Alissa Basehoar

Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

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Publications (4)17.42 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We have examined mechanisms underlying the formation of pathologic Th17 cells using a transgenic mouse model in which autoreactive CD4(+) T cells recognize influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) as a ubiquitously expressed self-Ag and induce inflammatory arthritis. The lymph nodes of arthritic mice contain elevated numbers of inflammatory monocytes (iMO) with an enhanced capacity to promote CD4(+) Th17 cell differentiation, and a regional inflammatory response develops in the paw-draining lymph nodes by an IL-17-dependent mechanism. The activation of these Th17-trophic iMO precedes arthritis development and occurs in the context of an autoreactive CD4(+) Th1 cell response. Adoptive transfer of HA-specific CD4(+) T cells into nonarthritic mice expressing HA as a self-Ag similarly led to the formation of Th1 cells and of iMO that could support Th17 cell formation, and, notably, the accumulation of these iMO in the lymph nodes was blocked by IFN-γ neutralization. These studies show that autoreactive CD4(+) Th1 cells directed to a systemically distributed self-Ag can promote the development of a regional Th17 cell inflammatory response by driving the recruitment of Th17-trophic iMO to the lymph nodes.
    The Journal of Immunology 02/2013; · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are required to restrain the immune system from mounting an autoaggressive systemic inflammatory response, but why their activity can prevent (or allow) organ-specific autoimmunity remains poorly understood. We have examined how TCR specificity contributes to Treg activity using a mouse model of spontaneous autoimmune arthritis, in which CD4(+) T cells expressing a clonotypic TCR induce disease by an IL-17-dependent mechanism. Administration of polyclonal Tregs suppressed Th17 cell formation and prevented arthritis development; notably, Tregs expressing the clonotypic TCR did not. These clonotypic Tregs exerted Ag-specific suppression of effector CD4(+) T cells using the clonotypic TCR in vivo, but failed to mediate bystander suppression and did not prevent Th17 cells using nonclonotypic TCRs from accumulating in joint-draining lymph nodes of arthritic mice. These studies indicate that the availability of Tregs with diverse TCR specificities can be crucial to their activity in autoimmune arthritis.
    The Journal of Immunology 03/2012; 188(9):4171-80. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autoreactive CD4+ T cells can undergo deletion and/or become CD25+Foxp3+ Treg as they develop intrathymically, but how these alternative developmental fates are specified based on interactions with self-peptide(s) is not understood. We show here that thymocytes expressing an autoreactive TCR can be subjected to varying degrees of deletion that correlate with the amount of self-peptide. Strikingly, among thymocytes that evade deletion, similar proportions acquire Foxp3 expression. These findings provide evidence that Foxp3+ Treg can develop among members of a cohort of autoreactive thymocytes that have evaded deletion by a self-peptide, and that deletion and Treg formation can act together to bias the Treg repertoire toward low-abundance self-peptide(s).
    European Journal of Immunology 09/2009; 39(12):3301-6. · 4.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recently it has been asserted that a closed chamber evaporimeter, the VapoMeter, offers advantages over standard open chamber devices in measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Purported improvements include the ability to take measurements at any angle, short reading times and insensitivity to external air currents. These claims are compelling, considering that measuring TEWL at diverse skin sites can be tedious, especially with children. The primary aim of this study was to compare the performance of closed and open chamber instruments when they were held at various angles and, secondly to evaluate the ability of the devices to discriminate between test conditions. The performance of closed chamber (VapoMeter) and open chamber (DermaLab) evaporimeters were compared by measuring water vapor emitted from IMS Vitro-skin that had been hydrated to a predetermined level. Measurements were taken at three angles from vertical - 0 degrees, 45 degrees, and 90 degrees. Vitro-skin samples were weighed periodically throughout the experimental phase to verify water loss rates. Both the VapoMeter and the DermaLab yielded significantly lower water loss values when held at angles that varied from the vertical (0 degrees) position, indicating that the closed chamber device is no more capable of accurately measuring TEWL at any angle than an open chamber instrument. The DermaLab provided better discrimination than the VapoMeter when the instruments were held vertically, as is the only prescribed testing position for open-chamber instruments. The VapoMeter was easier to use than the DermaLab; however, there was evidence that the sealed chamber could become saturated under high water loss conditions. Previous assertions that the VapoMeter closed chamber evaporimeter is capable of measuring TEWL regardless of angle were not validated. Each device appeared capable of accurately estimating water loss rates only in the vertical position. Although the VapoMeter was easier to use than the open chamber device, its tendency to become saturated under high water loss conditions could be a disadvantage when assessing dynamic TEWL.
    Skin Research and Technology 03/2009; 15(1):51-4. · 1.41 Impact Factor