Gil D Rabinovici

University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California, United States

Are you Gil D Rabinovici?

Claim your profile

Publications (64)379.12 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Elevated CSF τ is considered a biomarker of neuronal injury in newly developed Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) criteria. However, previous studies have failed to detect alterations of τ species in other primary tauopathies. We assessed CSF τ protein abnormalities in AD, a tauopathy with prominent Aβ pathology, and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), a primary tauopathy characterised by deposition of four microtubule-binding repeat (4R) τ with minimal Aβ pathology.
    Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry. 06/2014;
  • Robert Laforce, Gil D Rabinovici
    Canadian Medical Association Journal 01/2014; · 6.47 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The relationships between clinical phenotype, β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition and neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are incompletely understood yet have important ramifications for future therapy. The goal of this study was to utilize multimodality positron emission tomography (PET) data from a clinically heterogeneous population of patients with probable AD in order to: (1) identify spatial patterns of Aβ deposition measured by (11C)-labeled Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB-PET) and glucose metabolism measured by FDG-PET that correlate with specific clinical presentation, and (2) explore associations between spatial patterns of Aβ deposition and glucose metabolism across the AD population. We included all patients meeting criteria for probable AD (NIA-AA) who had undergone MRI, PiB and FDG-PET at our center (N = 46, mean age 63.0 ± 7.7, Mini-Mental State Examination 22.0 ± 4.8). Patients were subclassified based on their cognitive profiles into an amnestic/dysexecutive group (AD-memory; n = 27), a language-predominant group (AD-language; n = 10) and a visuospatial-predominant group (AD-visuospatial; n = 9). All patients were required to have evidence of amyloid deposition on PiB-PET. To capture the spatial distribution of Aβ deposition and glucose metabolism, we employed parallel independent components analysis (pICA), a method that enables joint analyses of multimodal imaging data. The relationships between PET components and clinical group were examined using a Receiver Operator Characteristic approach, including age, gender, education and apolipoprotein E ε4 allele carrier status as covariates. Results of the first set of analyses independently examining the relationship between components from each modality and clinical group showed three significant components for FDG: a left inferior frontal and temporoparietal component associated with AD-language (area under the curve [AUC] 0.82, p = 0.011), and two components associated with AD-visuospatial (bilateral occipito-parieto-temporal [AUC 0.85, p = 0.009] and right posterior cingulate cortex [PCC]/precuneus and right lateral parietal [AUC 0.69, p = 0.045]). The AD-memory associated component included predominantly bilateral inferior frontal, cuneus and inferior temporal, and right inferior parietal hypometabolism but did not reach significance (AUC 0.65, p = 0.062). None of the PiB components correlated with clinical group. Joint analysis of PiB and FDG with pICA revealed a correlated component pair, in which increased frontal and decreased PCC/precuneus PiB correlated with decreased FDG in frontal, occipital and temporal regions (partial r = 0.75, p < 0.0001). Using multivariate data analysis, this study reinforced the notion that clinical phenotype in AD is tightly linked to patterns of glucose hypometabolism but not amyloid deposition. These findings are strikingly similar to those of univariate paradigms and provide additional support in favor of specific involvement of the language network, higher-order visual network, and default mode network in clinical variants of AD. The inverse relationship between Aβ deposition and glucose metabolism in partially overlapping brain regions suggest that Aβ may exert both local and remote effects on brain metabolism. Applying multivariate approaches such as pICA to multimodal imaging data is a promising approach for unraveling the complex relationships between different elements of AD pathophysiology.
