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Publications (3)12.69 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Epirubicin, an anthracycline antitumor drug, often causes vascular injury such as vascular pain, phlebitis, and necrotizing vasculitis. However, an effective prevention for the epirubicin-induced vascular injury has not been established. The purpose of this study is to identify the mechanisms of cell injury induced by epirubicin in porcine aorta endothelial cells (PAECs). PAECs were exposed to epirubicin for 10 min followed by further incubation without epirubicin. The exposure to epirubicin (3-30 μM) decreased the cell viability concentration and time dependently. Epirubicin increased the activity of caspase-3/7, apoptotic cells, and intracellular lipid peroxide levels, and also induced depolarization of mitochondrial membranes. These intracellular events were reversed by glutathione (GSH) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), while epirubicin rather increased intracellular GSH slightly and L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine, a specific inhibitor of GSH synthesis, had no effect on the epirubicin-induced cell injury. The epirubicin-induced cell injury and increase of caspase-3/7 activity were also attenuated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors, SB203580 and PD169316. Moreover, epirubicin significantly enhanced the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, and these effects were attenuated by GSH and NAC. In contrast, a c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125, an extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor PD98059, and a p53 inhibitor pifithrin α did not affect the epirubicin-induced cell injury and increase of caspase-3/7 activity. These results indicate that an activation of p38 MAPK by oxidative stress is involved in the epirubicin-induced endothelial cell injury.
    Free Radical Biology and Medicine 02/2012; 52(8):1285-93. · 5.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Anticancer drugs are classified as vesicant, irritant, and nonvesicant drugs on the basis of frequency of their vascular disorder. In this study, we compared the injuring effects of three typical anticancer drugs of each class on porcine aorta endothelial cells (PAECs). The concentration inducing 50% cell viability inhibition was lower in the order of vesicant, irritant, and nonvesicant drugs. These results suggest that injuring effects of anticancer drugs on PAECs may be relevant as an indicator of frequency of their vascular disorder, and that this experimental model may be useful for the study of vascular disorder.
    Journal of Pharmacological Sciences 09/2011; 117(2):125-8. · 2.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Vinorelbine (VNR), a vinca alkaloid anticancer drug, often causes vascular injury such as venous irritation, vascular pain, phlebitis, and necrotizing vasculitis. The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanisms that mediate the cell injury induced by VNR in porcine aorta endothelial cells (PAECs). PAECs were exposed to VNR for 10 min followed by further incubation in serum-free medium without VNR. The exposure to VNR (0.3-30 microM) decreased the cell viability concentration and time dependently. The incidence of apoptotic cells significantly increased at 12 h after transient exposure to VNR. At the same time, VNR increased the activity of caspases. Interestingly, VNR rapidly depleted intracellular glutathione (GSH) and increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Moreover, VNR depolarized the mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased cellular ATP levels. These VNR-induced cell abnormalities were almost completely inhibited by GSH and N-acetylcysteine. On the other hand, L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine, a specific inhibitor of GSH synthesis, aggravated the VNR-induced loss of cell viability. These results clearly demonstrate that VNR induces oxidative stress by depleting intracellular GSH and increasing ROS production in PAECs, and oxidative stress plays an important role in the VNR-induced cell injury.
    Free Radical Biology and Medicine 10/2009; 48(1):120-7. · 5.27 Impact Factor