charged S1–S4 voltage-sensing domains responsible for nerve impulses, where interactions with the lipid bilayer are critical for the function of voltage-activated ion channels. Here we use neutron diffraction, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structure and hydration of bilayer membranes containing S1–S4 voltage-sensing domains. Our results show that voltage sensors adopt transmembrane orientations and cause a modest reshaping of the surrounding lipid bilayer, and that water molecules intimately interact with the protein within the membrane. These structural findings indicate that voltage sensors have evolved to interact with the lipid membrane while keeping energetic and structural perturbations to a minimum, and that water penetrates the membrane, to hydrate charged residues and shape the transmembrane electric field.
    Nature 11/2009; 462(7272):473-479. · 38.60 Impact Factor
  • Biophysical Journal 01/2009; 96(3). · 3.67 Impact Factor
  • Biophysical Journal 01/2009; 96(3). · 3.67 Impact Factor