Yogesh S Shouche

National Centre For Cell Science, Pune, Poona, Maharashtra, India

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Publications (252)558.88 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Class1 integrons are one of the prevalent mechanisms of antibiotic resistance gene transfer in Gram negative organisms, but their prevalence and role in the spread of antibiotic resistance genes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is unexplored. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of class 1 integrons in clinical isolates of MRSA. Methodology: One hundred and forty three MRSA isolates obtained from two different cities in India (Pune and Mumbai) were characterized by biochemical tests and the antibiotic sensitivity was performed using the CLSI guidelines. The presence of class 1 integrons, sul1/qacEΔ1 region of class 1 integron and mecA gene among these isolates was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: All 143 isolates were mecA positive and coagulase positive. Overall, 71% of the MRSA isolates carried class 1 integrons. Fifty eight percent (45/77) of the isolates obtained from Mumbai and 85% (56/66) of the isolates from Pune, carried class 1 integrons. Thirty nine percent of these isolates carried sul1/qacEΔ1 region, thus confirming the association of class 1 integrons with antibiotic resistance genes. Along with β-lactam antibiotics the MRSA isolates were resistant to several other antibiotics, with resistance to erythromycin, ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole being observed in 75%, 66% and 60% of the isolates, respectively. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of class 1 integrons in MRSA isolates from India. The study provides insights into prevalence of a novel mechanism adapted by MRSA for the propagation of antibiotic resistance genes.
    Indian journal of medical microbiology 04/2015; Volume 33(2):231-36. DOI:10.4103/0255-0857.154905 · 1.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In low temperature nitrogen-deficient ecosystems, native microorganisms must possess adaptive mechanisms to cope with environmental stress as well as nitrogen (N) starvation-like conditions. However, moderate information is available about the cold adapted diazotrophs and diazotrophy. The aim of this study was to examine the proteomic response(s) of Himalayan psychrotrophic diazotroph under low temperature nitrogen fixing conditions. Proteomic analysis of Pseudomonas palleroniana N26 was carried out using two dimensional electrophoresis technique. Altogether, fifty three protein spots were found to be differentially expressed revealing several mechanisms thought to be involved in low temperature adaptation and nitrogen fixation, including general stress adaptation, protein synthesis and modifications, and energy metabolism. Expression profiling of the spots revealed the up-regulation of low molecular weight acidic proteins; a majority of which were stress proteins. The largest group of down-regulated proteins were related to biosynthetic processes; thereby, providing the evidence for stress-associated metabolic adaptations. The present study, which provides an overview of the cold diazotrophy of a Himalayan psychrotrophic bacterium and its adaptive responses, can facilitate further studies of low temperature nitrogen fixing mechanisms, psychrophilic diazotrophic markers, and transgenic microorganism(s)/crop(s) development.
    Cryo letters 04/2015; 36(2):74-82. · 0.64 Impact Factor
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    Current science 03/2015; · 0.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The response of cellular fatty acids to various environmental stresses was studied using two endophytic species of Micrococcus. A total of 18 samples with three biological replicates from low, moderate and high stress conditions of salt (0.5, 5 and 10 % NaCl), pH (5, 7 and 10) and temperatures (15, 25 and 41 °C) were analysed. Branched chain fatty acids dominated in both the organisms, while saturated and unsatu-rated fatty acids were detected less frequently. The mole percentage of isoforms of branched chain fatty acids gradually increased with increasing salinity and showed more than a twofold increase at higher concentration of salt (10 %). Unlike Micrococcus yunnanensis DSM 21948 T , Micrococcus aloeverae MCC 2184 T showed more agreement with previous findings related to stress tolerance in other bacteria. Data indicate that iso fatty acids are responsible for the growth of Micrococcus at high salt concentration. In addition, instead of individual fatty acids, the ratio of the total content of iso/ anteiso forms modulates membrane fluidity and functions during environmental stress in Micrococcus. For a comparative study of salinity stress in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, the strain of Halomonas was alsoincluded.
