Kohei Wada

University of Toyama, Тояма, Toyama, Japan

Are you Kohei Wada?

Claim your profile

Publications (9)27.98 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Orexin acts as an orexigenic factor for the regulation of appetite and rhythmicity in rodents. In goldfish, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of orexin A has been shown to affect not only food intake, but also locomotor activity. However, as there is still no information regarding the effect of orexin A on emotional behavior in goldfish, we investigated the effect of orexin A on psychomotor activity in this species. Intracerebroventricular administration of synthetic orexin A at 2 and 4 pmol/g body weight (BW) enhanced locomotor activity, and this enhancement by orexin A at 4 pmol/g BW was attenuated by treatment with the orexin receptor 1 antagonist, SB334867, at 10 pmol/g BW. Since intact goldfish prefer a black to a white background area, or the lower to the upper area of a tank, we used two types of preference test (black/white and upper/lower tests) for measuring anxiety-like behavior in goldfish. Intracerebroventricular administration of orexin A at 4 pmol/g BW shortened the time spent in the white background area, and increased the time taken to move from the lower to the upper area. This action of orexin A mimicked that of the central-type benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist, FG-7142 (an anxiogenic agent), at 4 pmol/g BW. The anxiogenic-like effect of orexin A was abolished by treatment with SB334867 at 10 pmol/g BW. These results indicate that orexin A potently affects psychomotor activity in goldfish.
    Hormones and Behavior 06/2014; · 3.74 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Orexin acts as an orexigenic factor for the regulation of appetite and rhythmicity in rodents. In goldfish, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of orexin A has been shown to affect not only food intake, but also locomotor activity. However, as there is still no information regarding the effect of orexin A on emotional behavior in goldfish, we investigated the effect of orexin A on psychomotor activity in this species. Intracerebroventricular administration of synthetic orexin A at 2 and 4 pmol/g body weight (BW) enhanced locomotor activity, and this enhancement by orexin A at 4 pmol/g BW was attenuated by treatment with the orexin receptor 1 antagonist, SB334867, at 10 pmol/g BW. Since intact goldfish prefer a black to a white background area, or the lower to the upper area of a tank, we used two types of preference test (black/white and upper/lower tests) for measuring anxiety-like behavior in goldfish. Intracerebroventricular administration of orexin A at 4 pmol/g BW shortened the time spent in the white background area, and increased the time taken to move from the lower to the upper area. This action of orexin A mimicked that of the central-type benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist, FG-7142 (an anxiogenic agent), at 4 pmol/g BW. The anxiogenic-like effect of orexin A was abolished by treatment with SB334867 at 10 pmol/g BW. These results indicate that orexin A potently affects psychomotor activity in goldfish.
    Hormones and Behavior 01/2014; · 3.74 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a member of the hypothalamic neuropeptide family that includes urocortins, urotensin I and sauvagine in vertebrates. CRH and urocortin act as anorexigenic factors for satiety regulation in rodents. In a goldfish model, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of ovine CRH (oCRH) affects not only food intake, but also locomotor activity. However, there is no information regarding the psychophysiological roles of CRH in goldfish. Therefore, we investigated the effect of oCRH on psychomotor activity in this species. ICV administration of synthetic oCRH at 20 pmol/g body weight (BW) enhanced locomotor activity. Since intact goldfish prefer the lower to the upper area of a tank, we developed a method for measuring the time taken for fish to move from the lower to the upper area. ICV administration of oCRH at 20 pmol/g BW and the central-type benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist FG-7142 (an anxiogenic agent) at 1-4 pmol/g BW both increased the time taken to move from the lower to the upper area. This anxiogenic-like effect of oCRH was abolished by the CRH receptor antagonist α-helical CRH((9-41)) (100 pmol/g BW). These results indicate that CRH can potently affect locomotor and psychomotor activities in goldfish.