    NeuroImage: Clinical. 01/2014;
  • Source
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the effect of amyloid imaging on clinical decision making. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 140 cognitively impaired patients (mean age 65.0 years, 46% primary β-amyloid (Aβ) diagnosis, mean Mini-Mental State Examination 22.3) who underwent amyloid (Pittsburgh compound B [PiB]) PET as part of observational research studies and were evaluated clinically before and after the scan. One hundred thirty-four concurrently underwent fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET. We assessed for changes between the pre- and post-PET clinical diagnosis (from Aβ to non-Aβ diagnosis or vice versa) and Alzheimer disease treatment plan. The association between PiB/FDG results and changes in management was evaluated using χ(2) and multivariate logistic regression. Postmortem diagnosis was available for 24 patients (17%). Concordance between scan results and baseline diagnosis was high (PiB 84%, FDG 82%). The primary diagnosis changed after PET in 13/140 patients (9%) overall but in 5/13 (38%) patients considered pre-PET diagnostic dilemmas. When examined independently, discordant PiB and discordant FDG were both associated with diagnostic change (unadjusted p < 0.0001). However, when examined together in a multivariate logistic regression, only discordant PiB remained significant (adjusted p = 0.00013). Changes in treatment were associated with discordant PiB in patients with non-Aβ diagnoses (adjusted p = 0.028), while FDG had no effect on therapy. Both PiB (96%) and FDG (91%) showed high agreement with autopsy diagnosis. PET had a moderate effect on clinical outcomes. Discordant PiB had a greater effect than discordant FDG, and influence on diagnosis was greater than on treatment. Prospective studies are needed to better characterize the clinical role of amyloid PET.
    Neurology 12/2013; · 8.25 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present longitudinal clinical, cognitive, and neuroimaging data from a 63-year-old woman who enrolled in research as a normal control and evolved posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) over 5 year follow-up. At baseline she reported only subtle difficulty driving and performed normally on cognitive tests, but already demonstrated atrophy in left visual association cortex. With follow-up she developed insidiously progressive visuospatial and visuoperceptual deficits, correlating with progressive atrophy in bilateral visual areas. Amyloid PET was positive. This case tracks the evolution of PCA from the prodromal stage, and illustrates challenges to early diagnosis as well as the utility of imaging biomarkers.
    Neurocase 12/2013; · 1.05 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurofilament light chain (NfL) concentration is elevated in neurological disorders including frontotemporal degeneration (FTD). We investigated the clinical correlates of elevated CSF NfL levels in FTD. Methods CSF NfL, amyloid-β42 (Aβ42), tau and phosphorylated tau (ptau) concentrations were compared in 47 normal controls (NC), 8 asymptomatic gene carriers (NC2) of FTD-causing mutations, 79 FTD (45 behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia [bvFTD], 18 progressive nonfluent aphasia [PNFA], 16 semantic dementia [SD]), 22 progressive supranuclear palsy, 50 Alzheimer's disease, 6 Parkinson's disease and 17 corticobasal syndrome patients. Correlations between CSF analyte levels were performed with neuropsychological measures and the Clinical Dementia Rating scale sum of boxes (CDRsb). Voxel-based morphometry of structural MR images determined the relationship between brain volume and CSF NfL. Results Mean CSF NfL concentrations were higher in bvFTD, SD and PNFA than other groups. NfL in NC2 was similar to NC. CSF NfL, but not other CSF measures, correlated with CDRsb and neuropsychological measures in FTD, and not in other diagnostic groups. Analyses in two independent FTD cohorts and a group of autopsy verified or biomarker enriched cases confirmed the larger group analysis. In FTD, gray and white matter volume negatively correlated with CSF NfL concentration, such that individuals with highest NfL levels exhibited the most atrophy. Interpretation CSF NfL is elevated in symptomatic FTD and correlates with disease severity. This measurement may be a useful surrogate endpoint of disease severity in FTD clinical trials. Longitudinal studies of CSF NfL in FTD are warranted. ANN NEUROL 2013. © 2013 American Neurological Association.
