Yan Bing Zhang

University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, United States

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Publications (26)12.45 Total impact

  • Racheal A. Ruble, Yan Bing Zhang
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined stereotypes of Chinese international students held by Americans in two parts. To begin, 100 American students from a large Midwestern university listed traits describing a typical Chinese student, generating 31 frequent descriptors. Next, 146 American participants reported the percentage of Chinese students they believed to possess each of the 31 traits and the favorability of those traits. Exploratory factor analysis revealed five primary stereotypes of Chinese students. Some reflect previous literature concerning stereotypes of Asians generally (e.g., smart/hardworking, shy/not social, and bad English/not assimilated), whereas others are more unique (e.g., nice/friendly and oblivious/annoying). Stereotypes ranged from highly favorable (i.e., nice/friendly and smart/hardworking) to highly unfavorable (i.e., oblivious/annoying). Results are discussed with respect to prior literature on stereotypes of Asians and Asian Americans and implications for communication between American and Chinese students.
    International Journal of Intercultural Relations 03/2013; 37(2):202–211. · 1.14 Impact Factor
  • Yi Song, Yan Bing Zhang
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined Chinese daughters-in-law's (N = 287) perceptions of the husband's conflict management styles in their dyadic interaction regarding mother/daughter-in-law conflicts and associations with marital satisfaction and relational satisfaction with the mother-in-law. Results showed that the problem-solving style was perceived to be used most by the husband, followed by the accommodating, avoiding, and competing styles. In addition, the problem-solving and accommodating styles were positively associated, whereas the competing and avoiding styles were negatively associated with judgments of communication appropriateness and effectiveness, and the relational satisfaction variables. Furthermore, results indicated a moderator effect of shared family identity on the associations between perceptions of the husband's conflict management styles and relational satisfaction with the mother-in-law. Implications of the findings were discussed with reference to the prior literature on interpersonal conflict management, the Common Ingroup Identity Model, family relationships, as well as culture change in China.
    Journal of Family Communication 01/2012; 12(1):57-74.
  • Makiko Imamura, Yan Bing Zhang, Cheongmi Shim
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    ABSTRACT: Guided by the intergroup contact hypothesis and intergroup contact theory, the authors examined US Americans' (N=403) communication experiences and relational solidarity with their most frequent Japanese contact and associations with their attitudes toward Japanese as a cultural group. Structure Equation Modeling (SEM) results showed that both communication frequency and quality had an indirect effect through relational solidarity on affective, behavioral, and cognitive attitudes, demonstrating the critical mediating role of relational solidarity. Results also revealed that communication quality was positively and directly associated with the attitudinal measures. Implications of the findings are discussed with respect to prior literature on relational communication in intergroup and intercultural contexts.
    Asian Journal of Communication 01/2012; 22(6). · 0.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study examined Japanese college students’ ( N  = 476) use of sexually explicit material (SEM) and associations with perceptions of women as sex objects and sexually permissive attitudes. Results indicate that Japanese college students used print media most frequently as a source for SEM followed by the Internet and the television/video/DVD. Male participants used SEM significantly more than females. In addition, sexual preoccupancy mediated the relationship between exposure to SEM and perceptions of women as sex objects, whereas exposure to SEM in mass media had a direct association with Japanese participants’ sexually permissive attitudes.
    Journal of Intercultural Communication Research 07/2011; 40(2):93-110.
  • Makiko Imamura, Yan Bing Zhang, Jake Harwood
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    ABSTRACT: Guided by the intergroup contact hypothesis, the authors examined the associations among Japanese sojourners' (N = 94) perceived linguistic competence with English, communication accommodation of their most frequent American contact, relational solidarity with the contact, and their attitudes toward Americans as a cultural group. Results indicated that participants' linguistic competence with English and perceptions of Americans' communication accommodation positively predicted their relational solidarity with their most frequent American contact. In addition, relational solidarity mediated the relationships between both linguistic competence and communication accommodation and cognitive and behavioral attitudes. Results were discussed in light of communication accommodation theory, the contact hypothesis and prior literature in intergroup and intercultural communication.