    General and Comparative Endocrinology 01/2013; · 2.82 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to investigate the distribution of the octadecaneuropeptide (ODN) in the goldfish brain and to look for a possible effect of ODN on somatolactin (SL) release from pituitary cells. A discrete population of ODN-immunoreactive neurones was localized in the lateral part of the nucleus lateralis tuberis. These neurones sent projections through the neurohypophyseal tract towards the neurohypophysis, and nerve fibres were seen in close vicinity of SL-producing cells in the pars intermedia (PI). Incubation of cultured goldfish pituitary cells with graded concentrations of ODN (10(-9) -10(-5) M) induced a dose-dependent stimulation of SL release. ODN-evoked SL release was blocked by the metabotropic endozepine receptor antagonist cyclo(1-8) [DLeu(5) ]OP, but was not affected by the central-type benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil. ODN-induced SL release was suppressed by treatment with the PLC inhibitor U-73122 but not with the PKA inhibitor H-89. These results indicate that, in fish, ODN produced by hypothalamic neurones acts as a hypophysiotropic neuropeptide stimulating SL release. The effect of ODN is mediated through a metabotropic endozepine receptor positively coupled to the PLC/IP(3) /PKC-signaling pathway. © 2012 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.
    Journal of Neuroendocrinology 11/2012; · 3.51 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: I.c.v. administration of the octadecaneuropeptide (ODN), a peptide derived from diazepam-binding inhibitor (DBI), induces anorexigenic and anxiogenic-like actions in rodents. We have recently shown that, in goldfish, i.c.v. injection of ODN also reduces food consumption via the metabotropic endozepine receptor. However, there is little information regarding the structure of DBI and the psychophysiological roles of endozepines in fish. Therefore, in the present study, we isolated and cloned a cDNA encoding goldfish DBI. The deduced sequence exhibits high similarity with non-mammalian DBIs, and we investigated the effect of homologous ODN on psychomotor activity in goldfish. i.c.v. injection of synthetic goldfish ODN at 10 pmol/g body weight (BW) stimulated locomotor activity. Since intact goldfish placed in a tank with both black and white background areas prefers the black compartment, we developed a method for measuring the time taken for fish to move from the black to the white area. I.c.v. administration of diazepam (35 and 350 pmol/g BW) decreased, whereas i.c.v. administration of ODN (10 pmol/g BW) or the central-type benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist FG-7142 (9 pmol/g BW) increased the time taken to move from the black to the white background area. The anxiogenic-like effect of ODN was blocked by the central-type benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil (100 pmol/g BW), but was not affected by the metabotropic endozepine receptor antagonist cyclo1-8[d-Leu(5)]octapeptide (100 pmol/g BW). These data indicate that ODN can potently affect locomotor and psychomotor activities in goldfish and that this action is mediated via the central-type benzodiazepine receptor-signaling pathway.
    Neuroscience 03/2011; 181:100-8. · 3.12 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of the octadecaneuropeptide (ODN), a peptide derived from diazepam-binding inhibitor, reduces food intake in goldfish as in rodents. However, the neurochemical pathways involved in the anorexigenic action of ODN have not yet been identified in goldfish. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), and CRH-related peptides play a major role in the control of food consumption in goldfish. In this species, the anorexigenic action of alpha-MSH is mediated via the CRH/CRH receptor neuronal system. Therefore, in the present study, we examined whether the anorexigenic effect of ODN in goldfish could be mediated through alpha-MSH and/or CRH neuronal pathways. ICV injection of ODN (10 pmol/g body weight (BW)) significantly reduced food intake, and the anorexigenic effect of ODN was suppressed by ICV preinjection of the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) antagonist HS024 (40 pmol/g BW) or the CRH receptor 1/receptor 2 antagonist alpha-helical CRH((9-41)) (100 pmol/g BW). ICV injection of ODN (10 pmol/g BW) induced a significant increase of proopiomelanocortin mRNA level but had no effect on CRH mRNA level, while ICV injection of the MC4R agonist, melanotan II (100 pmol/g BW), significantly enhanced CRH mRNA expression. These results suggest that, in goldfish, the anorexigenic action of ODN is mediated by the MC4R- and subsequently through the CRH receptor-signaling pathways.