    Annals of Neurology 11/2013; · 11.19 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE Criteria for preclinical Alzheimer disease (AD) propose β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques to initiate neurodegeneration within AD-affected regions. However, some cognitively normal older individuals harbor neural injury similar to patients with AD, without concurrent Aβ burden. Such findings challenge the proposed sequence and suggest that Aβ-independent precursors underlie AD-typical neurodegenerative patterns. OBJECTIVE To examine relationships between Aβ and non-Aβ factors as well as neurodegeneration within AD regions in cognitively normal older adults. The study quantified neurodegenerative abnormalities using imaging biomarkers and examined cross-sectional relationships with Aβ deposition; white matter lesions (WMLs), a marker of cerebrovascular disease; and cognitive functions. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional study in a community-based convenience sample of 72 cognitively normal older individuals (mean [SD] age, 74.9 [5.7] years; 48 women; mean [SD] 17.0 [1.9] years of education) of the Berkeley Aging Cohort. INTERVENTION Each individual underwent a standardized neuropsychological test session, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography scanning. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES For each individual, 3 AD-sensitive neurodegeneration biomarkers were measured: hippocampal volume, glucose metabolism, and gray matter thickness, the latter 2 sampled from cortical AD-affected regions. To quantify neurodegenerative abnormalities, each biomarker was age adjusted, dichotomized into a normal or abnormal status (using cutoff thresholds derived from an independent AD sample), and summarized into 0, 1, or more than 1 abnormal neurodegenerative biomarker. Degree and topographic patterns of neurodegenerative abnormalities were assessed and their relationships with cognitive functions, WML volume, and Aβ deposition (quantified using carbon 11-labeled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography). RESULTS Of our cognitively normal elderly individuals, 40% (n = 29) displayed at least 1 abnormal neurodegenerative biomarker, 26% (n = 19) of whom had no evidence of elevated Pittsburgh compound B retention. In those people who were classified as having abnormal cortical thickness, degree and topographic specificity of neurodegenerative abnormalities were similar to patients with AD. Accumulation of neurodegenerative abnormalities was related to poor memory and executive functions as well as larger WML volumes but not elevated Pittsburgh compound B retention. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our study confirms that a substantial proportion of cognitively normal older adults harbor neurodegeneration, without Aβ burden. Associations of neurodegenerative abnormalities with cerebrovascular disease and cognitive performance indicate that neurodegenerative pathology can emerge through non-Aβ pathways within regions most affected by AD.
    JAMA Neurology 10/2013; · 7.58 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Primary progressive aphasia is a neurodegenerative clinical syndrome that presents in adulthood with an isolated, progressive language disorder. Three main clinical/anatomical variants have been described, each associated with distinctive pathology. A high frequency of neurodevelopmental learning disability in primary progressive aphasia has been reported. Because the disorder is heterogeneous with different patterns of cognitive, anatomical and biological involvement, we sought to identify whether learning disability had a predilection for one or more of the primary progressive aphasia subtypes. We screened the University of California San Francisco Memory and Aging Center's primary progressive aphasia cohort (n = 198) for history of language-related learning disability as well as hand preference, which has associations with learning disability. The study included logopenic (n = 48), non-fluent (n = 54) and semantic (n = 96) variant primary progressive aphasias. We investigated whether the presence of learning disability or non-right-handedness was associated with differential effects on demographic, neuropsychological and neuroimaging features of primary progressive aphasia. We showed that a high frequency of learning disability was present only in the logopenic group (χ(2) = 15.17, P < 0.001) and (χ(2) = 11.51, P < 0.001) compared with semantic and non-fluent populations. In this group, learning disability was associated with earlier onset of disease, more isolated language symptoms, and more focal pattern of left posterior temporoparietal atrophy. Non-right-handedness was instead over-represented in the semantic group, at nearly twice the prevalence of the general population (χ(2) = 6.34, P = 0.01). Within semantic variant primary progressive aphasia the right-handed and non-right-handed cohorts appeared homogeneous on imaging, cognitive profile, and structural analysis of brain symmetry. Lastly, the non-fluent group showed no increase in learning disability or non-right-handedness. Logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia and developmental dyslexia both manifest with phonological disturbances and posterior temporal involvement. Learning disability might confer vulnerability of this network to early-onset, focal Alzheimer's pathology. Left-handedness has been described as a proxy for atypical brain hemispheric lateralization. As non-right-handedness was increased only in the semantic group, anomalous lateralization mechanisms might instead be related to frontotemporal lobar degeneration with abnormal TARDBP. Taken together, this study suggests that neurodevelopmental signatures impart differential trajectories towards neurodegenerative disease.
