Yogesh S Shouche

National Centre For Cell Science, Pune, Poona, Mahārāshtra, India

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Publications (226)470.45 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Significant morbidity and potential mortality following dengue virus infection is a re-emerging global health problem. Due to the limited effectiveness of current disease control methods, mosquito biologists have been searching for new methods of controlling dengue transmission. While much effort has concentrated on determining genetic aspects to vector competence, paratransgenetic approaches could also uncover novel vector control strategies. The interactions of mosquito midgut microflora and pathogens may play significant roles in vector biology. However, little work has been done to see how the microbiome influences the host's fitness and ultimately vector competence. Here we investigated the effects of the midgut microbial environment and dengue infection on several fitness characteristics among three strains of the primary dengue virus vector mosquito Aedes aegypti. This included comparisons of dengue infection rates of females with and without their normal midgut flora. According to our findings, few effects on fitness characteristics were evident following microbial clearance or with dengue virus infection. Adult survivorship significantly varied due to strain and in one strain varied due to antibiotic treatment. Fecundity varied in one strain due to microbial clearance by antibiotics but no variation was observed in fertility due to either treatment. We show here that fitness characteristics of Ae. aegypti vary largely between strains, including varying response to microflora presence or absence, but did not vary in response to dengue virus infection.
    Acta tropica. 09/2014;
  • Rahul C. Salunkhe, Ketan P. Narkhede, Yogesh S. Shouche
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    ABSTRACT: Wolbachia are maternally inherited endosymbiotic alpha-proteobacteria found in terrestrial arthropods and filarial nematodes. They are transmitted vertically through host cytoplasm and alter host biology by inducing various reproductive alterations, like feminization, parthenogenesis, male killing (MK) and cytoplasmic incompatibility. In butterflies, some effects especially MK and sperm-egg incompatibility are well established. All these effects skew the sex ratio towards female and subsequently favor the vertical transmission of Wolbachia. Some of the insects are also infected with multiple Wolbachia strains which may results in some complex phenomenon. In the present review the potential of Wolbachia for promoting evolutionary changes in its hosts with emphasis on recent advances in interactions of butterfly–Wolbachia is discussed. In addition to this, strain diversity of Wolbachia and its effects on various butterfly hosts are also highlighted.
    Indian Journal of Microbiology 09/2014; 54(3). · 0.46 Impact Factor
  • Rahul C. Salunkhe, Ketan P. Narkhede, Yogesh S. Shouche
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    ABSTRACT: Wolbachia are maternally inherited endosymbiotic alpha-proteobacteria found in terrestrial arthropods and filarial nematodes. They are transmitted vertically through host cytoplasm and alter host biology by inducing various reproductive alterations, like feminization, parthenogenesis, male killing (MK) and cytoplasmic incompatibility. In butterflies, some effects especially MK and sperm-egg incompatibility are well established. All these effects skew the sex ratio towards female and subsequently favor the vertical transmission of Wolbachia. Some of the insects are also infected with multiple Wolbachia strains which may results in some complex phenomenon. In the present review the potential of Wolbachia for promoting evolutionary changes in its hosts with emphasis on recent advances in interactions of butterfly–Wolbachia is discussed. In addition to this, strain diversity of Wolbachia and its effects on various butterfly hosts are also highlighted.
    Indian Journal of Microbiology 09/2014; 54(3):249-254. · 0.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A yellow pigmented Gram- stain-positive, non-motile, non-endospore -forming, spherical-shape endophytic actinobacterium strain AE-6T was isolated from inner fleshy leaf tissues of Aloe barbadensis (Aloe vera) collected from, Pune, Maharashtra, India. Strain AE-6T grew at high salt (10% NaCl), between15 - 41 °C temperature and in 5 -12 pH range. It showed highest (99.6%) 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Micrococcus luteus NCTC 2665T and Micrococcocus yunnanensis YIM 65004T followed by Micrococcus endophyticus YIM 56238T (98.8%). Ribosomal protein profiling by MALDI-TOF/MS also showed closest relatedness with M. yunnanensis YIM 65004T and M. luteus NCTC 2665T. Like other members of the genus Micrococcus, strain AE-6T contained high contents of branched chain fatty acids (iso-C15:0 and anteiso-C15:0) and MK-8(H2) & MK-8 as predominant isoprenoid quinones. Cell wall analysis showed "A2 L-Lys-peptide subunit" type of peptidoglycan and ribose as major cell wall sugar. The DNA G+C content was 70 mol%. Results of DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) with closest relatives from the genus Micrococcus showed less than 70% value. Based on the results of this study, strain AE-6T showed clear-cut delineation from existing members of the genus Micrococcus and proposed as Micrococcus aloeverae sp. nov. with strain AE-6T ( = MCC 2184T =DSM 27472T) as type strain of the species.