    Annals of Microbiology 03/2015; DOI:10.1007/s13213-015-1061-x · 1.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Agriculture is an important livelihood activity in the Himalayan regions. Our previous studies revealed the presence of diverse diazotrophic assemblage in indigenous red kidney bean (RKB) rhizospheric soil from two different locations of Western Indian Himalaya, namely S1 (Chhiplakot, 30.70◦ N/80.30◦ E) and S2 (Munsyari, 30.60◦ N/80.20◦ E), selected on the basis of real-time PCR analysis. In this study, two 16S rRNA gene clone libraries (SB1 and SB2, respectively) were constructed using the same rhizospheric soil samples for assessing the total bacterial diversity and their community structure. A total of 760 clones were obtained, with ∼54–59% of these sequences belonging to the phylum Proteobacteria. While sequences belonging to Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Acidobactria, Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, Nitrospira, Gemmatimonadetes, Cyanobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, OD1, OP11 and Actinobacteria were encountered in both the soils, sequences belonging to bacteria from the classes Chlorobi and BRC1 were only detected in the S1 soil. Both the libraries showed similar bacterial community compositions, with Pseudomonas (∼33–34%) as predominant genus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all the clone sequences were clustered in different bacterial groups as per their resemblance with their respective phylogenetic neighbours. Major clusters were formed by Gammapreoteobacteria followed by Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria. A good fraction of the clone sequences has no resemblance with existing groups, thereby suggesting the need of culture-dependent studies from Himalayan regions. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first major metagenomic effort on Himalayan RKBs rhizobacteria revealing fundamental information that needs to be explored for functional studies.
    Biologia 02/2015; 73(3). DOI:10.1515/biolog-2015-0048 · 0.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Two novel Gram-stain negative facultative anaerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacterial strains IG-V01(T) and IG-V01b were isolated from the gut of red flour beetles, Tribolium castaneum. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains IG-V01(T) and IG-V01b were found to have their highest sequence similarity (96.5 % and 96.4 %) with Serratia nematodiphila DZ0503SBS1(T) (Enterobacteriaceae family) respectively. Strains IG-V01(T) and IG-V01b share 100 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and exhibit very similar phenotypic characteristics. In addition, they show 89.7 % genomic relatedness (DNA-DNA hybridisation). Major fatty acids were identified to be C16:0 (38.3 %), C17:0 cyclo (19.5-20 %) and C14:0 (11.2-11.3 %). Cells contain phosphatidylethanolamine and diphosphatidylglycerol as predominant polar lipids. Genomic DNA G+C content (mol%) was determined to be 51.5-51.7. A polyphasic approach employing the study of morphological, physiological, chemotaxonomic, genomic and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the two newly isolated strains cannot be placed in any of the existing genera of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Therefore, it is proposed that strains IG-V01(T) and IG-V01b belong to a novel genus within the family Enterobacteriaceae, and represent a new species Enterobacillus tribolii gen. nov., sp. nov., with the type strain =IG-V01(T) = KCTC 42159(T) = MCC 2532(T).
    Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 02/2015; 107(5). DOI:10.1007/s10482-015-0412-8 · 2.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Two novel Gram-stain negative facultative anaerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacterial strains IG-V01T and IG-V01b were isolated from the gut of red flour beetles, Tribolium castaneum. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains IG-V01T and IG-V01b were found to have their highest sequence similarity (96.5 % and 96.4 %) with Serratia nematodiphila DZ0503SBS1T (Enterobacteriaceae family) respectively. Strains IG-V01T and IG-V01b share 100 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and exhibit very similar phenotypic characteristics. In addition, they show 89.7 % genomic relatedness (DNA–DNA hybridisation). Major fatty acids were identified to be C16:0 (38.3 %), C17:0 cyclo (19.5–20 %) and C14:0 (11.2–11.3 %). Cells contain phosphatidylethanolamine and diphosphatidylglycerol as predominant polar lipids. Genomic DNA G+C content (mol%) was determined to be 51.5–51.7. A polyphasic approach employing the study of morphological, physiological, chemotaxonomic, genomic and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the two newly isolated strains cannot be placed in any of the existing genera of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Therefore, it is proposed that strains IG-V01T and IG-V01b belong to a novel genus within the family Enterobacteriaceae, and represent a new species Enterobacillus tribolii gen. nov., sp. nov., with the type strain =IG-V01T = KCTC 42159T = MCC 2532T.
    Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 02/2015; 107(5):Antonie van Leeuwenhoek. · 2.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Two pinkish red coloured Gram-stain negative, non-motile aerobic bacterial strains MCC P1T and MCC P2 capable of growing at low temperatures (15oC) were isolated from saline water Lake, western Himalayas of India. Strains were capable of growing at 0-2.0% NaCl and pH 6.5-9.0. 16S rRNA based phylogenetic analysis revealed its closest similarity 96.3 % to the only type strain of the genus Rufibacter, Rufibacter tibetensis. Two novel strains MCC P1 and MCC P2 shared 99.0 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The major cellular fatty acids are c15:0 iso, c17:1 ω6c, summed Feature 3 (c16:1ω6c/c16:1 ω7c) and summed Feature 4 (c17:1 anteiso b/ c17:1 iso i). Predominant polar lipids of the strains were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol. Respiratory quinone was MK-7. The DNA G+C content of the strains was 52.6-52.8 mol%. Based on morphological, physiological, chemotaxonomical and molecular characteristics, strains MCC P1 and MCC P2 were different from the existing type strain of the genus Rufibacter. Hence, MCC P1T (= MCC 2268 = CCTCC AB 2013351 = Rufibacter immobilis sp. nov.) is proposed as a novel species of the genus Rufibacter, Rufibacter immobilis.
    International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 02/2015; DOI:10.1099/ijs.0.000144 · 2.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is a growing interest in subtype (ST) analysis of the intestinal parasite Blastocystis due to its extensive genetic diversity that might reflect differences in pathogenicity. Although essential for reference, few studies are available on Blastocystis in healthy individuals. Moreover, molecular epidemiology data on Blastocystis in India still remain to emerge. In the present study we identified the prevalence and ST distribution of Blastocystis in healthy Indian individuals. A total of 220 stool samples were obtained; four of 100 samples from 100 adults were chosen randomly for construction of small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene clone libraries in order to elucidate micro-eukaryotic diversity in the human gut. From the SSU rDNA library, 64 sequences annotated to Blastocystis were used for ST analysis along with sequences obtained by direct sequencing of SSU rDNA PCR products amplified from the remaining samples and generated using primers targeting Blastocystis. Of 220 stool samples collected, 120 samples from 30 infants (aged 1week to 1year) were PCR-negative. Of the remaining 100 samples from 100 adults, 27 resulted in specific amplification. Out of these 27, four samples were suspected of mixed ST infection and so these samples were further analyzed by construction of clone libraries. Analysis of cloned sequences revealed that indeed 2 samples had mixed ST infection (ST1 and ST3) while the remaining two showed infection with two separate ST3 strains. ST3 was the most common ST present in our study group (100%) followed by ST1 (7.4%); ST1 was seen only in mixed infections. SSU rDNA clone library sequences generated by processing of pooled samples were identified as ST3. The majority of ST3 sequences exhibited allele 34 commonly found in the European population. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    Infection Genetics and Evolution 02/2015; 31. DOI:10.1016/j.meegid.2015.02.012 · 3.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract A Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped, endospore-forming, aerobic bacterium designated as SGD-V-25T was isolated from Veraval sediment sample, India. Strain SGD-V-25T is capable of growing at 25-50°C (optimum 37°C), pH 6-12 (optimum pH 7.0) and with 0-5% NaCl (w/v). Taxonomic position of this strain was deduced using a polyphasic approach and the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the isolate belongs to the division Firmicutes, forming the cluster with B. badius MTCC 1548T, with which it shares highest similarity of 99.1% with 13 nucleotides differences. Other type strains of Bacillus species showed less than 96.0% similarity. The cell wall contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. The polar lipid profile of strain SGD-V-25T showed the presence of diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), phosphatidyl glycerol (PG), phsophoglycolipid (PGL), and two aminophospholipid. The predominant isoprenoid quinone was MK-7. The major cellular fatty acids were iso-C15:0, anteiso-C15:0, anteiso-C17:0, iso-C16:0, C16:1 ω11c and C16:0. The G+C content of strain SGD-V-25T was 37.6 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization, strain SGD-V-25T was clearly distinguished from closely related member of the Bacillus genus, for which the name Bacillus encimensis sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is SGD-V-25T (=NCIM 5513T=DSM 28241T).
