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Publications (3)6.88 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of thyroid nodules ranges between 2% and 60% depending on the population studied. However, minimally invasive procedures like radiofrequency ablation (rfA) are increasingly used to treat tumors of parenchymatous organs, and seem to be suitable for singular thyroid nodules as well. Their successful clinical application depends on the induction of sufficiently large lesions and a knowledge of the energy parameters required for complete thermal ablation. The aim of this study was to establish a dose-response relationship for rfA of thyroid nodules. Thermal lesions were induced in healthy porcine thyroid glands ex vivo (n=110) and in vivo (n=10) using a bipolar radiofrequency system; rf was applied in a power range of 10-20 watts. During the ablation, continuous temperature measurement at a distance of 5 and 10 mm from the applicator was performed. The transversal and axial lesion diameters were measured, and the volume was calculated. Furthermore, enzyme histochemical analysis of the thyroid tissue was performed. The inducible lesion volumes were between 0.91±0.71 cm(3) at 20W and 2.80±0.85 cm(3) at 14W. The maximum temperatures after rf ablation were between 44.0±9.7°C and 61.6±13.9°C at a distance of 5 mm and between 30.0±8.6°C and 53.5±8.6°C at a distance of 10 mm from the applicator. The histochemical analysis demonstrates a complete loss of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (NADPH) dehydrogenase activity in thermal lesions as a sign of irreversible cell damage. This study is the first to demonstrate a dose-response relationship for rfA of thyroid tissue. rfA is suitable for singular thyroid nodules and induces reproducible, clinically relevant lesions with irreversible cell damage in an appropriate application time.
    Journal of Surgical Research 08/2011; 169(2):234-40. · 2.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Alternative minimally invasive treatment options such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) are at present under investigation for achieving a nonsurgical targeted cytoreduction in benign and malignant thyroid lesions. So far, studies have not been able to show a secure advantage for neither LITT nor RFA. The aim of this study was to compare the two ablation procedures in terms of their effectiveness. Thermal lesions were induced in porcine thyroid glands either by LITT or bipolar RFA ex vivo (n = 110 each) and in vivo (n = 10 each) using power settings between 10 and 20 W. Temperature spread during application was documented in 5- and 10-mm distance of the applicator. Postinterventional lesion diameters were measured and lesion size was calculated. Furthermore, enzyme histochemical analysis of the thyroid tissue was performed in vivo. Lesion volumes induced by LITT ranged between 0.74 ± 0.18 cm(3) (10 W) and 3.80 ± 0.41 cm(3) (20 W) with a maximum of 5.13 ± 0.16 cm(3) at 18 W. The inducible lesion volumes by RFA were between 2.43 ± 0.68 cm(3) (10 W) and 0.91 ± 0.71 cm(3) (20 W) with a maximum of 2.80 ± 0.85 cm(3) at 14 W. The maximum temperatures were 112.9 ± 9.2°C (LITT) and 61.6 ± 13.9°C (RFA) at a distance of 5 mm and 73.2 ± 6.7°C (LITT) and 53.5 ± 8.6°C (RFA) at a distance of 10 mm. The histochemical analysis demonstrates a complete loss of NADPH dehydrogenase activity in thermal lesions as a sign of irreversible cell damage both for LITT and RFA. This study is the first to compare the effectiveness of laser-induced thermotherapy and radiofrequency ablation of thyroid tissue. LITT as well as RFA are suitable for singular thyroid nodules and induces reproducible clinically relevant lesions in an appropriate application time. The maximum inducible lesion volumes by LITT are significantly larger than by RFA with the devices used herein.
    Lasers in Medical Science 04/2011; 26(4):545-52. · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The prevalence of thyroid nodules ranges between 2% and 60% depending on the population studied. However, minimally invasive procedures like laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) are increasingly used to treat tumors of parenchymatous organs and seem to be suitable for singular thyroid nodules as well. Their successful clinical application depends on the induction of sufficiently large lesions and a knowledge of the energy parameters required for complete thermal ablation. The aim of this study was to establish a dose-response relationship for LITT of thyroid nodules. Thermal lesions were induced in healthy porcine thyroid glands ex vivo (n = 110) and in vivo (n = 10) using an Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm). Laser energy was applied for 300 seconds in a power range of 10-20 W. During the ablation, continuous temperature measurement at a distance of 5 and 10 mm from the applicator was performed. The lesions were longitudinally and transversally measured, and the volume was calculated. Furthermore, enzyme histochemical analysis of the thyroid tissue was performed. The maximum inducible lesion volumes were between 0.74 +/- 0.18 cm(3) at a laser power of 10 W and 3.80 +/- 0.41 cm(3) at 20 W. The maximum temperatures after ablation were between 72.9 +/- 2.9 degrees C (10 W) and 112.9 +/- 9.2 degrees C (20 W) at a distance of 5 mm and between 49.5 +/- 2.2 degrees C (10 W) and 73.2 +/- 6.7 degrees C (20 W) at a distance of 10 mm from the applicator. The histochemical analysis demonstrates a complete loss of NADPH dehydrogenase activity in thermal lesions as a sign of irreversible cell damage. This study is the first to demonstrate a dose-response relationship for LITT of thyroid tissue. LITT is suitable for singular thyroid nodules and induces reproducible clinically relevant lesions with irreversible cell damage in an appropriate application time.
    Lasers in Surgery and Medicine 09/2009; 41(7):479-86. · 2.46 Impact Factor