    International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology. 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background The human gut microbiome is important for maintaining the health status of the host. Clostridia are key members of the human gut microbiome, carrying out several important functions in the gut environment. Hence understanding the role of different Clostridium species isolated from human gut is essential. The present study was aimed at investigating the role of novel Clostridium sp. isolate BL8 in human gut using genome sequencing as a tool. Findings: The genome analysis of Clostridium sp. BL8 showed the presence of several adaptive features like bile resistance, presence of sensory and regulatory systems, presence of oxidative stress managing systems and presence of membrane transport systems. The genome of Clostridium sp. BL8 consists of a wide variety of virulence factors like phospholipase C (alpha toxin), hemolysin, aureolysin and exfoliative toxin A, as well as adhesion factors, proteases, Type IV secretion system and antibiotic resistance genes. In vitro antibiotic sensitivity testing showed that Clostridium sp. BL8 was resistant to 11 different tested antibiotics belonging to 6 different classes. The cell cytotoxicity assay confirmed the cytotoxic effect of Clostridium sp. BL8 cells, which killed 40% of the Vero cells after 4 hrs of incubation. Conclusions Clostridium sp. BL8 has adapted for survival in human gut environment, with presence of different adaptive features. The presence of several virulence factors and cell cytotoxic activity indicate that Clostridium sp. BL8 has a potential to cause infections in humans, however further in vivo studies are necessary to ascertain this fact.
    Gut Pathogens 07/2014; 6:30. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is increasing concern that environmental antibiotic pollution promotes transfer of resistance genes to the human microbiota. Here, fluoroquinolone-polluted river sediment, well water, irrigated farmland, and human fecal flora of local villagers within a pharmaceutical industrial region in India were analyzed for quinolone resistance (qnr) genes by quantitative PCR. Similar samples from Indian villages farther away from industrial areas, as well as fecal samples from Swedish study participants and river sediment from Sweden, were included for comparison. Fluoroquinolones were detected by MS/MS in well water and soil from all villages located within three km from industrially polluted waterways. Quinolone resistance genes were detected in 42% of well water, 7% of soil samples and in 100% and 18% of Indian and Swedish river sediments, respectively. High antibiotic concentrations in Indian sediment coincided with high abundances of qnr, whereas lower fluoroquinolone levels in well water and soil did not. We could not find support for an enrichment of qnr in fecal samples from people living in the fluoroquinolone-contaminated villages. However, as qnr was detected in 91% of all Indian fecal samples (24% of the Swedish) it suggests that the spread of qnr between people is currently a dominating transmission route. ■ INTRODUCTION Environmental pollution with active pharmaceutical ingredients from drug manufacturing has been documented in recent years in different parts of the world. 1−4 The overall consequences of environmental discharge of pharmaceutical waste are not yet completely understood, but it can undoubtedly have effects on local wildlife. 1,5−8 In the case of antibiotics, a growing body of evidence supports the hypothesis that not only an increased use of antibiotics, but also an increased exposure of microbial communities outside of our bodies, contributes to the recruitment and spread of antibiotic resistance genes among human pathogens. 9,10 If the concentrations of antibiotics in the environment reach sufficiently high levels, environmental bacteria carrying resistance genes are expected to increase in abundance, leading to more opportunities for transfer of their genes to bacteria that are able to colonize the human body and possibly cause disease. 11−14