    International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 02/2015; DOI:10.1099/ijs.0.000114 · 2.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present investigation was to isolate haloarchaea from rock pit sea water, West Coast of India and to explore their potential in production of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) which converts light energy into electrical energy. Haloarchaeal strains were isolated from rock pit sea water samples collected from Rock garden, Malvan, West Coast of India. Based on morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics, and 16 S rRNA gene sequencing, all the 11 strains were identified as Halostagnicola larsenii. All the strains require at least 1.5 M NaCl for growth; grow optimally in the range of 3.5-5.2 M NaCl. BR was detected in all the strains in the range of 0.035- 0.258 g/l. All eleven strains showed conversion of light energy into electrical energy in the range of 0.7-44.2 mV, when exposed to sunlight. A haloarchaeon, Halostagnicola larsenii is isolated from rock pit sea water and demonstrated to have bacteriorhodopsin that converted light energy into electrical energy. The present investigation is presumably the first report of isolation of Halostagnicola larsenii from low salinity environment and its potential in production of bacteriorhodopsin. The haloarchaeon could be explored for generation of electrical energy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Journal of Applied Microbiology 02/2015; 118(6). DOI:10.1111/jam.12784 · 2.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mosquito gut is a rich source of microorganisms. These microorganisms exhibit close association and contribute various physiological processes taking place in mosquito gut. The present study is aimed to characterize two bacterial isolates M19 and GB11 recovered from the gut of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito collected from Bhuj and Jamnagar districts of Gujarat, India. Both the strains were characterized using polyphasic approach including, phenotypic characterization, whole cell protein profiling and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene and groESL region. Sequences of 16S rRNA gene of M19 and GB11 were 99% similar to Vagococcus carniphilus and Vagococcus fluvialis. But phenotypic profile, whole cell protein profile and sequence of groESL region of both isolates were found to be similar to V. fluvialis. Based on phenotypic, genotypic and protein profiling, both the strains were identified as V. fluvialis. So far this species was known from domestic animals and human sources only. This is the first report of V. fluvialis inhabiting midgut of Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquito collected from Arabian sea coastal of India.
    Journal of vector borne diseases 01/2015; 52(1):52-7. · 1.04 Impact Factor
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    Ashish Polkade, Rohit Sharma, Yogesh Shouche
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    ABSTRACT: Species is the basic unit of identific ation of a large diversity of org anisms. The concep t of species is old and has undergone s everal changes depe nding on the kind of organism(s). Earlier concepts were formulated consider ing mostly macroorganisms (plant or animals). In the 21st century the microbial species concept took shape which chan ged from morphological, ecological, biological and phylogenetic to more agreea ble polyphasic species concept. Polyphasic species concept involves a combination of characters such as morphology, physiology, biochemical markers and sequencing of various regi ons of the DNA known as molecular markers. Ther e are also specific cri- teria such as DNA–DNA hybridizat ion for complex genera of bacter ia and archaea, extrolite profil- ing for complex genera of fungi, etc. Although species concept and taxonomy of bacteria are more systematic than fungi, taxonomy in all three king doms (bacteria, arch aea and fungi) is undergoing changes. The time is not far when genome sequenci ng will be considered as another criterion for delineating species. This article discusses the role of various techniques (MALDI, FAME, etc.) in species identification . The concept of Candidatus species and species annotation for metagenomic studies is also discussed. We briefly describe the criteria used to delineate species in various mi- crobes and the need for diffe rent species concepts based on the kind of organism.