    Brain 09/2013; · 9.92 Impact Factor
  • Gil D Rabinovici, Bradley F Boeve
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Converging evidence suggests that neurodegenerative diseases have a prolonged preclinical phase during which pathophysiology is in motion but clinical symptoms are not yet apparent. The preclinical stage is defined by imaging and biological markers that detect disease-related molecular, functional, and structural changes prior to the onset of even subtle neurologic deficits.(1) Autosomal dominant forms of disease are particularly useful for characterizing the preclinical phase, as gene carriers can be studied while asymptomatic and followed longitudinally. Indeed, individuals who carry mutations that cause autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (AD) demonstrate AD-like imaging and biomarker changes 20 years or more before the expected onset of symptoms.(2) Asymptomatic AD gene carriers are being enrolled in clinical trials to test whether pharmacologic interventions at this very early stage can slow the pathophysiologic cascade and delay symptom onset. If successful, these trials could lead to a paradigm shift in how we diagnose and treat neurodegenerative disease.
    Neurology 09/2013; · 8.25 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Apolipoprotein E ε4 (ApoE4) has been associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid deposition and hypometabolism. ApoE4 is less prevalent in non-amnestic AD variants suggesting a direct effect on the clinical phenotype. However, the impact of ApoE4 on amyloid burden and glucose metabolism across different clinical AD syndromes is not well understood. We aimed to assess the relationship between amyloid deposition, glucose metabolism and ApoE4 genotype in a clinically heterogeneous population of AD patients. 52 patients with probable AD (National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association) underwent [(11)C]Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) and [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scans. All patients had positive PIB-PET scans. 23 were ApoE4 positive (ApoE4+) (14 heterozygous and 9 homozygous) and 29 were ApoE4 negative (ApoE4-). Groups consisted of language-variant AD, visual-variant AD and AD patients with amnestic and dysexecutive deficits. 52 healthy controls were included for comparison. FDG and PIB uptake was compared between groups on a voxel-wise basis and in regions of interest. While PIB patterns were diffuse in both patient groups, ApoE4- patients showed higher PIB uptake than ApoE4+ patients across the cortex. Higher PIB uptake in ApoE4- patients was particularly significant in right lateral frontotemporal regions. In contrast, similar patterns of hypometabolism relative to controls were found in both patient groups, mainly involving lateral temporoparietal cortex, precuneus, posterior cingulate cortex and middle frontal gyrus. Comparing patient groups, ApoE4+ subjects showed greater hypometabolism in bilateral medial temporal and right lateral temporal regions, and ApoE4- patients showed greater hypometabolism in cortical areas, including supplementary motor cortex and superior frontal gyrus. ApoE4+ AD patients showed lower global amyloid burden and greater medial temporal hypometabolism compared with matched ApoE4- patients. These findings suggest that ApoE4 may increase susceptibility to molecular pathology and modulate the anatomic pattern of neurodegeneration in AD.
    Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry 08/2013; · 4.87 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Revised diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer disease (AD) acknowledge a key role of imaging biomarkers for early diagnosis. Diagnostic accuracy depends on which marker (i.e., amyloid imaging, ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose [FDG]-PET, SPECT, MRI) as well as how it is measured ("metric": visual, manual, semiautomated, or automated segmentation/computation). We evaluated diagnostic accuracy of marker vs metric in separating AD from healthy and prognostic accuracy to predict progression in mild cognitive impairment. The outcome measure was positive (negative) likelihood ratio, LR+ (LR-), defined as the ratio between the probability of positive (negative) test outcome in patients and the probability of positive (negative) test outcome in healthy controls. Diagnostic LR+ of markers was between 4.4 and 9.4 and LR- between 0.25 and 0.08, whereas prognostic LR+ and LR- were between 1.7 and 7.5, and 0.50 and 0.11, respectively. Within metrics, LRs varied up to 100-fold: LR+ from approximately 1 to 100; LR- from approximately 1.00 to 0.01. Markers accounted for 11% and 18% of diagnostic and prognostic variance of LR+ and 16% and 24% of LR-. Across all markers, metrics accounted for an equal or larger amount of variance than markers: 13% and 62% of diagnostic and prognostic variance of LR+, and 29% and 18% of LR-. Within markers, the largest proportion of diagnostic LR+ and LR- variability was within ¹⁸F-FDG-PET and MRI metrics, respectively. Diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of imaging AD biomarkers is at least as dependent on how the biomarker is measured as on the biomarker itself. Standard operating procedures are key to biomarker use in the clinical routine and drug trials.