    Environmental Science & Technology 07/2014; · 5.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background The healthy human intestine is represented by the presence of bacterial communities predominantly belonging to obligate anaerobes; however disparity and dysanaerobiosis in intestinal microflora may lead to the progression of ulcerative colitis (UC). The foremost aim of this study is to consider and compare the gut microbiota composition in patients suffering from different stages of UC. Methods This study represents data from the biopsy samples of six individuals suffering from UC. The samples were collected by colonoscopy and were processed immediately for isolation of DNA. Mucosal microbiota was analyzed by means of 16S rRNA gene-based Illumina high throughput sequencing. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was performed to determine total bacterial abundances. Results Analysis of 23,927 OTUs demonstrated a significant reduction of bacterial diversity consistently from phylum to species level (p < 0.05) for individuals suffering from severe stage of UC. Significant increase in abundance of unusual aerobes and facultative anaerobes, including members from the phylum Proteobacteria (p- = 0.031) was also observed. A 10 fold increase in the total bacterial count was detected in patients suffering from severe inflammatory stage (2.98 +/-0.49 E + 09/ml) when compared with patients with moderate (1.03+/-0.29 E + 08/ml) and mild (1.76 +/-0.34 E + 08/ml) stages of inflammation. Conclusion The reduction of bacterial diversity with an increase in the total bacterial count indicates a shift of bacterial communities which signifies dysbiosis and dysanaerobiosis at the mucosal level for patients suffering from UC.
    Gut Pathogens 06/2014; 6(22). · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A novel Gram-stain-positive, spore-forming, aerobic, non-motile, rod-shaped, red-pigmented bacterium designated as strain SD111T was isolated from deep-sea-sediment sample (collected from 5m depth) of Lakshadweep, India. Strain SD111T grew well on seawater- agar at pH 6-10 (optimum 7.5±2). It showed maximum (97.6%) 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and formed monophyletic clade with Domibacillus robiginosus strain WS 4628T (DSM 25058T). Genomic DNA G+C content (mol%) was 37.4% and showed 37.6% DNA-DNA hybridization value with D.robiginosus DSM 25058T. Fatty acid profile of the strain SD111Tcontained C16:0(27.2%), iso-C14:0(13.7%), iso-C16:0(16.9%), iso-C15:0 (5.9%) and anteiso-C15:0(15.8%) as major fatty acids and MK 6 was predominant quinine. The polar lipid profile of strain SD111T consisted of phospholipids (PL1 and PL2), phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG). Cell wall contained meso-diaminopimelicacid (m-Dpm) and A1Ƴ type of peptidoglycan.Glucose and ribose are detected as major cell wall sugars. Results from polyphasic study suggested that strain SD111T is a novel species of the genus Domibacillus for which the name Domibacillus indicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SD111T (=MCC 2255T = DSM 28032T).
    International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology. 06/2014;
  • Avinash Sharma, Yogesh Shouche
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    ABSTRACT: Culture collections are valuable resources for the sustainable use of microbial diversity and its conservation. Advances in biotechnology have further increased their importance and some of these have been recognized as International Depositary Authority (IDA) for the deposition of patent cultures. Microbial Culture Collection at National Centre for Cell Science was established by the Department of Biotechnology, Government of India is country’s newest culture collection with largest holdings. It is recognized as an IDA under the Budapest Treaty and Designated National Repository under the Biodiversity Act 2002. This article describes its various service related activities.