    Journal of Asian Pacific Communication 12/2010; 21(1):115-132.
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    Shu-Chin Lien, Yan Bing Zhang, Mary Lee Hummert
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    ABSTRACT: A content and thematic analysis of 109 episodes (94.9 h) of prime-time dramas examined the portrayals of aging and the nature of intergenerational interaction involving older adults on Taiwanese television. The content analysis revealed that older characters, regardless of sex, appeared less frequently and in less prominent roles than other adult characters, but not in comparison to adolescents and children. The older characters who did appear, however, were predominantly portrayed as cognitively sound and physically healthy. The thematic analysis provided a different picture, showing that older characters talked about age explicitly, strategically linking it to death and despondence, to influence younger characters. Communication behavior themes identified included supporting, superiority, and controlling for older characters, and reverence/respect for younger characters. Findings are compared to those from similar studies of U.S. media and discussed from a Cultivation Theory perspective in terms of their reinforcement of Chinese age stereotypes and the traditional values of filial piety and age hierarchy in the context of globalization and culture change.
    Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology 09/2009; 24(4):355-72.
  • Yan Bing Zhang, Mei-Chen Lin
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    ABSTRACT: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0261927X09341836 This study examined American young adults’ written accounts of intergenerational communication with a focus on factors that initiate conflict. Analysis of the conflict scenarios in intergenerational relationships revealed seven types of initiating factors. Results also indicated that the type of relationship with older adults was associated with the frequency distribution of five of the seven initiating factors. Specifically, young adults perceived they were criticized and rebuffed by nonfamily elders more frequently than by family elders, whereas young people tended to disagree with and rebuff family elders more than nonfamily elders. Furthermore, young people reported more incidents of illegitimate demand from family elders than from nonfamily elders. Results are discussed with respect to intergenerational communication research and the Communication Predicament of Aging Model.
    Journal of Language and Social Psychology 01/2009; · 1.04 Impact Factor
  • Yan Bing Zhang, Mei-Chen Lin
    Journal of Language and Social Psychology 01/2009; · 1.04 Impact Factor
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    Yan Bing Zhang, Yi Song, Leilani Jensen Carver
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    ABSTRACT: http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/japc.18.2.06zha This study examined commercials (N = 141) featuring older adult(s) shown on three Chinese TV stations (i.e., national, provincial, and local) in the fall of 2005 to uncover the dominant value themes, the major product categories, and the association between value themes and product categories. Content analysis results revealed that three dominant value themes (i.e., health/life, product effectiveness, and family) appeared frequently in the Chinese television commercials featuring older adults, in which some major product categories such as food/drink, food/health supplements, and medicine were promoted. Results also indicated that the value of health/life was presented frequently in commercials for medicine and food/health supplements and that the family value appeared frequently in food/drinks commercials. Altogether these results demonstrated the importance of health and a lack of emphasis of modern values in Chinese television commercials which feature older adults, indicating a mixed view of aging (i.e., passive and negative). Findings are discussed in the context of the Chinese culture, aging, and television advertising.
    Journal of Asian Pacific Communication 01/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: Author Final Draft doi:10.1080/17544750802287935 Research has demonstrated that police officers’ communicative practices are potent predictors of individuals’ expressed reactions to law enforcement. The present study continues this line of work in Taiwan, the People’s Republic of China, and the United States by testing a theoretical model pertaining to the influence of perceived police officer accommodation and reported trust on attitudes about compliance with police requests. In addition to differences in reported levels of these variables across locations, findings indicated that perceived police officer communication accommodation predicted trust in police which, in turn, predicted attitudes about compliance with police requests. The empirical and practical significance of these findings are discussed.
