J B Wade

Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, United States

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Publications (18)90.37 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A total of 64 elderly individuals presenting with cognitive decline were administered a test of general intelligence and a measure of adaptive knowledge and daily living skills. Premorbid ability was estimated using a demographic formula and a reading test. After controlling for age and depression, general intellectual ability accounted for a large amount of the variance in a broad range of adaptive knowledge and behavioral skills, reflecting the influence of premorbid ability and especially estimated decline. Different patterns of adaptive knowledge and skills were identified as a function of measured IQ and of estimated decline in IQ. Results suggest a threshold of intellectual decline for deterioration in daily living skills. Studies purporting to demonstrate that impairments in particular neuropsychological domains predict specific functional deficits need to control for general intellectual ability and/or the extent of intellectual decline.
    The Clinical Neuropsychologist 09/2009; 24(1):80-94. · 1.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Psychologic status is associated with poor outcome after knee arthroplasty yet little is known about which specific psychologic disorders or pain-related beliefs contribute to poor outcome. To enhance the therapeutic effect of a psychologic intervention, the specific disorders or pain-related beliefs that contributed to poor outcome should be identified. We therefore determined whether specific psychologic disorders (ie, depression, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder) or health-related beliefs (ie, self-efficacy, pain catastrophizing, fear of movement) are associated with poor outcome after knee arthroplasty. We conducted a cohort study of 140 patients undergoing knee arthroplasty at two hospitals. Patients completed a series of psychologic measures, provided various sociodemographic data, and were followed for 6 months. Patients were dichotomized to groups with either a favorable or a poor outcome using WOMAC pain and function scores and evidence-based approaches. After adjusting for confounding variables, we found pain catastrophizing was the only consistent psychologic predictor of poor WOMAC pain outcome. No psychologic predictors were associated consistently with poor WOMAC function outcome. An intervention focusing on pain catastrophizing seems to have potential for improving pain outcome in patients prone to catastrophizing pain. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level I, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 08/2009; 468(3):798-806. · 2.79 Impact Factor
  • Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 01/2009; 17. · 4.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present descriptive data for alternate forms of clustered and unclustered word list recall in 102 healthy elderly adults and test results for 11 patients with Parkinson's disease. The word list test provided a relatively stable measure of verbal memory. Alternate forms were equivalent except for a tendency of the unclustered list of Form 1 to be easier than those of the other three forms. Verbal intelligence, total word recall, and the ability to cluster related words at recall were related significantly. There were modest effects of education on word recall; female subjects tended to recall more words than males.
    Journal of Clinical Psychology 02/2006; 48(3):341 - 354. · 2.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), patients with Major Depression (MD) and normal control (NC) subjects were administered a continuous performance test (CPT) under neutral and incentive conditions. Patients made more errors than NC subjects with the MD group making a disproportionately large number of omission errors and the PD group tending to make commission errors. Incentive reduced errors across groups. Reaction times were slowest in the MD group. The pattern of findings in patients with MD is consistent with a failure of effort-demanding cognitive processes. In contrast, nondemented patients with PD appeared to have deficiencies in executive control. A previously reported paradoxical effect of incentive on recognition memory performance in depressed patients did not generalize to a vigilance task.
    Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology 03/1998; 20(1):111-7. · 2.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A four-stage model of pain processing was proposed, consisting of pain sensation intensity, pain unpleasantness (stage 1 affect), suffering (stage 2 affect), and pain behavior. We studied 506 chronic pain patients (230 male and 276 female) using a multivariate statistical technique (LISREL) in order to demonstrate the structural relationship among multiple indicators of pain processing; and to characterize these stages in terms of their interactions. A strong relationship was revealed between the majority of the underlying indicators of each pain processing stage. A linear stage sequence best fitted the relationship between the four stages. Successive stages did not have recursive effects on earlier pain components. A confirmatory LISREL analysis was conducted with an additional sample of 502 chronic pain patients. In this replication analysis the structural equation model consisted of pain intensity, unpleasantness (stage 1 affect), emotional suffering (stage 2 affect), and pain behavior. This study extends the validation of these pain dimensions, as well as the validity of the measure(s) of each separate stage.