    Neurology 07/2013; 81(5):487-500. · 8.25 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE Epileptic activity associated with Alzheimer disease (AD) deserves increased attention because it has a harmful impact on these patients, can easily go unrecognized and untreated, and may reflect pathogenic processes that also contribute to other aspects of the illness. We report key features of AD-related seizures and epileptiform activity that are instructive for clinical practice and highlight similarities between AD and transgenic animal models of the disease. OBJECTIVE To describe common clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) or early AD who also have epilepsy or subclinical epileptiform activity. DESIGN Retrospective observational study from 2007 to 2012. SETTING Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco. PATIENTS We studied 54 patients with a diagnosis of aMCI plus epilepsy (n = 12), AD plus epilepsy (n = 35), and AD plus subclinical epileptiform activity (n = 7). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Clinical and demographic data, electroencephalogram (EEG) readings, and treatment responses to antiepileptic medications. RESULTS Patients with aMCI who had epilepsy presented with symptoms of cognitive decline 6.8 years earlier than patients with aMCI who did not have epilepsy (64.3 vs 71.1 years; P = .02). Patients with AD who had epilepsy presented with cognitive decline 5.5 years earlier than patients with AD who did not have epilepsy (64.8 vs 70.3 years; P = .001). Patients with AD who had subclinical epileptiform activity also had an early onset of cognitive decline (58.9 years). The timing of seizure onset in patients with aMCI and AD was nonuniform (P < .001), clustering near the onset of cognitive decline. Epilepsies were most often complex partial seizures (47%) and more than half were nonconvulsive (55%). Serial or extended EEG monitoring appeared to be more effective than routine EEG at detecting interictal and subclinical epileptiform activity. Epileptic foci were predominantly unilateral and temporal. Of the most commonly prescribed antiepileptics, treatment outcomes appeared to be better for lamotrigine and levetiracetam than for phenytoin. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Common clinical features of patients with aMCI- or AD-associated epilepsy at our center included early age at onset of cognitive decline, early incidence of seizures in the disease course, unilateral temporal epileptic foci detected by serial/extended EEG, transient cognitive dysfunction, and good seizure control and tolerability with lamotrigine and levetiracetam. Careful identification and treatment of epilepsy in such patients may improve their clinical course.
    JAMA neurology. 07/2013;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although previous studies have emphasized the vulnerability of the default mode network (DMN) in Alzheimer's disease (AD), little is known about the involvement of other functional networks and their relationship to clinical phenotype. To test whether clinicoanatomic heterogeneity in AD is driven by the involvement of specific networks, network connectivity was assessed in healthy subjects by seeding regions commonly and specifically atrophied in three clinical AD variants: early-onset AD (age at onset, <65 y; memory and executive deficits), logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia (language deficits), and posterior cortical atrophy (visuospatial deficits). Four-millimeter seed regions of interest were used to obtain intrinsic connectivity maps in 131 healthy controls (age, 65.5 ± 3.5 y). Atrophy patterns in independent cohorts of AD variant patients and their correspondence to connectivity networks in controls were also assessed. The connectivity maps of commonly atrophied regions of interest support posterior DMN and precuneus network involvement across AD variants, whereas seeding regions specifically atrophied in each AD variant revealed distinct, syndrome-specific connectivity patterns. Goodness-of-fit analysis of each connectivity map with network templates showed the highest correspondence between the early-onset AD seed connectivity map and anterior salience and right executive-control networks, the logopenic aphasia seed connectivity map and the language network, and the posterior cortical atrophy seed connectivity map and the higher visual network. Connectivity maps derived from controls matched regions commonly and specifically atrophied in the patients. Our findings indicate that the posterior DMN and precuneus network are commonly affected in AD variants, whereas syndrome-specific neurodegenerative patterns are driven by the involvement of specific networks outside the DMN.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 06/2013; · 9.74 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE Mutations in the progranulin gene are known to cause diverse clinical syndromes, all attributed to frontotemporal lobar degeneration. We describe 2 patients with progranulin gene mutations and evidence of Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology. We also conducted a literature review. OBSERVATIONS This study focused on case reports of 2 unrelated patients with progranulin mutations at the University of California, San Francisco, Memory and Aging Center. One patient presented at age 65 years with a clinical syndrome suggestive of AD and showed evidence of amyloid aggregation on positron emission tomography. Another patient presented at age 54 years with logopenic progressive aphasia and, at autopsy, showed both frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 inclusions and AD. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In addition to autosomal-dominant frontotemporal lobar degeneration, mutations in the progranulin gene may be a risk factor for AD clinical phenotypes and neuropathology.