    Journal of Molecular Neuroscience 03/2010; 42(1):74-9. · 2.89 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Our recent research has indicated that neuromedin U (NMU) orthologs exist in goldfish, and that NMU consisting of 21 amino acid residues (NMU-21) can potently inhibit food intake in goldfish, as is the case in rodents. However, the anorexigenic pathway of NMU-21 has not yet been clarified in this species. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), CRH-related peptides and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), which exert potent anorexigenic effects, are important mediators involved in feeding regulation in fish. We examined whether CRH or alpha-MSH mediates NMU-21-induced anorexigenic action in goldfish. We first investigated the effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of NMU-21 at 100 pmol/g body weight (BW), which is enough to suppress food intake, on expression levels of mRNA for CRH and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) in the hypothalamus. ICV-injected NMU-21 induced a significant increase in the expression level of CRH mRNA, but not that of POMC mRNA. We also examined the effects of ICV administration of the CRH 1/2 receptor antagonist, alpha-helical CRH((9-41)), and the melanocortin 4 receptor antagonist, HS024, on the anorexigenic action of ICV-injected NMU-21. The anorexigenic effect of NMU-21 was blocked by treatment with alpha-helical CRH((9-41)) at 400 pmol/g BW, but not HS024 at 200 pmol/g BW. These results suggest that the anorexigenic action of NMU-21 is mediated by the CRH 1 or 2 receptor-signaling pathway in goldfish.
    Peptides 09/2009; 30(12):2483-6. · 2.52 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) both suppress food intake, and the alpha-MSH- or CRH-signaling pathway has possible potency to mediate anorexigenic actions induced by most other neuropeptides in goldfish. Therefore, using specific receptor antagonists, we examined whether the anorexigenic actions of alpha-MSH and CRH mutually interact. The inhibitory effect of ICV injection of the alpha-MSH agonist, melanotan II (MT II), on food intake was abolished by treatment with a CRH 1/2 receptor antagonist, alpha-helical CRH((9-41)), whereas the anorexigenic action of ICV-injected CRH was not affected by treatment with a melanocortin 4 receptor antagonist, HS024. This led us to investigate whether alpha-MSH-containing neurons in the goldfish brain have direct inputs to CRH-containing neurons, using confocal laser scanning microscopy. alpha-MSH- and CRH-like immunoreactivities were distributed throughout the brain, especially in the diencephalon. alpha-MSH-containing nerve fibers or endings lay in close apposition to CRH-containing neurons in a region of the hypothalamus, the nucleus posterioris periventricularis (NPPv). These results indicate that, in goldfish, alpha-MSH-induced anorexigenic action is mediated by the CRH-signaling pathway, and that CRH plays a crucial role in the regulation of feeding behavior as an integrated anorexigenic neuropeptide in this species.
    Peptides 11/2008; 29(11):1930-6. · 2.52 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An endogenous ligand of central-type benzodiazepine receptors (CBR), the endozepine octadecaneuropeptide (ODN), is a very potent inhibitor of food intake in rodents. Although endozepines have been localized and characterized in the trout hypothalamus, so far, the action of these neuropeptides on feeding behavior has never been investigated in fish. In the present study, we have examined the effect of i.c.v. administration of synthetic rat ODN, its C-terminal octapeptide (OP) and the head-to-tail cyclic analog cyclo(1-8)OP (cOP) on feeding behavior in the goldfish model. i.c.v. injection of graded doses of ODN (2.5-10 pmol/g body weight (BW)) induced a dose-dependent inhibition of food intake, a significant decrease in cumulative food intake during the 60-min period after feeding being observed at doses of 5 and 10 pmol/g BW. The inhibitory effect of a 10 pmol/g BW dose of ODN on food consumption (-39%) was mimicked by an equimolar dose of OP (-42%) and cOP (-53%). The food intake-suppressing activity of ODN (10 pmol/g BW) was not affected by pre-injection of the CBR antagonist flumazenil (200 pmol/g BW). In contrast, the anorexigenic effect of ODN (10 pmol/g BW) was totally suppressed by a selective antagonist of metabotropic endozepine receptors, cyclo(1-8)[dLeu(5)]OP. These data indicate that, in goldfish as in rodents, ODN is a potent inhibitor of food consumption, and that the anorexigenic effect of ODN is not mediated through CBR but through the metabotropic endozepine receptor.
    Neuroscience 01/2008; 150(2):425-32. · 3.12 Impact Factor