M Troiano

University of Rome Tor Vergata, Roma, Latium, Italy

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Publications (13)40.78 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The information regarding the probability of finding a matched unrelated donor (MUD) within a relatively short time is crucial for the success of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), particularly in patients with malignancies. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed 315 Italian patients who started a search for a MUD, in order to assess the distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and haplotypes in this population of patients and to evaluate the probability of finding a donor. Comparing two groups of patients based on whether or not a 10/10 HLA-matched donor was available, we found that patients who had a fully-matched MUD possessed at least one frequent haplotype more often than the others (45.6% vs 14.3%; P = 0.000003). In addition, analysis of data pertaining to the HLA class I alleles distribution showed that, in the first group of patients, less common alleles were under-represented (20.2% vs 40.0%; P = 0.006). Therefore, the presence of less frequent alleles represents a negative factor for the search for a potential compatible donor being successful, whereas the presence of one frequent haplotype represents a positive predictive factor. Antigenic differences between patient and donor observed at C and DQB1 loci, were mostly represented by particular B/C or DRB1/DQB1 allelic associations. Thus, having a particular B or DRB1 allele, linked to multiple C or DQB1 alleles, respectively, might be considered to be associated with a lower probability of a successful search. Taken together, these data may help determine in advance the probability of finding a suitable unrelated donor for an Italian patient.
    Tissue Antigens 04/2014; · 2.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The novel allele HLA-DQB1*04:09 differs from DQB1*04:02:01 by three nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions in exon 2.
    Tissue Antigens 09/2013; 82(3):215-6. · 2.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing was done in 426 Lebanese subjects of 88 families, in which 347 haplotypes were identified. The A, B, C, DRB1, DRB3/4/5, DQB1 and DPB1 loci were typed at high resolution. This study shows that information theory, as originally developed by Claude Shannon in 1948, provides a promising theoretical foundation to study the population genetics of a genetic system like HLA. Although Lebanese carry HLA alleles found in other populations, the association of these alleles into haplotypes is quite unique. Comparisons are made with the main ethnic groups. Two haplotypes well represented in the Lebanese population are not identified in any global population: L1 = {A*26:01:01 - B*35:01:01:01- C*04:01:01:01- DRB1*16:01:01 - DRB5*02:02 - DQB1*05:02:01} and L2 = {A*02:02 - B*41:01- C*17:01:01:01 -DRB1*11:04:01 - DRB3*02:02:01:01- DQB1*03:01:01:01}. By studying linkage disequilibrium in two blocks at a time, with the division of the blocks at different levels in consecutive cycles, conserved haplotypes in full linkage disequilibrium come to light, such as {A*26:01:01- B*35:01:01:01 - C*04:01:01:01 - DRB1*16:01:01 - DRB5*02:02 - DQB1*05:02:01- DPB1*03:01:01} and {A*33:01:01 - B*14:02:01 - C*08:02:01 - DRB1*01:02:01- DQB1*05:01:01:01 - DPB1*04:01:01:01}.
    Tissue Antigens 10/2012; 80(4):341-55. · 2.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Polymorphisms in the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of HLA-G, an important player in immunological tolerance, could be involved in post-transcriptional expression control, and their association with different clinical immune-related conditions including autoimmunity and transplantation is of mounting interest. Most studies have focused on a 14 base pair (bp) insertion/deletion (ins/del), while additional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the HLA-G 3'UTR have been described but not extensively investigated for their clinical relevance. Here we have comparatively studied the association between 3'UTR haplotypes of HLA-G, or the 14 bp ins/del, with clinical outcome of HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 147 Middle Eastern beta-thalassemia patients. Sequence based typing of 3'UTR HLA-G polymorphisms in the patients and in 102 healthy Italian blood donors showed strong linkage disequilibrium between the 14 bp ins/del and five 3'UTR SNPs, which together could be arranged into eight distinct haplotypes based on expectation-maximization studies, with four predominant haplotypes (UTRs1-4). After HSCT, we found a moderate though not significant association between the presence of UTR-2 in double dose and protection from acute graft versus host disease (hazard ratio (HR) 0.45, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.14-1.45; P = 0.18), an effect that was also seen when the corresponding 14 bp ins/ins genotype was considered alone (HR 0.42, 95% CI: 0.16-1.06; P = 0.07). No association was found with rejection or survival. Taken together, our data show that there is no apparent added value of considering entire 3'UTR HLA-G haplotypes for risk prediction after allogeneic HSCT for beta-thalassemia.
    Tissue Antigens 05/2012; 79(5):326-32. · 2.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The new allele shows one nucleotide change from C*07:02:01:01 at 351 nt from C to A, resulting in an amino acid change at codon 93 of exon 3 from H to Q.
    Tissue Antigens 03/2012; 80(1):67-8. · 2.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The novel HLA-C allele C*06:58 shows one nucleotide change from C*06:02:01:01 at nt 366 from G to A, resulting in an amino acid change at codon 98 of exon 3 from Met to Ile.
    Tissue Antigens 07/2011; 79(1):80-1. · 2.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I sequence-based typing (SBT) for hematopoietic unrelated donor searching in an Italian Caucasian patient showed the presence of a novel HLA-A allele defined as A*31:48. HLA-A*31:48 has one nucleotide change from A*31:01:02 at nt 727 from C to T, resulting in an amino acid change at codon 219 of exon 4 from Arg to Trp.
    Tissue Antigens 05/2011; 78(4):286-7. · 2.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The study of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), allele and haplotype frequencies within populations provides an important source of information for anthropological investigation, organ and hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation purposes as well as disease association studies. As of today, there are no data available in the literature on the HLA structure of the Maldivian population. Altogether 106 families were studied. We used the parents of each family (212 unrelated individuals) to analyze the frequencies of HLA class I and class II allele groups and haplotypes.