    Indian Journal of Microbiology 06/2014; 54(2). · 0.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Red kidney beans (RKBs) are one of the major components in the human diet of Western Indian Himalaya (WIH). Their cultivation in these habitats is strongly influenced by various biotic and abiotic stresses and therefore, there must be a selection of RKB associated microorganisms that are adapted to these harsh conditions. Seven cold adaptive diazotrophs from the same rhizosphere were isolated in our previous study to reveal the low temperature associated proteins and mechanisms. However, the diversity and phylogenetic affiliations of these rhizosphere diazotrophs are still unknown. In this study, RKB rhizospheric soil from two different agro-ecosystems of WIH namely S1 (Chhiplakot, 30.70°N/80.30°E) and S2 (Munsyari, 30.60°N/80.20°E) were explored for the assessment of nitrogenase reductase gene (nifH) diversity by plating respective clone libraries SN1 and SN2. The RKB rhizosphere diazotroph assemblage was very diverse and apparently consists mainly of the genera Rhizobium, followed by unknown diazotrophic microorganisms. Deduced amino acid sequence analysis revealed the presence of diverse nifH sequences, affiliated with a wide range of taxa, encompassing members of the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Members of cyanobacteria, methanotrophs and archaea were also detected. Similar pattern of diazotrophic diversity observed in both the agro-ecosystems arguing against the hypothesis that there would be differences between the rhizosphere microbial communities of same plant species from different locations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first major metagenomic effort that revealed the presence of diverse nitrogen-fixing microbial assemblages in indigenous RKB rhizospheric soil which can further be explored for improved crop yield/productivity.
    3Biotech. 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We report the first draft genome sequences of the strains of plague-causing bacteria, Yersinia pestis, from India. These include two strains from the Surat epidemic (1994), one strain from the Shimla outbreak (2002) and one strain from the plague surveillance activity in the Deccan plateau region (1998). Genome size for all four strains is *4.49 million bp with 139–147 contigs. Average sequencing depth for all four genomes was 21x.
    Indian Journal of Microbiology 05/2014; · 0.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract A novel actinobacterial strain designated, NIO-1009T was isolated from a marine sediment sample collected from a Chorao Island, Goa, India. Phylogenetic analysis comparison based on 16S rRNA gene sequences with strain NIO-1009T and other members of the Rhodococcus genera reveal that strain NIO-1009T is having closest sequence similarity to Rhodococcus kroppenstedtii DSM 44908T and Rhodococcus corynebacterioides DSM 20151T with 99.2 and 99.1% sequence similarity respectively. Further, DNA-DNA hybridization results however, showed that R. kroppenstedtii DSM 44908T and R. corynebacterioides DSM 20151T were 39.5 (3.0%) and 41.7 (2.0%) with strain NIO-1009T which was well below the 70% limit for any novel species proposal. Phylogenetically strain NIO-1009T forms a stable clade with and R. kroppenstedtii DSM 44908T and R. corynebacterioides DSM 20151T with 100% bootstrap values. Strain NIO-1009T contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid and galactose and arabinose as the cell wall sugars. The major fatty acids were C16:0 (37.0 %), C18:1 ω9c (37.6 %), Sum feature-3 (C16:1 w6c/C16:1 w7c)-(8.4%) and 10-methyl C18:0 (5.2%). The only menaquinone detected was MK-8(H2), while the major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannoside and one unknown phospholipid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 66.9 mol%. The phenotypic and genotypic data showed that strain NIO-1009T warrants recognition as a novel species of the genus Rhodococcus for which the name Rhodococcus enclensis sp. nov., is proposed; the type strain is NIO-1009T (=NCIM 5452T=DSM 45688T).
    International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology. 05/2014;
  • Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2014 (Chicago, U.S.A) published in Gastroenterology, Chicago, USA; 05/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Two coccoid, non-motile, obligate anaerobic, Gram stain negative bacteria mainly single or in pairs, with average size 1.4 - 2.5 μm; designated as NMBHI-10T and BLPYG-7 were isolated from faeces of two different healthy human volunteers aged 26 and 56 years respectively. Both the strains were affiliated to the sub-branch Sporomucosa of the class Clostridia as revealed by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The isolates NMBHI-10T and BLPYG-7 showed 99.1 and 99.2 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity respectively with Megasphaera elsdenii JCM 1772T. DNA-DNA hybridization and phenotypic analysis showed that both the strains were distinct from their closest relative, M. elsdenii JCM 1772T (42 and 53% DNA-DNA relatedness respectively) but belong to the same species (DNA-DNA relatedness of 80.9% between the isolates). According to DNA-DNA hybridization results, the coccoid strains belong to the same genospecies, neither of which was related to any of the known species of Megasphaera. Strains NMBHI-10T and BLPYG-7 grow in PYG broth at temperatures between 15 and 40oC (optimum 37oC) but not at 45oC. The strains utilize a range of carbohydrates as sources of carbon and energy, including glucose, lactose, cellobiose, rhamnose, galactose and sucrose. Glucose fermentation resulted in formation of volatile fatty acids mainly caproic acid and organic acids such as succinic acid. Phylogenetic analysis and specific phenotypic characteristics and/or DNA G+C content also differentiated the strains from each other and from their closest relatives. The G+C content of strain NMBHI-10T and BLPYG-7 is 57.7 and 54.9 mol% respectively. Major fatty acids were 12:0 FAME and 17:0 CYC FAME. On the basis of this data, we propose strains NMBHI-10T and BLPYG-7 be classified as representing a novel species, Megspahaera indica sp. nov. The type strain is NMBHI-10T = (DSM 25563T ).