    01/2008;
  • Yan Bing Zhang, Lin Mei-Chen
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    ABSTRACT: Author Final Draft doi:10.1075/japc.18.2.02lin This study examined interview accounts from thirty-one Taiwanese older adults’ about their inter- and intra-generational communication experiences, and perceptions of today’s young and older people. Thematic analysis showed that Taiwanese older adults tended to initiate conversation topics accommodative to young people’s lives such as their job and marriage, whereas conversation topics with their old-age peers centered on adjustment into senior years (e.g., health, exercise) and their children’s achievement. Analysis also revealed some of the Taiwanese older adults’ major perceptions of young people (e.g., less respectful towards elders) and their peers (e.g., losing status in the family). The discursive strategies used in constructing such perceptions (e.g., discourse on self exception, denial of self inclusion) demonstrated the ways in which they negotiated and managed their age identity in inter- and intra-generational communication. Results are discussed in light of Social Identity Theory, Communication Accommodation Theory, age identity, filial piety, and culture change.
    Journal of Asian Pacific Communication 01/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: Author final draft doi:10.1177/1461444807080339 This study examined the relationship between relational quality and media use in interpersonal relationships. In addition, the impacts of other potentially important variables such as sex and relationship type of participants and their partners were explored. College student participants focused on interaction experiences with an acquaintance, friend, romantic partner, or family member. Questions addressed the sex of relational partners, how much of participants’ total communication with relational partners is conducted in each of three media (i.e., face-to-face, phone, and internet), and the quality of relationships. Results indicated that participant sex and partner sex did not affect reported media use, whereas relationship type had significant effects on the extent to which face-to-face and telephone communication were used. Specifically, among the college students studied, face-to-face communication was used least with family members and the telephone was used most with family members. Relationships with acquaintances had the lowest relational quality and romantic relationships, while closer, were less satisfying than either family or friendship relationships. Same-sex relationships were perceived as more satisfying than cross-sex relationships. Finally, media use did not predict relational closeness or satisfaction. Results are discussed in light of previous research on mediated interpersonal communication and conceptualizations of the role of communication technology in one’s social life are highlighted.
    New Media &amp Society 10/2007; · 1.39 Impact Factor
  • Yan Bing Zhang, Kai Wang
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    ABSTRACT: Permissions were not obtained for sharing the full text of this article. This study examined stereotype traits of Chinese young adults generated by 180 older, middle-aged, and young Chinese participants. Trait lists were compared across age groups and to Western traits reported in earlier research. Results indicated a considerable overlap between stereotype traits generated by the Chinese participants and those from earlier studies with Western participants (e.g., energetic, ambitious, and reckless). Unique Chinese traits (e.g., filial, hedonistic, and individualistic) associated with young adults were also identified. Whereas the middle-aged and older participants listed an equal number of positive and negative traits, the young participants generated significantly more negative traits than positive ones. Discussion focuses on the impact of modernization and cultural change on perceptions of young adults in the Chinese society.
    01/2006;
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    ABSTRACT: From a multinational perspective, this article provides an overview of a number of research programs examining portrayals of older adults in advertising. The research described includes both quantitative and qualitative analyses of the place of older people in advertising and the ways this is associated with older adults’ place in society. This article is organized around three central themes: an overview of the major theoretical perspectives surrounding advertising and aging; an overview of research conducted in the United States, Great Britain, Germany, China, and India; and a final critique.
    Journal of Language and Social Psychology 01/2006; 25(3):264-282. · 1.04 Impact Factor
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    Mei-Chen Lin, Yan Bing Zhang, Jake Harwood
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined intergenerational communication schemas by investigating young adults' cognitive representations of communication with older adults in Taiwan. Forty-one Taiwanese college students described conversations with an older adult in response to a variety of interviewer prompts. Transcripts were read and content analyzed by the first two authors. To capture the characteristics of the conversation descriptions, eleven coding dimensions were generated based on schema theory, and all conversation descriptions were coded along these dimensions. Coding results were submitted to hierarchical cluster analysis, yielding five schemas: Mutually satisfying, helping, mixed feelings, small talk, and mutually unpleasant conversations. Results are discussed in terms of similarities and differences from Harwood, McKee and Lin's (2000) study, schema theory, intergenerational communication, and Chinese cultural norms.
    Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology 01/2005; 19(4):321-42.