    JAMA neurology. 04/2013;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: β-Amyloid (Aβ) plaque deposition and neurodegeneration within temporoparietal and hippocampal regions may indicate increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study examined relationships between AD biomarkers of Aβ and neurodegeneration as well as cognitive performance in cognitively normal older individuals. Aβ burden was quantified in 72 normal older human subjects from the Berkeley Aging Cohort (BAC) using [(11)C] Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) positron emission tomography. In the same individuals, we measured hippocampal volume, as well as glucose metabolism and cortical thickness, which were extracted from a template of cortical AD-affected regions. The three functional and structural biomarkers were merged into a highly AD-sensitive multimodality biomarker reflecting neural integrity. In the normal older individuals, there was no association between elevated PIB uptake and either the single-modality or the multimodality neurodegenerative biomarkers. Lower neural integrity within the AD-affected regions and a control area (the visual cortex) was related to lower scores on memory and executive function tests; the same association was not found with PIB retention. The relationship between cognition and the multimodality AD biomarker was stronger in individuals with the highest PIB uptake. The findings indicate that neurodegeneration occurs within AD regions regardless of Aβ deposition and accounts for worse cognition in cognitively normal older people. The impact of neural integrity on cognitive functions is, however, enhanced in the presence of high Aβ burden for brain regions that are most affected in AD.
    Journal of Neuroscience 03/2013; 33(13):5553-5563. · 6.91 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recently, Coppola and colleagues demonstrated that a rare microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) sequence variant, c.454G>A (p.A152T) significantly increases the risk of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) spectrum disorders and Alzheimer disease (AD) in a screen of 15,369 subjects. We describe clinical features of 9 patients with neurodegenerative disease (4 women) harboring p.A152T, aged 51 to 79 years at symptom onset. Seven developed FTD spectrum clinical syndromes, including progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome (n=2), behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD, n=1), nonfluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA, n=2), and corticobasal syndrome (n=2); 2 patients were diagnosed with clinical AD. Thus, MAPT p.A152T is associated with a variety of FTD spectrum clinical presentations, although patients with clinical AD are also identified. These data warrant larger studies with clinicopathologic correlation to elucidate the influence of this genetic variant on neurodegenerative disease.
    Alzheimer disease and associated disorders 03/2013; · 2.88 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterised by impaired sentence repetition and word retrieval difficulties. Post mortem studies, amyloid imaging and CSF tau/Aβ measurements suggest Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology as the underlying cause. Relatively little is known about patterns of progression in patients with the logopenic variant of PPA. 21 patients (3 with post mortem confirmation of AD and 5 with positive amyloid PIB-PET scans) were studied with longitudinal T1-weighted MR imaging (mean interscan interval 1.2years) using volumetric analysis and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Baseline imaging showed asymmetrical (left greater than right) involvement of the posterior superior temporal and inferior parietal lobes as well as posterior cingulate and medial temporal lobes. The whole brain rate of volume loss was 2.0% per year with a greater rate of left hemisphere atrophy (2.3%/year) than right hemisphere (1.6%/year). Longitudinal VBM analysis showed increasing involvement of other areas in the left hemisphere (temporal, parietal, frontal and caudate) and atrophy of areas in the right hemisphere that had been involved earlier in the disease in the left hemisphere, particularly posterior cingulate/precuneus. With disease progression there was worsening of anomia, sentence repetition and sentence comprehension but consistent with the spread of imaging changes also deficits in single word comprehension, single word repetition and verbal memory. This study shows that the logopenic variant of PPA remains an asymmetrical disease, with spread through the left hemisphere language network but also involvement to a lesser degree of regions in the right hemisphere that mirror the earlier left hemisphere changes.