    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SYSTEMATIC AND EVOLUTIONARY MICROBIOLOGY 04/2014; · 2.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Flesh flies of the genus Sarcophaga (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) are carrion-breeding, necrophagous insects important in medical and veterinary entomology as potential transmitters of pathogens to humans and animals. Our aim was to analyse the diversity of gut-associated bacteria in wild-caught larvae and adult flesh flies using culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences from cultured isolates and clone libraries revealed bacteria affiliated to Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes in the guts of larval and adult flesh flies. Bacteria cultured from larval and adult flesh fly guts belonged to the genera Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Budvicia, Citrobacter, Dermacoccus, Enterococcus, Ignatzschineria, Lysinibacillus, Myroides, Pasteurella, Proteus, Providencia and Staphylococcus. Phylogenetic analysis showed clone sequences of the genera Aeromonas, Bacillus, Bradyrhizobium, Citrobacter, Clostridium, Corynebacterium, Ignatzschineria, Klebsiella, Pantoea, Propionibacterium, Proteus, Providencia, Serratia, Sporosarcina, Weissella and Wohlfahrtiimonas. Species of clinically significant genera such as Ignatzschineria and Wohlfahrtiimonas spp. were detected in both larvae and adult flesh flies. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries supported culture-based results and revealed the presence of additional bacterial taxa. This study determined the diversity of gut microbiota in flesh flies, which will bolster the ability to assess microbiological risk associated with the presence of these flies. The present data thereby establish a platform for a much larger study.
    Medical and Veterinary Entomology 04/2014; · 2.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bacterial community structure was analyzed from coastal water of Alang-Sosiya ship breaking yard (ASSBY), world's largest ship breaking yard, near Bhavnagar, using 16S rRNA gene sequencing (cultured dependent and culture independent). In clone libraries, total 2324 clones were retrieved from seven samples (coastal water of ASSBY for three seasons along with one pristine coastal water) which were grouped in 525 operational taxonomic units. Proteobacteria was found to be dominant in all samples. In pristine samples, Gammaproteobacteria was found to be dominant, whereas in polluted samples dominancy of Gammaproteobacteria has shifted to Betaproteobacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria. Richness and diversity indices also indicated that bacterial community in pristine sample was the most diverse followed by summer, monsoon and winter samples. To the best of knowledge, this is the first study describing bacterial community structure from coastal water of ASSBY, and it suggests that seasonal fluctuation and anthropogenic pollutions alters the bacterial community structure.
    Bioresource Technology 03/2014; 161C:362-370. · 5.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) is a rapid, robust, inexpensive and simple tool for microbial community profiling. Methods used for DNA extraction, PCR amplification and digestion of amplified products have a considerable impact on the results of T-RFLP. Pitfalls of the method skew the similarity analysis and compromise its high throughput ability. Despite a high throughput method of data generation, data analysis is still in its infancy and needs more attention. Current article highlights the limitations of the methods used for data generation and analysis. It also provides an overview of the recent methodological developments in T-RFLP which will assist the readers in obtaining real and authentic profiles of the microbial communities under consideration while eluding the inherent biases and technical difficulties.