    Tissue Antigens 03/2011; 77(3):235-8. · 2.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: HLA testing is an essential part of the process to identify a donor who may be a good match for the patients who need haematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow, peripheral blood or cord blood and the DNA typing in high resolution is now recommended as the Scientific Societies also describe in their standards. Recently the new PCR-Luminex HLA typing method, based on the reverse sequence specific oligonucleotide probes coupled with a microsphere beads in an array platform, has been well established. We report the data from 146 samples previously typed to a four digits level and used to evaluate the accuracy, sensitivity and performance of the new high definition DRB1 by PCR-Luminex kit. One hundred and forty-six samples from unrelated healthy donors, haematological patients or external proficiency tests were used in this study. The Luminex high definition DRB1 typing represents a versatile method and may be easily introduced in the routine, particularly when the technical team has already acquired experience on the technique. Only few HLA allelic combinations need an additional typing by PCR-SSP or SBT to solve the ambiguous results thus reducing the time necessary to produce a final report.
    Molecular Biology Reports 03/2011; 39(1):13-6. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Persistent mixed chimerism represents a state in which recipient and donor cells stably co-exist after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, since in most of the studies reported in literature the engraftment state was observed in the nucleated cells, in this study we determined the donor origin of the mature erythrocytes of patients with persistent mixed chimerism after transplantation for hemoglobinopathies. Results were compared with the engraftment state observed in singly picked out burst-forming unit - erythroid colonies and in the nucleated cells collected from the peripheral blood and from the bone marrow. The donor origin of the erythrocytes was determined analyzing differences on the surface antigens of the erythrocyte suspension after incubation with anti-ABO and/or anti-C, -c, -D, -E and -e monoclonal antibodies by a flow cytometer. Analysis of short tandem repeats was used to determine the donor origin of nucleated cells and burst-forming unit - erythroid colonies singly picked out after 14 days of incubation. The proportions of donor-derived nucleated cells in four transplanted patients affected by hemoglobinopathies were 71%, 46%, 15% and 25% at day 1364, 1385, 1314 and 932, respectively. Similar results were obtained for the erythroid precursors, analyzing the donor/recipient origin of the burst-forming unit - erythroid colonies. In contrast, on the same days of observation, the proportions of donor-derived erythrocytes in the four patients with persistent mixed chimerism were 100%, 100%, 73% and 90%. Conclusions Our results showed that most of the erythrocytes present in four long-term transplanted patients affected by hemoglobinopathies and characterized by the presence of few donor engrafted nucleated cells were of donor origin. The indication that small proportions of donor engrafted cells might be sufficient for clinical control of the disease in patients affected by hemoglobinopathies is relevant, although the biological mechanisms underlying these observations need further investigation.
    Haematologica 10/2010; 96(1):128-33. · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hepcidin is a 25-amino acid peptide, derived from cleavage of an 84 amino acid pro-peptide produced predominantly by hepatocytes. This molecule, encoded by the hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (HAMP) gene shows structural and functional properties consistent with a role in innate immunity. Moreover, as demonstrated in mice and humans, hepcidin is a major regulator of iron metabolism, and acts by binding to ferroportin and controlling its concentration and trafficking. In this study we investigated the influence that mutations in HAMP and/or hemocromatosis (HFE) genes might exert on iron metabolism in a group of poly-transfused thalassemic patients in preparation for bone marrow transplantation. Our results showed that the presence of the c.-582 A>G polymorphism (rs10421768) placed in HAMP promoter (HAMP-P) might play a role in iron metabolism, perhaps varying the transcriptional activation that occurs through E-boxes located within the promoter.
    Haematologica 10/2009; 94(9):1293-6. · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: New allele B*0769 showed one nucleotide difference with B*0732 at codon 272 (TTC-->TGC).
    Tissue Antigens 06/2009; 74(3):252-3. · 2.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Quantitative different red cells/nucleated cells chimerism in patients with long-term hemopoietic persistent mixed chimerism after bone marrow transplantation for hemoglobinopathies. Haematologica. 2010; 95:xxx doi:10.3324/haematol.2010.031013 Publisher's Disclaimer. E-publishing ahead of print is increasingly important for the rapid dissemination of science. Haematologica is, therefore, E-publishing PDF files of an early version of manuscripts that have completed a regular peer review and have been accepted for publication. E-publishing of this PDF file has been approved by the authors. After having E-published Ahead of Print, manuscripts will then undergo technical and English editing, typesetting, proof correction and be presented for the authors' final approval; the final version of the manuscript will then appear in print on a regular issue of the journal. All legal disclaimers that apply to the journal also pertain to this production process. Haematologica (pISSN: 0390-6078, eISSN: 1592-8721, NLM ID: 0417435, www.haemato-logica.org) publishes peer-reviewed papers across all areas of experimental and clinical hematology. The journal is owned by the Ferrata Storti Foundation, a non-profit organiza-tion, and serves the scientific community with strict adherence to the principles of open access publishing (www.doaj.org). In addition, the journal makes every paper published immediately available in PubMed Central (PMC), the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature.

Publication Stats

32 Citations
40.78 Total Impact Points

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Institutions

  • 2009–2013
    • University of Rome Tor Vergata
      Roma, Latium, Italy