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Publications (5)10.8 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: To evaluate the influence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) on survival, and quality of life (QOL) after aortic valve replacement (AVR) in elderly patients with small prosthesis size. METHODS: Between 2005 and 2010, 142 patients older than 65 years were discharged from the hospital after AVR with 19 or 21 mm prosthesis for aortic stenosis. Their median age was 79 years (range 66 to 91). Prosthesis effective orifice area (EOA) was derived from the continuity equation and PPM was defined as an indexed EOA (IEOA) < 0.85 cm(2) /m(2) . Patients having IEOA < 0.75 cm(2) /m(2) and IEOA < 0.60 cm(2) /m(2) were also investigated. Mean follow-up was 23 months (range 1 to 58) and was 98% complete. RESULTS: PPM was found in 86 patients, 63 had an IEOA ≤ 0.75 cm(2) /m(2) , and 23 had an IEOA ≤ 0.60 cm(2) /m(2) . The groups were similar except for older age (p = 0.0364), larger body surface area (p = 0.0068), more male gender (p = 0.0186), and more EF < 40% in patients with PPM. Survival at 58 months was 81 ± 6.4% and was not influenced by PPM (p = 0.9845). At Cox analysis only preoperative NYHA class (p = 0.0064) was identified as an independent risk factor for late death. The SF12 test was used to analyze the QOL of patients and it did not reveal differences between groups. CONCLUSIONS: PPM does not affect survival in this series of elderly patients. We believe that more aggressive surgical procedures are not justified in these patients.
    Journal of Cardiac Surgery 05/2013; · 1.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine the fate of the native aortic root after replacement of the ascending aorta to treat acute type A aortic dissection. METHODS: Between June 1985 and January 2010, 319 consecutive patients (mean age, 63 ± 11 years) with acute type A aortic dissection underwent replacement of the ascending aorta with preservation of the aortic root. The aortic valve was also replaced in 21 of these patients (7%). The intervention was extended to the aortic arch in 210 patients (66%), of whom 173 (54%) underwent hemiarch replacement, and 37 (12%), total arch replacement. RESULTS: There were 109 (34%) in-hospital deaths. Of the 210 discharged patients, survival was 95%, 58%, and 27% at 1, 10, and 23 years, respectively. Freedom from reoperation on the proximal aorta was reported by 97%, 92%, and 82% patients at 5, 10, and 23 years, respectively. Twelve patients were reoperated for aortic root dilatation and 2 died during reoperation. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed that significant risk factors for proximal reoperation were age <60 years (P = .005; relative risk, 1.94) and Marfan syndrome (P = .011; relative risk, 2.76). At follow-up, 15 patients (11%) had an aortic root diameter of >45 mm, but they were not reoperated. CONCLUSIONS: For acute type A aortic dissection, replacement of the ascending aorta with root preservation shows long-term effectiveness with low reoperation and aortic root dilatation rates.
    The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery 10/2012; · 3.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The study aim was to evaluate the fate of the aortic valve after root reconstruction in acute type A aortic dissection. Between 1982 and 2006, a total of 373 consecutive patients underwent emergency surgery for acute type A aortic dissection at the authors' institution. Of these patients, 298 (mean age 63 +/- 11 years; range: 22-85 years) underwent replacement of the supracoronary aorta with root reconstruction. The mean follow up period was 6.9 +/- 5.2 years (range: 2 months to 23 years), and was 98% complete. Aortic valve function was assessed by the incidence of aortic valve reoperation and transthoracic echocardiography. The 30-day mortality was 27% (82/298). Survival was 80%, 57% and 49% at five, 10 and 15 years, respectively. For survivors at the latest follow up, freedom from moderate or severe aortic regurgitation (AR) was 93%, 84% and 72% at five, 10 and 15 years, respectively. Four patients had severe AR but were not reoperated on. Among 200 patients discharged, 13 (6.5%) were reoperated on for severe AR, with an operative mortality of 15% (n = 2). Freedom from aortic valve replacement was 97%, 92% and 84% at five, 10 and 15 years, respectively. Cox regression analysis identified age < or = 59 years (p = 0.0201) and 'low-volume surgeon' (p = 0.0004) as risk factors for recurrent moderate or severe AR. The study results showed that, when the aortic dissection involves the aortic root, supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta with a root reconstruction allows preservation of the aortic valve in the majority of patients, with a satisfactory long-term outcome.
    The Journal of heart valve disease 09/2009; 18(5):507-13. · 1.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Management of octogenarian patients with acute type A acute aortic dissection is controversial. This study analyzed the surgical outcomes to identify patients who should undergo operations. Beginning January 2000, we established a registry including all octogenarian patients operated on for type A acute aortic dissection. We evaluated 57 consecutive patients enrolled up to December 2006. Their median age was 82 (range, 80 to 89 years). Compassionate indication operations were attempted in 2 moribund patients and in 5 presenting with shock associated with neurologic symptoms or renal failure, or both. Operations followed the standard procedure recommended in younger patients. Follow-up was 100% complete (mean, 3.9 +/- 2 years; range, 5 months to 8 years). There were 26 (45.6%) in-hospital and 6 late deaths. Multivariate analysis identified compassionate indication (p < or = 0.0001) and total arch replacement (p = 0.0060) as risk factors for in-hospital mortality. Postoperative complications occurred in 36 patients (69.2%) and were associated with a higher mortality (p = 0.0001). Overall survival was 51% at 1 year and 44% at 5 years. Excluding patients with compassionate indication and those who underwent total arch replacement, or both, overall survival was 66% at 1 year and 57% at 5 years. Surgical treatment for type A acute aortic dissection in octogenarians shows satisfactory midterm results among survivors. However, the high mortality rate imposes a requirement for better perioperative management. Compassionate cases should be managed medically. A less aggressive approach should improve outcomes of surgical treatment.
    The Annals of thoracic surgery 08/2009; 88(2):491-7. · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Outcomes after surgery for acute type A aortic dissection in the octogenarian are controversial. To analyze this issue further, the authors reviewed their experience in the hope of finding ways to improve results in these high-risk patients. Between April 1990 and November 2006, 319 consecutive patients underwent emergency surgery for acute type A aortic dissection at the San Martino University Hospital of Genoa (Italy). Among them, 23 (7%) patients were aged 80 years or older (mean age 82 years, range 80 to 86 years) and represent the study population. On admission 7 patients (30%) had preoperative shock, 1 needed cardiopulmonary resuscitation, 7 (30%) had a neurological deficit, 2 (9%) had acute renal failure. Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest was performed in 19 patients (83%). Surgical procedures included isolated replacement of the ascending aorta in all patients associated with root replacement in 2 (9%) and total aortic arch replacement in 5 (22%). Median follow up was 4.1 years (range 3 to 83 months). Hospital mortality was 61% (14 of 23 patients). Late mortality was 11% (1 of 9 survivors). Stepwise logistic regression identified the extension of surgery to the arch as independent risk factors for hospital death. Fourteen patients (61%) had 1 or more postoperative complications. Overall survival was 39+/-10% and 33+/-10% after 1 and 5 years respectively. Surgery for acute type A aortic dissection in the octogenarian shows high hospital mortality but satisfactory long-term survival among discharged patients. A less aggressive approach should increase the outcomes of surgically managed patients.
    The Journal of cardiovascular surgery 05/2009; 50(2):205-12. · 1.51 Impact Factor