    Indian Journal of Microbiology 03/2014; · 0.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Wild Indigo (Tephrosia purpurea (L.) Pers.) grows as a common weed throughout the Indian subcontinent. The plant has pinnate leaves, white or purplish flowers and flat hairy pods and is cultivated as a green manure crop. The plant extracts contain compounds, such as Tephrosin (1), an aromatic ester, prenylated flavonoid and Sesquiterpene (2) that have medicinal properties. The newly recognized disease, Tephrosia purpurea witches’ broom (TPWB), was characterized by chlorosis, stunting and proliferative branching which were suggestive of phytoplasma infection during a field survey conducted in November 2013.
    Plant Disease 01/2014; · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A Gram negative, non-motile, non- spore-forming, coccoid bacterium was isolated from stool sample of healthy human subject and formed cream colour colonies on tryptic soy agar. Almost complete length (1500 bp) small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene sequence was generated and similarity search was conducted by BLAST. Result of similarity search indicated that bacterium belongs to [beta]- subclass of Proteobacteria of family Alacaligenaceae. It showed maximum sequence similarity (96.5%) with Pelistega europea CCUG 39967T followed by Advenella mimigardefordensis DSM 17166T (96.1%) and Taylorella assinigenitalis LMG 19572T (95.15%). DNA G+C content of strain HM-7T was 42 mol%. Strain HM-7T contained 14:0 (4.2%), 16:0 (18.6%), 16:0 3 OH (3.0%), and 18:0 (1.7%) as dominant fatty acids. Morphological, physiological and biochemical data also showed that strain HM-7T belongs to genus Pelistega, but at the same time it delineates with Pelistega europaea CCUG 39967T the only existing species of the genus. Based on polyphasic characterization we concluded that bacterium is a new species of genus Pelistega and proposed as Pelistega indica sp. nov. with strain HM-7T as type strain of the species (= MCC 2184T = DSM 27484T).
    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SYSTEMATIC AND EVOLUTIONARY MICROBIOLOGY 01/2014; · 2.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mammalian gut is inhabited by a complex and highly diverse population of bacteria. About 100 trillion microbes are present in the human gut, a number ten times more than the total number of cells in an adult human body. These microorganisms play an important role in several fundamental and crucial processes such as immunity, digestion, synthesis of vitamins, and metabolizing bile acids, sterols, and xenobiotics in the host, thereby influencing human health. Identification and manipulation of these metabolic interfaces is therefore critical. Here, we present a set of methods for manipulation and targeting the 16S rRNA based identification of rodent gut microbiota using Sanger's and next-generation sequencing platforms. Novel methods for manipulation of gut microbiota are also presented. In principle, these methods can be easily adapted to most rodent models for successful screening and manipulation of gut microbiome, to generate a better understanding of their role in metabolic disease.
    Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) 01/2014; 1194:449-469. · 1.29 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
470.45 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1998–2014
    • National Centre For Cell Science, Pune
      • Molecular Biology Laboratory
      Poona, Mahārāshtra, India
  • 1997–2014
    • University of Pune
      Poona, Mahārāshtra, India
  • 2012
    • Goa University
      Nova Goa, Goa, India
  • 2010–2012
    • National Institute of Oceanography
      • Division of Biological Oceanography (NIO)
      Nova Goa, Goa, India
  • 2011
    • Modern College Pune
      Poona, Mahārāshtra, India
    • Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University
      • Department of Microbial Biotechnology
      Pune, State of Maharashtra, India
  • 2009–2011
    • Indian Institute of Technology Madras
      • Department of Biotechnology
      Chennai, State of Tamil Nadu, India
    • Panjab University
      • Department of Biotechnology
      Chandīgarh, Union Territory of Chandigarh, India
  • 2006–2011
    • Sardar Patel University
      • Department of Statistics
      Vallabh Vidhyanagar, Gujarāt, India
    • Gulbarga University
      Kulbarga, Karnātaka, India
  • 2008
    • South Dakota School of Mines and Technology
      Rapid City, South Dakota, United States
    • Natural History Museum, London
      • Department of Zoology
      London, ENG, United Kingdom
    • Aligarh Muslim University
      Koil, Uttar Pradesh, India
    • G. B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar
      • Department of Microbiology
      Uttarkāshi, Uttarakhand, India