Mohammad Riazi

Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Teheran, Tehrān, Iran

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Publications (9)4.41 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Data suggest that the multifocal electroretinography (mfERG) may have a role in the assessment of patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). To explore the mfERG responses in patients with CRVO. mfERG responses were recorded at 61 discrete retinal locations from both eyes of 25 patients diagnosed with retinal vein occlusions within 3 weeks of onset. The latencies and amplitudes of average responses of 5 eccentric rings from 0 to 26 degrees relative to fixation, and grouped central and peripheral rings of involved eyes were compared with values obtained from 13 normal fellow eyes of these subjects. The mfERG responses obtained from eyes with CRVO were significantly different from those derived from the fellow eye, especially when the rings are grouped as central and peripheral. mfERG is a new, safe, non-invasive, and quick investigative tool to assess retinal function. Our results suggest that mfERG could be a useful electrophysiologic test in clinical evaluation and determination of the severity of underlying ischemia in patients with retinal vein occlusion. Further studies are needed to evaluate its role as a prognostic method to determine which eyes are prone to serious complications. This is the first report of mfERG results in Iran. Acta Medica Iranica 2007; 45(3): 209-214.
    07/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate and compare the effect of different doses of subconjunctival bevacizumab with betamethasone on the development of corneal major new vessels in a rat model of corneal chemical injury. The right eyes of 100 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 10 experimental groups (n = 10 per group). Chemical cauterization of the cornea was performed by using silver nitrate/potassium nitrate sticks. Immediately following corneal cauterization, the animals in groups 1-5 received subconjunctival injections of 0.02 ml of normal saline (control A), betamethasone LA (6 mg/ml) and different doses of bevacizumab (1, 5 and 25 mg/ml), respectively. In another experiment, the animals in groups 6-10 received subconjunctival injections of 0.02 ml of normal saline (control B), betamethasone LA (6 mg/ml) and different doses of bevacizumab (1, 5 and 25 mg/ml), respectively, 7 days following corneal cauterization. The numbers of major thick-walled vessels originating from the limbus reaching the corneal scar were counted 7 days after corneal cauterization in groups 1-5 and 14 days after corneal cauterization in groups 6-10. The number of major vessels in groups 1-5 was 19.63 +/- 3.77, 17.25 +/- 5.33, 16.10 +/- 5.02, 12.89 +/- 2.70 and 12.36 +/- 4.45 when assessed 7 days after corneal cauterization, respectively. Administration of betamethasone in group 2 had no significant effect on the corneal major vessel count compared to control A. The number of major vessels in groups 4 and 5 (bevacizumab 5 and 25 mg/ml) was significantly lower than that of group 1 (p < 0.01, Student's t test). The number of vessels in groups 6-10 was 12.55 +/- 5.64, 11.30 +/- 9.33, 5.50 +/- 6.34, 2.73 +/- 4.73 and 2.67 +/- 3.77 when assessed 14 days after corneal cauterization, respectively. Subconjunctival administration of betamethasone 7 days after corneal cauterization did not reduce the amount of corneal major vessels compared to control B. Administration of 0.02 ml of bevacizumab in doses of 1, 5 and 25 mg/ml 7 days after corneal cauterization significantly reduced the amount of major vessels compared to group 6 (p = 0.01, p < 0.01 and p < 0.01, respectively). There was no significant difference in percent area of corneal scar between different groups. Single subconjunctival injection of bevacizumab is efficacious in the prevention of formation as well as regression of major vessels compared to betamethasone in this rat model of corneal neovascularization. Even lower doses of bevacizumab might be efficacious.
    Ophthalmic Research 06/2009; 42(2):90-5. · 1.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Contrast sensitivity is an important aspect of visual function and is even more important for ordinary daily tasks than visual acuity. Contrast sensitivity function may be deteriorated to a significant level in diabetic retinopathy, especially in diabetic macular edema. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of macular laser photocoagulation-as the standard treatment of clinically significant macular edema-on contrast sensitivity function. In a prospective noncomparative interventional case series, 17 patients with clinically significant bilateral macular edema and no history of prior macular laser photocoagulation were enrolled. Baseline visual acuity, contrast sensitivity function, and fluorescein angiography were obtained and reassessed three months after macular laser photocoagulation. Clinically significant macular edema resolved in 22 (65%) of 34 eyes, three months after their first session of macular laser photocoagulation. The mean pretreatment visual acuity was 24.5/40 (0.21 logMAR) +/-10.3/40. Three months after macular photocoagulation, visual acuity remained stable in 19 eyes, decreased in 12 eyes, and increased in three eyes. The mean post-treatment visual acuity was 24/40 (0.24 logMAR) +/-10.8/40. There was a statistically significant (P = 0.02) decrease in visual acuity following laser therapy. In subgroup analysis, this decrease in visual acuity was only observed in those with unresolved clinically significant macular edema. The mean contrast sensitivity threshold increased in all spatial frequencies by three months after macular photocoagulation. The maximum rise was observed in the frequency of 6.4 cycles per degree in the mid range of frequencies, with a pretreatment mean of 9.41 dB and a post-treatment mean of 11.50 dB (P<0.05). Contrast sensitivity function improved after macular laser photocoagulation in clinically significant macular edema patients.
