Henrike Fleige

Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Lower Saxony, Germany

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Publications (5)63.12 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Ectopic lymphoid tissue, such as bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) in the lung, develops spontaneously at sites of chronic inflammation or during infection. The molecular mechanisms underlying the neogenesis of such tertiary lymphoid tissue are still poorly understood. We show that the type of inflammation-inducing pathogen determines which key factors are required for the formation and maturation of BALT. Thus, a single intranasal administration of the poxvirus modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is sufficient to induce highly organized BALT with densely packed B cell follicles containing a network of CXCL13-expressing follicular DCs (FDCs), as well as CXCL12-producing follicular stromal cells. In contrast, mice treated with P. aeruginosa (P.a.) develop BALT but B cell follicles lack FDCs while still harboring CXCL12-positive follicular stromal cells. Furthermore, in IL-17-deficient mice, P.a.-induced BALT largely lacks B cells as well as CXCL12-expressing stromal cells, and only loose infiltrates of T cells are present. We show that Toll-like receptor pathways are required for BALT induction by P.a., but not MVA, and provide evidence that IL-17 drives the differentiation of lung stroma toward podoplanin-positive CXCL12-expressing cells that allow follicle formation even in the absence of FDCs. Taken together, our results identify distinct pathogen-dependent induction and maturation pathways for BALT formation.
    Journal of Experimental Medicine 03/2014; · 13.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: αβ T-cell development and selection proceed while thymocytes successively migrate through distinct regions of the thymus. For γδ T cells, the interplay of intrathymic migration and cell differentiation is less well understood. Here, we crossed C-C chemokine receptor (CCR)7- deficient (Ccr7(-/-) ) and CCR9-deficient mice (Ccr9(-/-) ) to mice with a TcrdH2BeGFP reporter background to investigate the impact of thymic localization on γδ T-cell development. γδ T-cell frequencies and numbers were decreased in CCR7-deficient and increased in CCR9-deficient mice. Transfer of CCR7- or CCR9-deficient bone marrow into irradiated C57BL/6 wild type recipients reproduced these phenotypes pointing towards cell-intrinsic migration defects. Monitoring recent thymic emigrants by intrathymic labeling allowed us to identify decreased thymic γδ T-cell output in CCR7-deficient mice. In vitro, CCR7-deficient precursors showed normal γδ T-cell development. Immunohistology revealed that CCR7 and CCR9 expression was important for γδ T-cell localization within thymic medulla or cortex, respectively. However, γδ T-cell motility was unaltered in CCR7- or CCR9-deficient thymi. Together, our results suggest that proper intrathymic localization is important for normal γδ T-cell development. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    European Journal of Immunology 02/2014; · 4.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mouse CMV (MCMV) infection rapidly induces the proliferation of NK cells, which correlates with immunological protection. Whether NK cells primed during acute response against MCMV are maintained for the long term is not known. In this study, we used TcrdH2BeGFP mice in which maturing NK cells are genetically labeled with a pulse of very stable histone-2B-eGFP. In this system, we found that the reporter protein was diluted out upon NK cell division during acute MCMV infection. At the same time, mature NK cells in uninfected mice showed only very limited turnover in vivo. Three months after primary infection when MCMV latency was established, the majority of peripheral NK cells still displayed a higher record of proliferation than NK cells in mock-infected controls. This observation included both Ly49H(+) and Ly49H(-) NK cells. Conversely, naive NK cells did not show more proliferation after transfer into latently MCMV-infected mice than that after transfer into mock-infected control mice. This indicated that the observed alterations of the NK cell compartment in MCMV latency were "legacy" (i.e., resulting from prior events during the initial immune response). Together, these results suggest that antiviral immune responses induce sustained alterations of innate lymphocyte populations that extend far beyond the first days of acute infection.
    The Journal of Immunology 03/2011; 186(5):2918-25. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    Nature Immunology 01/2011; 13(1):1; author reply 2. · 26.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mucosal vaccination via the respiratory tract can elicit protective immunity in animal infection models, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. We show that a single intranasal application of the replication-deficient modified vaccinia virus Ankara, which is widely used as a recombinant vaccination vector, results in prominent induction of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT). Although initial peribronchiolar infiltrations, characterized by the presence of dendritic cells (DCs) and few lymphocytes, can be found 4 d after virus application, organized lymphoid structures with segregated B and T cell zones are first observed at day 8. After intratracheal application, in vitro-differentiated, antigen-loaded DCs rapidly migrate into preformed BALT and efficiently activate antigen-specific T cells, as revealed by two-photon microscopy. Furthermore, the lung-specific depletion of DCs in mice that express the diphtheria toxin receptor under the control of the CD11c promoter interferes with BALT maintenance. Collectively, these data identify BALT as tertiary lymphoid structures supporting the efficient priming of T cell responses directed against unrelated airborne antigens while crucially requiring DCs for its sustained presence.
    Journal of Experimental Medicine 11/2009; 206(12):2593-601. · 13.21 Impact Factor