    Pain 12/1996; 68(1):157-67. · 5.64 Impact Factor
  • J B Wade, R P Hart, L M Dougherty
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    ABSTRACT: This study was undertaken to clarify factors associated with severity of tardive dyskinesia (TD). It was hypothesized that dopaminergic changes associated with neuroleptic medication may interact with unknown vulnerabilities contributing to the manifestation of TD. Fifty-four psychiatric patients residing on the acute and intermediate care wards of a Veterans Administration hospital participated. Thirty schizophrenic and 24 manic patients, under 60 years of age, were assessed for TD using the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale. Cognitive tests were used to form verbal and nonverbal composite indices. The results of multiple regression analyses revealed a modest linear relationship between TD and nonverbal function (p < .03) after controlling for duration of hospitalization, years of illness, motor speed, and age. This relationship was noted for both manic and schizophrenic patients. The results of this study suggest that nonverbal dysfunction is related to severity of TD.
    Brain and Cognition 09/1993; 23(1):71-80. · 2.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The relationship between neuroticism and extraversion on the 4 major stages of pain processing, that of pain sensation intensity, pain unpleasantness, suffering, and pain behavior, were studied in 205 chronic pain patients (88 male and 117 female). Patients underwent psychological evaluation which included the Pain Experience visual analogue scales (VAS) (Price et al. 1983), NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI) (Costa and McCrae 1985), and the Psychosocial Pain Inventory (PPI) (Getto and Heaton 1980). Canonical correlation was used to control for pain sensation intensity in evaluating affective dimensions of pain and to control for neuroticism in assessing effects of extraversion on different stages and dimensions of pain. Neither neuroticism nor extraversion were related to pain sensation intensity. Only neuroticism was associated with pain unpleasantness. Personality factors had their greatest impact on stages 3 (suffering) and 4 (illness behavior) of pain processing. The results of multiple regression analyses indicated that life-long vulnerability to anxiety and depression is paramount in understanding the relationship between personality and suffering in chronic pain. These findings provide support for the idea that personality traits influence the ways in which people cognitively process the meanings that chronic pain holds for their life, and hence the extent to which they suffer.
    Pain 11/1992; 51(1):67-73. · 5.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present descriptive data for alternate forms of clustered and unclustered word list recall in 102 healthy elderly adults and test results for 11 patients with Parkinson's disease. The word list test provided a relatively stable measure of verbal memory. Alternate forms were equivalent except for a tendency of the unclustered list of Form 1 to be easier than those of the other three forms. Verbal intelligence, total word recall, and the ability to cluster related words at recall were related significantly. There were modest effects of education on word recall; female subjects tended to recall more words than males.
    Journal of Clinical Psychology 06/1992; 48(3):341-54. · 2.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fifty-nine chronic pain patients satisfying one of four previously identified pain group classifications were evaluated using the NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI), a standardized measure of normal adult personality structure. Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) pain subgroups differed with respect to level of NEO-PI Neuroticism. In particular, emotionally overwhelmed pain patients as defined by multiple MMPI scale elevations had higher NEO-PI Neuroticism scores. Post hoc analyses revealed higher levels of depression, anxiety, vulnerability, and hostility in emotionally overwhelmed subjects. None of the remaining groups differed from each other on NEO-PI Neuroticism. Additionally, none of the other NEO-PI domains discriminated pain subgroups. NEO-PI profiles for pain patients (except for Neuroticism in emotionally overwhelmed patients) yielded t scores in the average range, suggesting that chronic pain patients present with a relatively normal underlying personality structure.
