Jia Park

Kyungpook National University, Daikyū, Daegu, South Korea

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Publications (3)3.34 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Our previous proteomic study demonstrated that oxidative stress and antioxidant delphinidin regulated the cellular level of p27(kip1) (referred to as p27) as well as some heat shock proteins in human colon cancer HT 29 cells. Current study was conducted to validate and confirm the regulation of these proteins using both in vitro and in vivo systems. The level of p27 was decreased by hydrogen peroxide in a dose-dependent manner in human colon carcinoma HCT 116 (p53-positive) cells while it was increased upon exposure to hydrogen peroxide in HT 29 (p53-negative) cells. However, high concentration of hydrogen peroxide (100 µM) downregulated p27 in both cell lines, but delphindin, one of antioxidative anthocyanins, enhanced the level of p27 suppressed by 100 µM hydrogen peroxide. ICR mice were injected with varying concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, delphinidin and both. Western blot analysis for the mouse large intestinal tissue showed that the expression of p27 was upregulated by 25 mg/kg BW hydrogen peroxide. To investigate the association of p27 regulation with hypoxia-inducible factor 1-beta (HIF-1β), the level of p27 was analyzed in wild-type mouse hepatoma hepa1c1c7 and Aryl Hydrocarbon Nuclear Translocator (arnt, HIF-1β)-defective mutant BPRc1 cells in the absence and presence of hydrogen peroxide and delphinidin. While the level of p27 was responsive to hydrogen peroxide and delphinidin, it remained unchanged in BPRc1, suggesting that the regulation of p27 requires functional HIF-1β. We also found that hydrogen peroxide and delphinidin affected PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway which is one of upstream regulators of HIFs. In conclusion, hydrogen peroxide and antioxidant delphinidin seem to regulate intracellular level of p27 through regulating HIF-1 level which is, in turn, governed by its upstream regulators comprising of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. The results should also encourage further study for the potential of p27 as a biomarker for intracellular oxidative or antioxidant status.
    Nutrition research and practice 10/2010; 4(5):351-5. · 0.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our previous study demonstrated that methanolic extract of Chrysanthemum zawadskii Herbich var. latilobum Kitamura (Compositae) has the potential to induce detoxifying enzymes such as NAD(P)H:(quinone acceptor) oxidoreductase 1 (EC 1.6.99.2) (NQO1, QR) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). In this study we further fractionated methanolic extract of Chrysanthemum zawadskii and investigated the detoxifying enzyme-inducing potential of each fraction. The fraction (CZ-6) shown the highest QR-inducing activity was found to contain (+)-(3S,4S,5R,8S)-(E)-8-acetoxy-4-hydroxy-3-isovaleroyloxy-2-(hexa-2,4-diynyliden)-1,6-dioxaspiro [4,5] decane and increased QR enzyme activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, CZ-6 fraction caused a dose-dependent enhancement of luciferase activity in HepG2-C8 cells generated by stably transfecting antioxidant response element-luciferase gene construct, suggesting that it induces antioxidant/detoxifying enzymes through antioxidant response element (ARE)-mediated transcriptional activation of the relevant genes. Although CZ-6 fraction failed to induce hepatic QR in mice over the control, it restored QR activity suppressed by CCl(4) treatment to the control level. Hepatic injury induced by CCl(4) was also slightly protected by pretreatment with CZ-6. In conclusion, although CZ-6 fractionated from methanolic extract of Chrysanthemum zawadskii did not cause a significant QR induction in mice organs such as liver, kidney, and stomach, it showed protective effect from liver damage caused by CCl(4).
    Nutrition research and practice 04/2010; 4(2):93-8. · 0.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our previous study demonstrated that methanolic extract of Inula helenium (Elecampane) has the potential to induce detoxifying enzymes such as NAD(P)H:(quinone acceptor) oxidoreductase 1 (EC 1.6.99.2) (NQO1, QR) activity and glutathione S-transferase (GST) and found isoalantolactone and alantolactone as the active components. In this study we investigated the detoxifying enzyme-inducing potential of isoalantolactone, which is present in I. helenium and has a structure similar to that of alantolactone. The compound induced QR in a dose-dependent manner in both Hepa1c1c7 cells and its mutant BPRc1 cells lacking the arylhydrocarbon receptor translocator. Like with most phase 2 enzyme inducers, other phase 2 detoxifying enzymes, including GST, glutathione reductase, gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, and heme oxygenase-1, were also induced by isoalantolactone in a dose-dependent manner in the cultured cells. Furthermore, isoalantolactone caused a proportionate increase in luciferase activity depending upon concentration and exposure time in the reporter assay in which HepG2-C8 cells, transfectants carrying antioxidant response element-luciferase gene, were used. The nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was stimulated by the compound and attenuated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors such as LY294002 and wortmannin. In conclusion, isoalantolactone is a candidate for chemoprevention and acts as potent phase 2 enzyme inducer by stimulating the accumulation of Nrf2 in the nucleus.
    Journal of medicinal food 10/2009; 12(5):1038-45. · 1.39 Impact Factor