Huaqin Xu

University of Georgia, Атина, Georgia, United States

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Publications (2)8.35 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We have generated an ultra-high-density genetic map for lettuce, an economically important member of the Compositae, consisting of 12,842 unigenes (13,943 markers) mapped in 3,696 genetic bins distributed over nine chromosomal linkage groups. Genomic DNA was hybridized to a custom Affymetrix oligonucleotide array containing 6.4 million features representing 35,628 unigenes of Lactuca spp. Segregation of single-position polymorphisms was analyzed using 213 F7:8 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) that had been generated by crossing cultivated Lactuca sativa cv. Salinas and L. serriola acc. US96UC23, the wild progenitor species of L. sativa. The high level of replication of each allele in the recombinant inbred lines was exploited to identify single-position polymorphisms that were assigned to parental haplotypes. Marker information has been made available using GBrowse to facilitate access to the map. This map has been anchored to the previously published integrated map of lettuce providing candidate genes for multiple phenotypes. The high density of markers achieved in this ultra-dense map allowed syntenic studies between lettuce and Vitis vinifera as well as other plant species.
    G3-Genes Genomes Genetics 03/2013; · 1.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bacterial plant pathogens manipulate their hosts by injection of numerous effector proteins into host cells via type III secretion systems. Recognition of these effectors by the host plant leads to the induction of a defense reaction that often culminates in a hypersensitive response manifested as cell death. Genes encoding effector proteins can be exchanged between different strains of bacteria via horizontal transfer, and often individual strains are capable of infecting multiple hosts. Host plant species express diverse repertoires of resistance proteins that mediate direct or indirect recognition of bacterial effectors. As a result, plants and their bacterial pathogens should be considered as two extensive coevolving groups rather than as individual host species coevolving with single pathovars. To dissect the complexity of this coevolution, we cloned 171 effector-encoding genes from several pathovars of Pseudomonas and Ralstonia. We used Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient assays to test the ability of each effector to induce a necrotic phenotype on 59 plant genotypes belonging to four plant families, including numerous diverse accessions of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Known defense-inducing effectors (avirulence factors) and their homologs commonly induced extensive necrosis in many different plant species. Nonhost species reacted to multiple effector proteins from an individual pathovar more frequently and more intensely than host species. Both homologous and sequence-unrelated effectors could elicit necrosis in a similar spectrum of plants, suggesting common effector targets or targeting of the same pathways in the plant cell.
    Plant physiology 08/2009; 150(4):1733-49. · 6.56 Impact Factor