Harinder Garewal

Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, Arizona, United States

Are you Harinder Garewal?

Claim your profile

Publications (3)6.44 Total impact

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To study the effect of zoledronic acid on patients with pre-existing osteoporosis on androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), who are at highest risk for fracture. Zoledronic acid is a potent bisphosphonate that can prevent osteoporosis in patients with nonmetastatic (M0), prostate cancer (CaP) who are initiating ADT. The effect of zoledronic acid on patients with pre-existing osteoporosis on ADT, who are highest risk for fracture, has not been adequately studied. We enrolled 28 patients with M0 CaP on ADT with severe osteopenia or osteoporosis (baseline bone-mineral density (BMD) T score < -2.0) in this open-label, single-arm trial to assess the effect of zoledronic acid on BMD. All patients also received supplemental calcium and vitamin D, and were counseled about lifestyle modifications. Patients received zoledronic acid (4 mg) intravenously every 3 months for 4 treatments. BMD was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan at enrollment, 6 and 12 months. Primary endpoint was percent change in lumbar spine BMD. This was a high-risk patient population-primarily older Caucasians (mean age, 73 years), former smokers, and moderate users of alcohol. Mean duration of ADT was 2.4 years. Pre-existing osteopenia or osteoporosis was observed in a single site in 9 patients and multiple sites in 19 (68%). After 12 months of zoledronic acid, lumbar spine BMD increased 4.17% (P < .0001), and BMD increased significantly (P < .05) in both hips and the right femoral neck. Seven patients (25%) experienced improved BMD into the nonosteoporotic range (T score > -2.0). Zoledronic acid infusion was well tolerated and without substantial renal toxicity. Zoledronic acid improves BMD in men with M0 CaP on ADT with severe osteopenia or osteoporosis (T scores < 2.0). This novel finding identifies a high-risk patient population that can potentially benefit from bisphosphonate therapy.
    Urology 03/2010; 75(5):1138-43. · 2.42 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer is associated with osteoporosis and increased fracture risk. Previous studies of zoledronic acid demonstrated bone loss prevention in patients initiating androgen deprivation therapy. There are limited data on patients on prolonged androgen deprivation therapy or in Veterans Affairs patients with multiple risk factors for osteoporosis. We randomized 93 patients with M0 prostate cancer in this placebo controlled trial in the Veterans Affairs health care system. Preplanned strata included 50 patients on androgen deprivation therapy for less than 1 year (stratum 1) and 43 on androgen deprivation therapy for greater than 1 year (stratum 2). In each stratum patients were randomized to 4 mg zoledronic acid intravenously every 3 months for 4 treatments or intravenous placebo. The primary end point was the percent change in bone mineral density at the lumbar spine at 12 months. Age, race, body mass index and osteoporosis risk factors were similar for the 2 treatments. Most patients were former smokers, had moderate alcohol intake, were not on calcium/vitamin D supplements and were relatively sedentary at baseline. In stratum 1 spine bone mineral density increased 5.95% in the zoledronic acid arm and decreased 3.23% in the placebo arm (p = 0.0044). In stratum 2 spine bone mineral density increased 6.08% in the zoledronic acid arm and only increased 1.57% in the placebo arm (p = 0.0005). Treatment was well tolerated with minimal impact on renal function. Zoledronic acid improved bone mineral density in patients with M0 prostate cancer on androgen deprivation therapy for 1 year or less, or greater than 1 year. This finding indicates that bisphosphonate therapy remains effective when initiated later in the course of androgen deprivation therapy and is efficacious in Veterans Affairs patients with multiple risk factors for osteoporosis.
    The Journal of urology 09/2009; 182(5):2257-64. · 4.02 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Urology - J UROL. 01/2008; 179(4):252-252.