    Current science 01/2015; 108. · 0.83 Impact Factor
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    Sanket Tembe, Yogesh Shouche, H V Ghate
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies from East Asia and Canadian National Collection of Insects have established the utility of DNA barcoding technique in identification of true bugs. The present study is an expansion of the database by adding mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (mtCOI) sequences from forty three species of indigenous true bugs of India. mtCOI gene analysis of infraorder Pentatomomorpha covering a total of seventy three species that belong to five superfamilies; Pentatomoidea, Coreoidea, Pyrrhocoroidea, Lygaeoidea and Aradoidea revealed more than 3% interspecific distances in all the taxa studied except for two cases which showed barcode sharing. Less than 2% intra-specific divergence was observed in 97% of the taxa analysed and the average interspecies genetic distance was about 29 times higher than the average intraspecies genetic divergence. Distinct sequence divergence pattern at generic level and NJ clustering analysis suggests that COI barcode is an excellent molecular marker for species level identification of unknown taxa; however it may not be useful for resolving deep levels of divergence. Species identification even at nymphal stage could be achieved confirming the efficacy of this technique.
    12/2014; 2:737-45. DOI:10.1016/j.mgene.2014.09.006
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    ABSTRACT: Transgenic crops expressing toxin proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been deployed on a large scale for management of Helicoverpa armigera. Resistance to Bt toxins has been documented in several papers, and therefore, we examined the role of midgut microflora of H. armigera in its susceptibility to Bt toxins. The susceptibility of H. armigera to Bt toxin Cry1Ac was assessed using Log-dose-Probit analysis, and the microbial communities were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. The H. armigera populations from nine locations harbored diverse microbial communities, and had some unique bacteria, suggesting a wide geographical variation in microbial community in the midgut of the pod borer larvae. Phylotypes belonging to 32 genera were identified in the H. armigera midgut in field populations from nine locations. Bacteria belonging to Enterobacteriaceae (Order Bacillales) were present in all the populations, and these may be the common members of the H. armigera larval midgut microflora. Presence and/or absence of certain species were linked to H. armigera susceptibility to Bt toxins, but there were no clear trends across locations. Variation in susceptibility of F1 neonates of H. armigera from different locations to the Bt toxin Cry1Ac was found to be 3.4-fold. These findings support the idea that insect migut microflora may influence the biological activity of Bt toxins.
    Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology 12/2014; 87(4). DOI:10.1002/arch.21190 · 1.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A novel Gram-stain positive, endospore-forming bacterium, designated SGD-14(T), was isolated from a marine sediment sample in Goa Province, India. Cells of the isolate were found to be strictly aerobic. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain SGD-14(T) showed a similarity of 99.5 % with Bacillus endophyticus and similarities to other Bacillus type strains were below 96 %. The whole-cell sugar pattern was found to consist of ribose, xylose and glucose. The predominant menaquinone was identified as MK-7 and the major fatty acids as anteiso-C15:0, iso-C15:0, iso-C16:0, anteiso-C17:0, C16:0 and iso-C14:0. The strain was found to grow optimally at 30 °C and pH 7.0-7.5. DNA G + C content was determined to be 39.6 mol%. The phospholipid pattern was found to consist of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. DNA-DNA hybridization studies between strain SGD-14(T) and B. endophyticus CIP106778(T) showed that strain SGD-14(T) exhibited <70 % similarity with B. endophyticus CIP106778(T). Differences in phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics between the novel strain and B. endophyticus CIP106778(T) further confirmed that this isolate represents novel species. Phylogenetic analysis showed that strain SGD-14(T) fits in the same clade with B. endophyticus with 100 % bootstrap values. Strain SGD-14(T) is therefore considered to represent a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus filamentosus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Bacillus filamentosus is SGD-14(T) = (=NCIM 5491(T) = DSM 27955(T)).
    Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 11/2014; 107(2). DOI:10.1007/s10482-014-0341-y · 2.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A novel pale-pink coloured strain, designated NIO-1023(T), was isolated from a marine sediment sample from Chorao Island, Goa, India. The taxonomic position of strain NIO-1023(T) was investigated by using a polyphasic approach. The cells were observed to be Gram-stain positive, coccal shaped and non-spore forming. Phylogenetic analyses using the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate indicated that the organism belongs to the genus Deinococcus. The strain NIO-1023(T) showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with Deinococcus ficus (97.8 %), whereas other Deinococcus species showed less than 95 % sequence similarity. The DNA-DNA relatedness with respect to D. ficus CC-FR2-10(T) was 23.9 %. Chemotaxonomic data revealed that strain NIO-1023(T) contains only menaquinone MK-8 as the respiratory quinone and a complex polar lipid profile consisting of different unidentified glycolipids and polar lipids, two unknown phospholipids and three unknown phosphoglycolipids. As in other deinococci, one of these phosphoglycolipids was predominant in the profile. The predominant fatty acids were identified as C17:1 w8c, C16:1 w6c/w7c, C15:1 w6c and C17:1 w9c. The genomic DNA G + C content of strain NIO-1023(T) was determined to be 67.2 mol%. The biochemical and chemotaxonomic properties demonstrate that strain NIO-1023(T) represents a novel species, for which the name Deinococcus enclensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NIO-1023(T) (=DSM 25127(T) = NCIM 5456(T)).
    Antonie van Leeuwenhoek 10/2014; DOI:10.1007/s10482-014-0311-4 · 2.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bacterial diversity of the Soldhar hot spring, located in the Chamoli district of Uttarakhand, India, was investigated using a clone library, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and functional genes. Physicochemical analysis of sediment samples indicated an oligotrophic environment with very low sulfur content. Based on the 16S rRNA gene studies Proteobacteria was the most predominant group in all the three approaches. Other dominant phyla were Deinococcus-Thermus and Aquificae. Pyrobaculum was the only archaeal genus detected by DGGE. In the functional gene analysis, the nifH library showed a single operational taxonomic unit (OTU) related to the genus Paenibacillus whereas the aoxB library showed three OTUs related to Acidovorax, Aminobacter and Agrobacterium. Our results demonstrate for the first time both the bacterial and archaeal diversity in the Soldhar hot spring by culture-independent techniques, thereby providing important information that will increase our understanding of the microbial ecology of the Soldhar hot spring.
    Annals of Microbiology 09/2014; DOI:10.1007/s13213-014-0970-4 · 1.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Significant morbidity and potential mortality following dengue virus infection is a re-emerging global health problem. Due to the limited effectiveness of current disease control methods, mosquito biologists have been searching for new methods of controlling dengue transmission. While much effort has concentrated on determining genetic aspects to vector competence, paratransgenetic approaches could also uncover novel vector control strategies. The interactions of mosquito midgut microflora and pathogens may play significant roles in vector biology. However, little work has been done to see how the microbiome influences the host's fitness and ultimately vector competence. Here we investigated the effects of the midgut microbial environment and dengue infection on several fitness characteristics among three strains of the primary dengue virus vector mosquito Aedes aegypti. This included comparisons of dengue infection rates of females with and without their normal midgut flora. According to our findings, few effects on fitness characteristics were evident following microbial clearance or with dengue virus infection. Adult survivorship significantly varied due to strain and in one strain varied due to antibiotic treatment. Fecundity varied in one strain due to microbial clearance by antibiotics but no variation was observed in fertility due to either treatment. We show here that fitness characteristics of Ae. aegypti vary largely between strains, including varying response to microflora presence or absence, but did not vary in response to dengue virus infection.
    Acta Tropica 09/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.actatropica.2014.07.015 · 2.52 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
558.88 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1998–2015
    • National Centre For Cell Science, Pune
      • Molecular Biology Laboratory
      Poona, Maharashtra, India
  • 2014
    • Agharkar Research Institute
      • Division Of Microbial Sciences
      Poona, Maharashtra, India
  • 1997–2014
    • University of Pune
      Poona, Mahārāshtra, India
  • 2012
    • Goa University
      Nova Goa, Goa, India
  • 2011
    • Indian Institute of Technology Madras
      • Department of Biotechnology
      Chennai, State of Tamil Nadu, India
  • 2009
    • Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen
      • Institut für Angewandte Mikrobiologie
      Gießen, Hesse, Germany
    • Central University of Punjab
      BUP, Punjab, India
  • 2008
    • G. B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar
      • Department of Microbiology
      Uttarkāshi, Uttarakhand, India