    Brain and Language 02/2013; · 3.39 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The factors driving clinical heterogeneity in Alzheimer's disease are not well understood. This study assessed the relationship between amyloid deposition, glucose metabolism and clinical phenotype in Alzheimer's disease, and investigated how these relate to the involvement of functional networks. The study included 17 patients with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (age at onset <65 years), 12 patients with logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia and 13 patients with posterior cortical atrophy [whole Alzheimer's disease group: age = 61.5 years (standard deviation 6.5 years), 55% male]. Thirty healthy control subjects [age = 70.8 (3.3) years, 47% male] were also included. Subjects underwent positron emission tomography with (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B and (18)F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose. All patients met National Institute on Ageing-Alzheimer's Association criteria for probable Alzheimer's disease and showed evidence of amyloid deposition on (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography. We hypothesized that hypometabolism patterns would differ across variants, reflecting involvement of specific functional networks, whereas amyloid patterns would be diffuse and similar across variants. We tested these hypotheses using three complimentary approaches: (i) mass-univariate voxel-wise group comparison of (18)F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose and (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B; (ii) generation of covariance maps across all subjects with Alzheimer's disease from seed regions of interest specifically atrophied in each variant, and comparison of these maps to functional network templates; and (iii) extraction of (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B and (18)F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose values from functional network templates. Alzheimer's disease clinical groups showed syndrome-specific (18)F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose patterns, with greater parieto-occipital involvement in posterior cortical atrophy, and asymmetric involvement of left temporoparietal regions in logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia. In contrast, all Alzheimer's disease variants showed diffuse patterns of (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B binding, with posterior cortical atrophy additionally showing elevated uptake in occipital cortex compared with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. The seed region of interest covariance analysis revealed distinct (18)F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose correlation patterns that greatly overlapped with the right executive-control network for the early-onset Alzheimer's disease region of interest, the left language network for the logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia region of interest, and the higher visual network for the posterior cortical atrophy region of interest. In contrast, (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B covariance maps for each region of interest were diffuse. Finally, (18)F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose was similarly reduced in all Alzheimer's disease variants in the dorsal and left ventral default mode network, whereas significant differences were found in the right ventral default mode, right executive-control (both lower in early-onset Alzheimer's disease and posterior cortical atrophy than logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia) and higher-order visual network (lower in posterior cortical atrophy than in early-onset Alzheimer's disease and logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia), with a trend towards lower (18)F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose also found in the left language network in logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia. There were no differences in (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B binding between syndromes in any of the networks. Our data suggest that Alzheimer's disease syndromes are associated with degeneration of specific functional networks, and that fibrillar amyloid-β deposition explains at most a small amount of the clinico-anatomic heterogeneity in Alzheimer's disease.
    Brain 01/2013; · 9.92 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a clinicoradiologic syndrome characterized by progressive decline in visual processing skills, relatively intact memory and language in the early stages, and atrophy of posterior brain regions. Misdiagnosis of PCA is common, owing not only to its relative rarity and unusual and variable presentation, but also because patients frequently first seek the opinion of an ophthalmologist, who may note normal eye examinations by their usual tests but may not appreciate cortical brain dysfunction. Seeking to raise awareness of the disease, stimulate research, and promote collaboration, a multidisciplinary group of PCA research clinicians formed an international working party, which had its first face-to-face meeting on July 13, 2012 in Vancouver, Canada, prior to the Alzheimer's Association International Conference.
    Alzheimer's & dementia: the journal of the Alzheimer's Association 12/2012; · 14.48 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
379.12 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2014
    • University of California, Berkeley
      Berkeley, California, United States
  • 2006–2014
    • University of California, San Francisco
      • Department of Neurology
      San Francisco, California, United States
  • 2013
    • University College London
      • Centre for Obesity Research
      London, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 2011
    • HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research
      Bloomington, Minnesota, United States