    Archives of Iranian medicine 03/2008; 11(2):143-7. · 1.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the effect of prophylactic subthreshold laser macular grid photocoagulation on drusen area and to evaluate the visual outcome and incidence of choroidal neovascularization in patients with soft drusen maculopathy. In a nonrandomized nonmasked clinical trial, 18 patients (36 eyes) with bilateral soft drusen maculopathy were studied. For each patient, one eye was treated with 48 subthreshold (invisible end-point) applications of 532-nm KTP-laser in a macular grid pattern and the fellow eye was observed. Soft drusen areas were calculated and compared between the two groups at baseline and follow-up visits at 3, 6, 12, and 30 months of therapy. Best corrected visual acuity was also compared in observed and laser-treated eyes. Reduction of drusen area, change in visual acuity, and rate of CNV were assessed in both groups. At baseline, there was no significant difference in the mean drusen surface area between the two groups (P = 0.90). The mean surface area of soft drusen in treated eyes was 6.51 mm(2) after 30 months and 7.58 mm(2) (P = 0.50) in the control eyes. There was a trend towards reduction in the mean soft drusen area after 30 months from baseline in laser-treated eyes (6.51 vs. 6.97 mm(2)). In treated eyes, there was no statistically significant difference between the mean best corrected visual acuity at the baseline (0.28 logMAR) and after 30 months (0.32 logMAR) (P = 0.40). Subthreshold macular grid photocoagulation with 532-nm KTP-laser did not seem to reduce drusen surface area significantly and did not improve best corrected visual acuity after 30 months. No exudative lesion developed in laser-treated eyes.
    Archives of Iranian medicine 02/2007; 10(1):14-9. · 1.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A young woman with severe visual loss, diplopia, bilateral optic nerve swelling, subhyaloid hemorrhage, and vasculitis was diagnosed with brucellosis. Clinical and ocular findings, except optic disc atrophy, improved within 3 months after antibrucellar treatment. These findings expand the ocular manifestations of brucellosis, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of optic neuritis, subhyaloid hemorrhage, vasculitis, and optic disc atrophy.
    Annals of Ophthalmology 01/2005; 37(4):291-294. · 0.16 Impact Factor
  • Annals of Ophthalmology 01/2005; · 0.16 Impact Factor
  • Iranian Journal of Ophthalmology 01/2003; 15:101-105. · 0.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Contrast sensitivity is an important aspect of visual function and is even more important for ordinary daily tasks than visual acuity. Contrast sensitivity function may be deteriorated to a significant level in diabetic retinopathy, especially in diabetic macular edema. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of macular laser photocoagulation—as the standard treatment of clinically significant macular edema—on contrast sensitivity function. Methods: In a prospective noncomparative interventional case series, 17 patients with clinically significant bilateral macular edema and no history of prior macular laser photocoagulation were enrolled. Baseline visual acuity, contrast sensitivity function, and fluorescein angiography were obtained and reassessed three months after macular laser photocoagulation. Results: Clinically significant macular edema resolved in 22 (65%) of 34 eyes, three months after their first session of macular laser photocoagulation. The mean pretreatment visual acuity was 24.5/40 (0.21 logMAR) ±10.3/40. Three months after macular photocoagulation, visual acuity remained stable in 19 eyes, decreased in 12 eyes, and increased in three eyes. The mean post- treatment visual acuity was 24/40 (0.24 logMAR) ±10.8/40. There was a statistically significant (P = 0.02) decrease in visual acuity following laser therapy. In subgroup analysis, this decrease in visual acuity was only observed in those with unresolved clinically significant macular edema. The mean contrast sensitivity threshold increased in all spatial frequencies by three months after macular photocoagulation. The maximum rise was observed in the frequency of 6.4 cycles per degree in the mid range of frequencies, with a pretreatment mean of 9.41 dB and a post-treatment mean of 11.50 dB (P
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to compare the anatomic and visual outcome of primary vitrectomy with scleral buckling in patients with retinal detachment following cataract surgery. Fifty-six consecutive patients with retinal detachment after cataract surgery were randomly assigned to two treatment groups: standard scleral buckling and standard three-port deep vitrectomy. Successful treatment was defined as improvement in vision (minimum of 2 lines in Snellen chart), anatomic reattachment and prevention of post-operative proliferative vitreo-retinopathy (PVR). The prognostic role of pre-operative and intra-operative conditions of the affected eye was also evaluated. Twenty-six of fifty-six eligible patients underwent scleral buckling and thirty had deep vitrectomy. Anatomic reattachment was achieved in 18 (69.2%) cases in scleral buckling group and 19 (63%) cases in vitrectomy group. Improvement in visual acuity was achieved in 76.9% and 83.3% and PVR occurred post-operatively in 23.1% and 16.7%, respectively. The differences were not statistically significant, and pre- and intra-operative ocular conditions did not prove to be prognostic factors, either. Scleral buckling and primary deep vitrectomy seem to have comparable outcomes in terms of anatomic reattachment and visual improvement in patients with pseudophakic and aphakic retinal detachment. Failure to achieve anatomic reattachment and visual improvement or PVR occurred in about one third and one fifth of the cases respectively, irrespective of the technique used. This warrants further research to improve treatment results. Acta Medica Iranica, 42(2): 114-121; 2004