    Pain 02/1992; 48(1):37-43. · 5.64 Impact Factor
  • James B. Wade, Donald D. Price
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    ABSTRACT: Samenvatting In het hier besproken onderzoek is een poging gedaan om de relatieve bijdrage van frustratie, angst, woede en vrees te bepalen aan de negatieve gevoelens en depressie die patiënten met pijnklachten ervaren. Aan dit onderzoek deden 69 vrouwen en 74 mannen mee; hun gemiddelde leeftijd was 47 jaar. De patiënten kregen een psychologisch onderzoek waarin de volgende componenten vertegenwoordigd waren: de Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (mmpi, een persoonlijkheidsvragenlijst), de Beck Depression Inventory (bdi, een vragenlijst omtrent depressieve gevoelens), en zeven visuele analoge schalen (vas), waarmee de mate van emotionele onlustgevoelens gemeten wordt, de pijnintensiteit, vrees, frustratie, angst, woede en depressie. Test-hertest betrouwbaarheidscoëfficiënten bleken significant te zijn voor de vas met betrekking tot de negatieve gevoelens, waarbij een gemiddelde betrouwbaarheidscoëfficiënt van 0,82 verkregen werd. (Dit betrof de vas voor depressie, vrees, angst, frustratie en woede.)
    Stimulus. 01/1992; 11(3):174-175.
  • J B Wade, R P Hart
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    ABSTRACT: A case is described of a 38-year-old, left-handed female who demonstrated mirror phenomena for both language and non-motor, nonverbal material. She mirror-wrote with her left hand with normal right-hand writing. Mirror-reading as well as object and spatial reversals were revealed. These data are consistent with bilateral representation of visual engrams, with one hemisphere containing a mirror-reversed representation of the other.
    Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology 04/1991; 13(2):299-308. · 2.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Morbid obesity is a serious medical hazard, and effective alternatives to surgery have been unsuccessful. In 1985, the Garren-Edwards Gastric Bubble (GEGB) was offered as an adjunct to dietary and behavioral therapy for weight loss treatment. The safety and efficacy of the GEGB were compared with bariatric surgery, the current standard for the treatment of morbid obesity. Fifty-seven patients received GEGB and 77 underwent bariatric surgery. GEGB patients were divided into two groups: those who attended group therapy and those who did not. This study showed that bariatric surgery was far more effective in reducing excess body weight during a 12-month period compared with the GEGB plus group therapy and the GEGB alone. The morbidity from bariatric surgery was greater than in the GEGB-treated groups, while the cost for uncomplicated cases for a year's treatment was comparable. It is concluded that the GEGB does not offer an effective alternative to bariatric surgery in the treatment of morbid obesity.
    The American surgeon 11/1990; 56(10):575-80. · 0.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study sought to determine the relative contribution of frustration, fear, anger and anxiety, to the unpleasantness and depression pain patients experience. Sixty-nine women and 74 men, with an average age of 47 years, were included. Patients underwent psychological evaluation which included use of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and 7 visual analog scales (VAS) measuring degree of emotional unpleasantness, pain intensity, anxiety, frustration, fear, anger and depression. Test-retest reliability coefficients were significant for the negative feeling VAS yielding an average reliability coefficient of 0.82. Analyses relating the negative feeling state VAS to pain unpleasantness and depression indices from the MMPI (scale 2) and BDI (sum score) yielded significant canonical correlations. Multiple regression was used to clarify the relationships between negative feeling VAS, pain-related unpleasantness, and indices of depression. After statistically controlling for intensity of pain, anxiety and frustration predicted unpleasantness. Regression analyses indicate that anger is an important concomitant of the depression that pain patients experience. The results suggest that anger and frustration are critical concomitants of the pain experience. Treatment techniques specifically targeting anger and frustration in these patients may prove efficacious.
    Pain 04/1990; 40(3):303-10. · 5.64 Impact Factor
  • D F Kirby, J B Wade, P R Mills
    Digestive Diseases 02/1989; 7(3):147-58. · 2.73 Impact Factor
  • Journal of medical education 12/1987; 62(11):940-2.
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with mild dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT), patients with major depression, and normal control subjects completed the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) Digit Symbol test and a measure of incidental memory for the digit-symbol pairs. Mild DAT and depressed patients had equivalent deficits in psychomotor speed, but DAT patients recalled fewer digit-symbol items. Although the standard administration of the Digit Symbol test has limited utility in differential diagnosis, the addition of a brief measure of incidental memory may be clinically useful as part of the battery of neuropsychological tests used to distinguish early dementia from depression. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
    Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 05/1987; 55(2):236-8. · 4.85 Impact Factor
  • J B Wade, R P Hart, C Suter
    The Lancet 08/1986; 2(8498):102-3. · 39.21 Impact Factor