Sheila C Rankin

The Bracton Centre, Oxleas NHS Trust, Дартфорде, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (12)32.74 Total impact

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    S Rankin
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    ABSTRACT: [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (CT) is recognized as a useful adjunct to conventional imaging with CT and endoscopic ultrasonography for the staging of oesophageal cancer, for response assessment and identification of recurrent disease and it may provide prognostic information.
    Cancer Imaging 01/2011; 11 Spec No A:S156-60. · 1.59 Impact Factor
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    S Rankin
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    ABSTRACT: Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent modalities for the localization of mediastinal masses and there are often features that may allow the correct diagnosis to be made. However, CT and MRI cannot usually assess the aggressiveness of masses or identify viable tumour in residual masses after chemotherapy. Metabolic imaging using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/CT, although not required in many cases, may be helpful for further characterization of masses and to guide the most appropriate site for biopsy.
    Cancer Imaging 01/2010; 10 Spec no A:S156-60. · 1.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many studies demonstrate a high accuracy for PET in staging lymphoma, but few assess observer variation. This study quantified agreement for staging lymphoma with PET/CT. The PET/CT images of 100 patients with lymphoma who had been referred for staging were reviewed by 3 experienced observers, with 2 observers reviewing each series a second time. Ann Arbor stage and individual nodal and extranodal regions were assessed. Weighted kappa (kappa(w)) and intraclass correlation coefficient were used to compare ratings. Intra- and interobserver agreement was high for Ann Arbor stage (kappa(w) = 0.79-0.91), number of nodal regions involved (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.83-0.93), and presence of extranodal disease (kappa = 0.74-0.86). High agreement was also observed for all nodal regions (kappa(w) > 0.60) except hilar (kappa(w) = 0.56-0.82) and infraclavicular (kappa(w) = 0.14-0.55). Lower agreement was observed for bowel involvement (kappa(w) = 0.37-0.71). Experienced observers had a high level of agreement using PET/CT for lymphoma staging, supporting its use as a robust noninvasive staging tool. Further research is needed to evaluate observer variability for restaging during and after chemotherapy.
    Journal of Nuclear Medicine 09/2009; 50(10):1594-7. · 5.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Error and variation in reporting remains one of the weakest features of clinical imaging despite enormous technological advances in nuclear medicine and radiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate agreement amongst experienced readers in staging non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with PET-CT. A series of (18)F-FDG PET-CT scans from 100 consecutive patients were reviewed independently by three experienced readers, with two readers reviewing each scan series a second time. Individual mediastinal lymph node stations were assessed as benign/inflammatory, equivocal or malignant, and AJCC N and M stage were also assigned. Kappa (kappa) was used to compare ratings from two categories and weighted kappa (kappa(w)) for three or more categories, and kappa values were interpreted according to the Landis-Koch benchmarks. Both intra- and interobserver agreement for N and M staging were high. For M staging there was almost perfect intra- and interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.90-0.93). For N staging, agreement was either almost perfect or substantial (intraobserver kappa(w) = 0.79, 0.91; interobserver kappa(w) = 0.75-0.81). Importantly, there was almost perfect agreement for N0/1 vs N2/3 disease (kappa = 0.80-0.97). Agreement for inferior and superior mediastinal nodes (stations 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9) was either almost perfect or substantial (kappa(w) = 0.71-0.88), but lower for hilar nodes (10; kappa(w) = 0.56-0.71). Interreporter variability was greatest for aortopulmonary nodes (5, 6; kappa(w) = 0.48-0.55). Amongst experienced reporters in a single centre, there was a very high level of agreement for both mediastinal nodal stage and detection of distant metastases with PET-CT. This supports the use of PET-CT as a robust imaging modality for staging NSCLC.
    European Journal of Nuclear Medicine 11/2008; 36(2):194-9. · 4.53 Impact Factor
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    Sheila Rankin
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    ABSTRACT: Correct staging of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is vital for appropriate management. Initial staging is usually performed with computerised tomography (CT), but increasingly functional imaging using integrated positron emission tomography and CT (PET/CT) is being used to provide more accurate staging, guide biopsies, assess response to therapy and identify recurrent disease.
    Cancer Imaging 02/2008; 8 Spec No A:S27-31. · 1.59 Impact Factor
  • Sheila C. Rankin
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    ABSTRACT: Correct staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is vital to undertake appropriate management and improve prognosis. Initial staging is usually performed with computerized tomography (CT), which has well recognized limitations, and increasingly functional imaging using integrated positron emission tomography and CT (PET/CT) is being used to provide more accurate staging, to guide biopsies, to assess response to therapy, and to identify recurrent disease. Staging and response to therapy will be discussed in this review.