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    Yan Bing Zhang, Jake Harwood, Mary Lee Hummert
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    ABSTRACT: DOI: 10.1080/0363775052000342535 We examined intergenerational communication and conflict management styles in China. Older and younger Chinese adults were randomly assigned to evaluate one of four conversation transcripts in which an older worker criticizes a young co-worker. The young worker’s communication was varied across the transcripts to reflect four conflict management styles: competing, avoiding, accommodating, and problem-solving. As expected, older participants favored the accommodating style over the problem-solving style. Young adults either preferred the problem-solving style to the accommodating style, as predicted, or judged the two styles as equally positive. The results illustrate the juxtaposition of tradition and modernization/globalization in the changing Chinese cultural context, and demonstrate how such cultural changes are reflected in interpersonal communication between the generations.
    Communication Monographs 01/2005; · 2.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: DOI: 10.1080/00036810500130539 This study examined 1631 college students’ endorsement of traditional Confucian values in four East Asian cultural contexts (i.e., China, Korea, Japan and Taiwan). Findings showed that young people endorsed values of interpersonal harmony the most, followed by the relational hierarchy and traditional conservatism respectively. Results also indicated that participants in China provided the highest ratings for interpersonal harmony and relational hierarchy among the four cultures. Finally, results demonstrated that Japanese females were more conservative than Japanese males and females in China and Taiwan. Results were discussed in the philosophical tradition of Confucianism, globalization and culture change in the East Asian cultures.
    01/2005;
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    Yan Bing Zhang
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined young adults' written accounts of intergenerational communication in conflict situations in the People's Republic of China. Using a content analysis approach, this study identified five major types of initiating factors that precipitated intergenerational conflict. Old-to-young criticism was most frequent, followed by illegitimate demand and rebuff. The least frequent initiating factors included young-to-old criticism and disagreement/generation gap. In addition, results indicated that more rebuffs were from nonfamily elders than from family elders, whereas disagreement with family elders was more frequent than with non-family elders. Proportionally speaking, no differences emerged between family and nonfamily elders for criticism (both old-to-young and young-to-old) and illegitimate demand. Results are discussed with respect to research in intergenerational communication, interpersonal conflict, and the Chinese socio-cultural norm of hierarchy and filial piety.
    Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology 01/2005; 19(4):299-319.
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    Nancy K. Baym, Yan Bing Zhang, Mei-Chen Lin
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    ABSTRACT: Author final draft doi:10.1177/1461444804041438 Two studies were conducted in this investigation to compare college students’ interpersonal interaction online, face-to-face, and on the telephone. Our first study, a communication diary, assessed the relative amount of social interactions college students conducted via the internet in comparison to face-to-face conversations and telephone calls. Results indicated that the internet was used nearly as often as the telephone, however, face-to-face communication was far more frequent. The second study, a survey, compared participants’ reported use of the internet within their local and long distance social circles to the use of other media within those circles, and examined participants’ most recent significant social interactions conducted online, face-to-face, and on the telephone in terms of purposes, contexts, and quality. Results indicated that online interaction was perceived as high in quality, but slightly lower than telephone calls and face-to-face conversations. In addition, participants’ estimated use of the internet was positively correlated with the use of other modes of interpersonal communication. Together, results showed that the internet was integrated into social life, but face-to-face remained the dominant mode of interpersonal communication.
    New Media &amp Society 01/2004; · 1.39 Impact Factor
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    Yan Bing Zhang, Jake Harwood
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    ABSTRACT: DOI: 10.1111/j.1460-2466.2004.tb02619.x Commercials (N = 496) shown on three Chinese TV stations in the summer of 2000 were analyzed to uncover the dominant value themes in the commercials. Thirteen value themes were identified as applicable in the current sample. This study found that the most dominant value themes emerged in the Chinese commercials were product effectiveness, family, modernity, beauty/youth, and pleasure indicating the prevalence of utilitarian values and the coexistence of both traditional and modern values in the world of Chinese advertising. Value themes identified in this study are compared with previous conceptualizations, and discussed in the context of globalization and Chinese cultural change.
    Journal of Communication 01/2004; · 2.45 Impact Factor