Christine Simpson

University of Nottingham, Nottingham, ENG, United Kingdom

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Publications (9)0 Total impact

  • Julie McGarry, Selecia Kench, Christine Simpson
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    ABSTRACT: Nurses working in emergency departments (EDs) need specialist training to identify and respond appropriately to patients who have experienced domestic abuse (Gibbons 2011). This article describes the development of a domestic abuse nurse specialist role in an ED, a training programme for new ED staff and relevant resources for patients. It also outlines the results of an evaluation of the role and makes recommendations for service development.
    Emergency nurse: the journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association 06/2013; 21(3):16-8.
  • Julie McGarry, Christine Simpson
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    ABSTRACT: Elder abuse remains a significant problem nationally and globally. Early definitions of abuse, however, oversimplified the phenomena and while the complexity of elder abuse, in nature and scale, has also been growing recently there remains some confusion conceptually and in practice in terms of what is meant by and can be identified as abusive practice. The lack of conceptual clarity is evident across professional and agency boundaries. The authors suggest that a potential way forward is through the development of interprofessional learning as an integral part of education and training in respect of safeguarding older adults. This article highlights a number of complexities in the context of safeguarding and raises areas for further reflection and possible debate.
    Nursing older people 12/2012; 24(10):14-8.
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    Julie McGarry, Christine Simpson
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of domestic abuse on the health and lives of older women. Design/methodology/approach – A qualitative research design was used and data were collected using in-depth interviews with 16 older women who had experienced domestic abuse. The interviews varied between one and two hours in length and, with the participant's permission, all of the interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Analysis was undertaken utilising an iterative approach. In the present study all data were manually indexed and coded. Findings – The findings of this study illustrate that the consequences of domestic abuse for older women are far reaching, impacting significantly on the long-term health and emotional wellbeing of those affected. This paper also highlights that there is currently little available data regarding older women and domestic abuse within the particular context of health. This is increasingly being recognised as a significant deficit in awareness and understanding within society as a whole and, more particularly, for those responsible for support and care provision. Existing policy in this field and the implications for service development are also considered. Research limitations/implications – This is a small scale study and therefore there are limitations in terms of generalisability. Originality/value – This paper discusses the specific issues that arise for older women who have experienced domestic abuse within the particular context of health.
    Journal of Adult Protection, The 12/2011; 13(6):294-301.
  • Christine Simpson, Julie McGarry
    Nurse education in practice 11/2011; 12(1):1-2.
  • Julie McGarry, Christine Simpson, Mansour Mansour
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to explore older women's experience of domestic abuse and its effect on their health and lives. A qualitative research design was used and data were collected using in-depth interviews with 16 participants. The consequences of domestic abuse for older women have a significant effect on their long-term health and emotional wellbeing. There are little available data about older women and domestic abuse. This is increasingly being recognised as a significant deficit in awareness and understanding in society as a whole, and more particularly for those responsible for support and care provision.
    Nursing older people 06/2010; 22(5):33-7.
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to explore nursing students' experiences of caring for older people in practice and to examine the factors that affected their perceptions of working with these patients. A qualitative research design was used and data were collected by focus groups. Participants entered clinical placements early in their course with clear caring values, which formed a central part of their decision to enter nursing. However, early encounters and observations in the practice setting challenged these ideals. Positive learning environments should be developed that enable students to retain clear caring values and to realise the potential of caring practice while reconciling its demands.
    Nursing older people 09/2009; 21(7):16-22.
  • Julie McGarry, Christine Simpson
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    ABSTRACT: In 2000 the Department of Health published No Secrets: Guidance on developing and implementing multi-agency policies and procedures to protect vulnerable adults from abuse. This has laid the foundation for multi-agency policy development for the prevention of abuse of vulnerable adults at the national and local level. Recognition and appropriate action by community practitioners is essential to safeguard the welfare of older people. This paper aims to provide an overview of the key policy and research initiatives surrounding elder abuse, and to provide clear guidance in terms of identifying and reporting possible cases of abuse.
    British journal of community nursing 08/2009; 14(7):305-8.
  • Julie McGarry, Christine Simpson
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this article is to raise awareness of elder abuse as an issue and its changing policy and legislative context. It highlights nurses' roles and responsibilities, enabling the reader to explore the complexities that surround elder abuse as a phenomenon and recognise effective strategies for identifying, reporting and preventing elder abuse in the practice setting.
    Nursing standard: official newspaper of the Royal College of Nursing 01/2009; 22(46):49-55; quiz 56, 60.
  • Julie McGarry, Christine Simpson
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    ABSTRACT: This article describes the development of a learning resource designed to increase awareness of elder abuse among nursing students. The learning resource combines exercises, lectures, group work and the use of film. It encourages students to reflect on ways of identifying and preventing elder abuse in the increasingly wide range of settings where they are likely to work with older people.
    Nursing older people 03/2007; 19(2):27-30; quiz 31.