    Targeted Oncology 01/2008; 3(3):149-159. · 3.46 Impact Factor
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    S C Rankin
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    ABSTRACT: The prognosis for oesophageal cancer is poor with a median survival of 3-5 months and recurrences are frequent. The best chance of cure is successful surgery and pre-operative chemoradiotherapy is used to try and improve outcomes. However, patients may either not respond or may progress during therapy and it is important to differentiate the responders from non-responders. Clinical parameters such as weight gain and improvement in swallowing can be assessed but imaging is used in an attempt to improve outcomes.
    Cancer Imaging 02/2007; 7 Spec No A:S67-9. · 1.59 Impact Factor
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    S C Rankin
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    ABSTRACT: Staging of non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) uses the TNM classification and is undertaken to identify those patients who are surgical candidates, either initially or after chemo-radiotherapy, and to differentiate patients who will be treated radically from those requiring palliation and to plan radiotherapy fields. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used in staging and provide anatomical information but have well known limitations in differentiating reactive from malignant nodes, fibrosis from active disease and in defining the extent of invasion. MRI, with its superior soft tissue contrast provides optimal information on brachial plexus and central nervous system involvement. Functional imaging using [2-(18F)]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is increasingly being used to provide unique information and when combined with anatomic imaging will provide better staging information for both local disease and the extent of metastases.
    Cancer Imaging 02/2006; 6:1-3. · 1.59 Impact Factor
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    Sheila C Rankin
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    ABSTRACT: FDG-PET is a useful tool in the imaging of head and neck tumours. It can be used to stage the primary tumour, to assess response to therapy and most importantly for the detection of recurrent tumour. The advantages and limitations of this technique are discussed in this article.
    Cancer Imaging 02/2006; 6:S89-95. · 1.59 Impact Factor
  • S. C. Rankin
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    ABSTRACT: Imaging plays a vital role in the management of NSCLC including diagnosis, staging and follow up. Computerised tomography (CT) is of value not only in the diagnosis of lung cancer, but also for screening and guiding intervention. CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used in staging and provide anatomical information but have well known limitations in differentiating reactive from malignant nodes, fibrosis from active disease and in defining the extent of invasion. MRI, with its superior soft tissue contrast provides optimal information on brachial plexus and central nervous system involvement. Functional imaging using 2-18 fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is increasingly being used to provide unique information and when combined with anatomic imaging will provide better staging information for both local disease and the extent of metastases. FDG-PET or 99mTc-depreotide may help in deciding which lesions need further investigation and the most appropriate lesion to biopsy. Multidetector CT is being used to detect lung cancer at an early stage when it is potentially curable by surgery although many problems exist, particularly the high false positive rates requiring further investigation, which will have implications on cost effectiveness for lung cancer screening programs.
    EJC Supplements 03/2004; 2(4):7-14. · 2.71 Impact Factor
  • Source
    S C Rankin
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    ABSTRACT: Imaging plays a vital role in the management of non-small cell lung cancer including diagnosis, staging and follow-up. CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used in staging and provide anatomical information but have well known limitations in differentiating reactive from malignant nodes, and fibrosis from active disease and in defining the extent of invasion. MRI with its superior soft tissue contrast provides optimal information on brachial plexus and central nervous system involvement. Functional imaging using 2-18 fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography is increasingly being used to provide unique information and when combined with anatomic imaging will provide better staging information for both local disease and the extent of metastases.
    Cancer Imaging 02/2004; 4 Spec No A:S22-4. · 1.59 Impact Factor
  • Sheila C Rankin
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    ABSTRACT: The response of lymphoma to treatment is usually documented using cross-sectional imaging. The definitions of response and the changes seen on CT and MRI in the chest and abdomen are well recognised. However, the appearances of residual masses are more variable and features that may help in diagnosis will be included in this review.
    European journal of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging 07/2003; 30 Suppl 1:S56-64. · 5.11 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

57 Citations
32.74 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2011
    • The Bracton Centre, Oxleas NHS Trust
      Дартфорде, England, United Kingdom
  • 2003–2008
    • Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust
      • Department of Radiology
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom