Gil D Rabinovici

University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States

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Publications (108)1009.62 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Group comparisons demonstrate greater visuospatial and memory deficits and temporoparietal-predominant degeneration on neuroimaging in patients with corticobasal syndrome (CBS) found to have Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology versus those with underlying frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). The value of these features in predicting underlying AD pathology in individual patients is unknown. The goal of this study is to evaluate the utility of modified clinical criteria and visual interpretations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for predicting amyloid deposition (as a surrogate of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology) in patients presenting with CBS. In total, 25 patients meeting CBS core criteria underwent amyloid (Pittsburgh compound B; PIB) PET scans. Clinical records, MRI, and FDG scans were reviewed blinded to PIB results. Modified clinical criteria were used to classify CBS patients as temporoparietal variant CBS (tpvCBS) or frontal variant CBS (fvCBS). MRI and FDG-PET were classified based on the predominant atrophy/hypometabolism pattern (frontal or temporoparietal). A total of 9 out of 13 patients classified as tpvCBS were PIB+, compared to 2out of 12 patients classified as fvCBS (P < 0.01, sensitivity 82%, specificity 71% for PIB+ status). Visual MRI reads had 73% sensitivity and 46% specificity for PIB+ status with moderate intra-rater reliability (Cohen's kappa = 0.42). Visual FDG reads had higher sensitivity (91%) for PIB+ status with perfect intra-rater reliability (kappa = 1.00), though specificity was low (50%). PIB results were confirmed in all 8 patients with available histopathology (3 PIB+ with confirmed AD, 5 PIB- with FTLD). Splitting CBS patients into frontal or temporoparietal clinical variants can help predict the likelihood of underlying AD, but criteria require further refinement. Temporoparietal-predominant neuroimaging patterns are sensitive but not specific for AD.
    Alzheimer's Research and Therapy 12/2015; 7(1):8. DOI:10.1186/s13195-014-0093-y · 3.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although TDP-43 is the main constituent of the ubiquitinated cytoplasmic inclusions in the most common forms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration, TARDBP mutations are not a common cause of familial frontotemporal dementia, especially in the absence of motor neuron disease. We describe a pedigree presenting with a complex autosomal dominant disease, with a heterogeneous clinical phenotype, comprising unspecified dementia, parkinsonism, frontotemporal dementia and motor neuron disease. Genetic analyses identified a novel P112H TARDBP double variation located in exon 3 coding for the first RNA recognition motif of the protein (RRM1). This double mutation is probably pathogenic based on neuropathological findings, in silico prediction analysis and exome sequencing. The two autopsied siblings described here presented with frontotemporal dementia involving multiple cognitive domains and behavior but lacking symptoms of motor neuron disease throughout the disease course. The siblings presented with strikingly similar, although atypical, neuropathological features, including an unclassifiable TDP-43 inclusion pattern, a high burden of tau-negative β-amyloid neuritic plaques with an AD-like biochemical profile, and an unclassifiable 4-repeat tauopathy. The co-occurrence of multiple protein inclusions points to a pathogenic mechanism that facilitates misfolded protein interaction and aggregation or a loss of TDP-43 function that somehow impairs protein clearance. TARDBP mutation screening should be considered in familial frontotemporal dementia cases, even without signs or symptoms of motor neuron disease, especially when other more frequent causes of genetic frontotemporal dementia (i.e. GRN, C9ORF72, MAPT) have been excluded and when family history is complex and includes parkinsonism, motor neuron disease and frontotemporal dementia. Further investigations in this family may provide insight into the physiological functions of TARDBP.
    12/2015; 3(1):19. DOI:10.1186/s40478-015-0190-6
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    ABSTRACT: We report a diagnostically challenging case of a 64-year-old man with a history of remote head trauma who developed mild behavioral changes and dyscalculia. He was diagnosed with clinical Alzheimer's disease (AD), with additional features consistent with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. Structural magnetic resonance imaging revealed atrophy in bilateral frontal and parietal cortices and hippocampi on visual inspection and left frontal pole and bilateral anterior temporal encephalomalacia, suspected to be due to head trauma. Consistent with the diagnosis of Alzheimer's pathology, positron emission tomography (PET) with Pittsburgh compound B suggested the presence of beta-amyloid. Fluorodeoxyglucose PET demonstrated hypometabolism in bilateral frontal and temporoparietal cortices. Voxel-based morphometry showed atrophy predominant in ventral frontal regions (bilateral orbitofrontal cortex, pregenual anterior cingulate/medial superior frontal gyrus), bilateral mid cingulate, bilateral lateral temporal cortex, and posterior insula. Bilateral caudate, thalamus, hippocampi, and cerebellum were prominently atrophied. Unexpectedly, a pathologic hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9ORF72 was identified in this patient. This report underscores the clinical variability in C9ORF72 expansion carriers and the need to consider mixed pathologies, particularly when imaging studies are inconsistent with a single syndrome or pathology.
    Neurocase 08/2015; DOI:10.1080/13554794.2015.1080283 · 1.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A 'frontal variant of Alzheimer's disease' has been described in patients with predominant behavioural or dysexecutive deficits caused by Alzheimer's disease pathology. The description of this rare Alzheimer's disease phenotype has been limited to case reports and small series, and many clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathological characteristics are not well understood. In this retrospective study, we included 55 patients with Alzheimer's disease with a behavioural-predominant presentation (behavioural Alzheimer's disease) and a neuropathological diagnosis of high-likelihood Alzheimer's disease (n = 17) and/or biomarker evidence of Alzheimer's disease pathology (n = 44). In addition, we included 29 patients with autopsy/biomarker-defined Alzheimer's disease with a dysexecutive-predominant syndrome (dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease). We performed structured chart reviews to ascertain clinical features. First symptoms were more often cognitive (behavioural Alzheimer's disease: 53%; dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease: 83%) than behavioural (behavioural Alzheimer's disease: 25%; dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease: 3%). Apathy was the most common behavioural feature, while hyperorality and perseverative/compulsive behaviours were less prevalent. Fifty-two per cent of patients with behavioural Alzheimer's disease met diagnostic criteria for possible behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia. Overlap between behavioural and dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease was modest (9/75 patients). Sixty per cent of patients with behavioural Alzheimer's disease and 40% of those with the dysexecutive syndrome carried at least one APOE ε4 allele. We also compared neuropsychological test performance and brain atrophy (applying voxel-based morphometry) with matched autopsy/biomarker-defined typical (amnestic-predominant) Alzheimer's disease (typical Alzheimer's disease, n = 58), autopsy-confirmed/Alzheimer's disease biomarker-negative behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 59), and controls (n = 61). Patients with behavioural Alzheimer's disease showed worse memory scores than behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and did not differ from typical Alzheimer's disease, while executive function composite scores were lower compared to behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and typical Alzheimer's disease. Voxel-wise contrasts between behavioural and dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease patients and controls revealed marked atrophy in bilateral temporoparietal regions and only limited atrophy in the frontal cortex. In direct comparison with behavioural and those with dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease, patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia showed more frontal atrophy and less posterior involvement, whereas patients with typical Alzheimer's disease were slightly more affected posteriorly and showed less frontal atrophy (P < 0.001 uncorrected). Among 24 autopsied behavioural Alzheimer's disease/dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease patients, only two had primary co-morbid FTD-spectrum pathology (progressive supranuclear palsy). In conclusion, behavioural Alzheimer's disease presentations are characterized by a milder and more restricted behavioural profile than in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, co-occurrence of memory dysfunction and high APOE ε4 prevalence. Dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease presented as a primarily cognitive phenotype with minimal behavioural abnormalities and intermediate APOE ε4 prevalence. Both behavioural Alzheimer's disease and dysexecutive Alzheimer's disease presentations are distinguished by temporoparietal-predominant atrophy. Based on the relative sparing of frontal grey matter, we propose to redefine these clinical syndromes as 'the behavioural/dysexecutive variant of Alzheimer's disease' rather than frontal variant Alzheimer's disease. Further work is needed to determine whether behavioural and dysexecutive-predominant presentations of Alzheimer's disease represent distinct phenotypes or a single continuum. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Brain 07/2015; DOI:10.1093/brain/awv191 · 10.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) can show superimposed amyloid pathology, though the impact of amyloid on the clinical presentation of FTLD is not well characterized. This cross-sectional case-control study compared clinical features, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography metabolism and gray matter volume loss in 30 patients with familial FTLD in whom amyloid status was confirmed with autopsy or Pittsburgh compound B-PET. Compared to the amyloid-negative patients, the amyloid-positive patients performed significantly worse on several cognitive tests and showed hypometabolism and volume loss in more temporoparietal regions. Our results suggest that in FTLD amyloid positivity is associated with a more Alzheimer's disease-like pattern of neurodegeneration.
    Neurocase 06/2015; DOI:10.1080/13554794.2015.1046458 · 1.38 Impact Factor
  • Gil D Rabinovici · Melanie L Stephens · Katherine L Possin
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    ABSTRACT: Executive functions represent a constellation of cognitive abilities that drive goal-oriented behavior and are critical to the ability to adapt to an ever-changing world. This article provides a clinically oriented approach to classifying, localizing, diagnosing, and treating disorders of executive function, which are pervasive in clinical practice. Executive functions can be split into four distinct components: working memory, inhibition, set shifting, and fluency. These components may be differentially affected in individual patients and act together to guide higher-order cognitive constructs such as planning and organization. Specific bedside and neuropsychological tests can be applied to evaluate components of executive function. While dysexecutive syndromes were first described in patients with frontal lesions, intact executive functioning relies on distributed neural networks that include not only the prefrontal cortex, but also the parietal cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. Executive dysfunction arises from injury to any of these regions, their white matter connections, or neurotransmitter systems. Dysexecutive symptoms therefore occur in most neurodegenerative diseases and in many other neurologic, psychiatric, and systemic illnesses. Management approaches are patient specific and should focus on treatment of the underlying cause in parallel with maximizing patient function and safety via occupational therapy and rehabilitation. Executive dysfunction is extremely common in patients with neurologic disorders. Diagnosis and treatment hinge on familiarity with the clinical components and neuroanatomic correlates of these complex, high-order cognitive processes.
    06/2015; 21(3 Behavioral Neurology and Neuropsychiatry):646-59. DOI:10.1212/01.CON.0000466658.05156.54
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    ABSTRACT: Cerebral amyloid-β aggregation is an early pathological event in Alzheimer disease (AD), starting decades before dementia onset. Estimates of the prevalence of amyloid pathology in persons without dementia are needed to understand the development of AD and to design prevention studies. To use individual participant data meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of amyloid pathology as measured with biomarkers in participants with normal cognition, subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Relevant biomarker studies identified by searching studies published before April 2015 using the MEDLINE and Web of Science databases and through personal communication with investigators. Studies were included if they provided individual participant data for participants without dementia and used an a priori defined cutoff for amyloid positivity. Individual records were provided for 2914 participants with normal cognition, 697 with SCI, and 3972 with MCI aged 18 to 100 years from 55 studies. Prevalence of amyloid pathology on positron emission tomography or in cerebrospinal fluid according to AD risk factors (age, apolipoprotein E [APOE] genotype, sex, and education) estimated by generalized estimating equations. The prevalence of amyloid pathology increased from age 50 to 90 years from 10% (95% CI, 8%-13%) to 44% (95% CI, 37%-51%) among participants with normal cognition; from 12% (95% CI, 8%-18%) to 43% (95% CI, 32%-55%) among patients with SCI; and from 27% (95% CI, 23%-32%) to 71% (95% CI, 66%-76%) among patients with MCI. APOE-ε4 carriers had 2 to 3 times higher prevalence estimates than noncarriers. The age at which 15% of the participants with normal cognition were amyloid positive was approximately 40 years for APOE ε4ε4 carriers, 50 years for ε2ε4 carriers, 55 years for ε3ε4 carriers, 65 years for ε3ε3 carriers, and 95 years for ε2ε3 carriers. Amyloid positivity was more common in highly educated participants but not associated with sex or biomarker modality. Among persons without dementia, the prevalence of cerebral amyloid pathology as determined by positron emission tomography or cerebrospinal fluid findings was associated with age, APOE genotype, and presence of cognitive impairment. These findings suggest a 20- to 30-year interval between first development of amyloid positivity and onset of dementia.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 05/2015; 313(9):1924-1938. DOI:10.1001/jama.2015.4668 · 30.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: the Amyloid PET Study Group IMPORTANCE Amyloid-β positron emission tomography (PET) imaging allows in vivo detection of fibrillar plaques, a core neuropathological feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Its diagnostic utility is still unclear because amyloid plaques also occur in patients with non–AD dementia. OBJECTIVE To use individual participant data meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of amyloid positivity on PET in a wide variety of dementia syndromes. DATA SOURCES The MEDLINE and Web of Science databases were searched from January 2004 to April 2015 for amyloid PET studies. STUDY SELECTION Case reports and studies on neurological or psychiatric diseases other than dementia were excluded. Corresponding authors of eligible cohorts were invited to provide individual participant data. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS Data were provided for 1359 participants with clinically diagnosed AD and 538 participants with non–AD dementia. The reference groups were 1849 healthy control participants (based on amyloid PET) and an independent sample of 1369 AD participants (based on autopsy). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Estimated prevalence of positive amyloid PET scans according to diagnosis, age, and apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 status, using the generalized estimating equations method. RESULTS The likelihood of amyloid positivity was associated with age and APOE ε4 status. In AD dementia, the prevalence of amyloid positivity decreased from age 50 to 90 years in APOE ε4 noncarriers (86% [95% CI, 73%-94%] at 50 years to 68% [95% CI, 57%-77%] at 90 years; n = 377) and to a lesser degree in APOE ε4 carriers (97% [95% CI, 92%-99%] at 50 years to 90% [95% CI, 83%-94%] at 90 years; n = 593; P < .01). Similar associations of age and APOE ε4 with amyloid positivity were observed in participants with AD dementia at autopsy. In most non–AD dementias, amyloid positivity increased with both age (from 60 to 80 years) and APOE ε4 carriership.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 05/2015; 313(19). DOI:10.1001/jama.2015.4669 · 30.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prior studies report that cavum septum pellucidum (CSP) is frequent among athletes with a history of repeated traumatic brain injury (TBI), such as boxers. Few studies of CSP in athletes, however, have assessed detailed features of the septum pellucidum in a case-control fashion. This is important because prevalence of CSP in the general population varies widely (2% to 85%) between studies. Furthermore, rates of CSP among American pro-football players have not been previously described. We sought to characterize MRI features of the septum pellucidum in a series of retired pro-football players with a history of repeated concussive/sub-concussive head traumas compared to controls. We retrospectively assessed retired American pro-football players presenting to our memory clinic with cognitive/behavioral symptoms in whom structural MRI was available with slice thickness ≤2mm (n= 17). Each player was matched to a memory clinic control patient with no history of TBI. Scans were interpreted by raters blinded to clinical information and TBI/football history, who measured CSP grade (0-absent, 1-equivocal, 2-mild, 3-moderate, 4-severe) and length according to a standard protocol. 16/17 players (94%) had a CSP graded ≥2 compared to 3/17 controls (18%). CSP was significantly higher grade (p<0.001) and longer in players than controls (mean length ±SD: 10.6mm ±5.4 vs. 1.1mm ±1.3, p<0.001). Among patients presenting to a memory clinic, long high-grade CSP was more frequent in retired pro-football players compared to patients without a history of TBI.
    Journal of neurotrauma 05/2015; DOI:10.1089/neu.2014.3805 · 3.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Amyloid-β, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, begins accumulating up to two decades before the onset of dementia, and can be detected in vivo applying amyloid-β positron emission tomography tracers such as carbon-11-labelled Pittsburgh compound-B. A variety of thresholds have been applied in the literature to define Pittsburgh compound-B positron emission tomography positivity, but the ability of these thresholds to detect early amyloid-β deposition is unknown, and validation studies comparing Pittsburgh compound-B thresholds to post-mortem amyloid burden are lacking. In this study we first derived thresholds for amyloid positron emission tomography positivity using Pittsburgh compound-B positron emission tomography in 154 cognitively normal older adults with four complementary approaches: (i) reference values from a young control group aged between 20 and 30 years; (ii) a Gaussian mixture model that assigned each subject a probability of being amyloid-β-positive or amyloid-β-negative based on Pittsburgh compound-B index uptake; (iii) a k-means cluster approach that clustered subjects into amyloid-β-positive or amyloid-β-negative based on Pittsburgh compound-B uptake in different brain regions (features); and (iv) an iterative voxel-based analysis that further explored the spatial pattern of early amyloid-β positron emission tomography signal. Next, we tested the sensitivity and specificity of the derived thresholds in 50 individuals who underwent Pittsburgh compound-B positron emission tomography during life and brain autopsy (mean time positron emission tomography to autopsy 3.1 ± 1.8 years). Amyloid at autopsy was classified using Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) criteria, unadjusted for age. The analytic approaches yielded low thresholds (standard uptake value ratiolow = 1.21, distribution volume ratiolow = 1.08) that represent the earliest detectable Pittsburgh compound-B signal, as well as high thresholds (standard uptake value ratiohigh = 1.40, distribution volume ratiohigh = 1.20) that are more conservative in defining Pittsburgh compound-B positron emission tomography positivity. In voxel-wise contrasts, elevated Pittsburgh compound-B retention was first noted in the medial frontal cortex, then the precuneus, lateral frontal and parietal lobes, and finally the lateral temporal lobe. When compared to post-mortem amyloid burden, low proposed thresholds were more sensitive than high thresholds (sensitivities: distribution volume ratiolow 81.0%, standard uptake value ratiolow 83.3%; distribution volume ratiohigh 61.9%, standard uptake value ratiohigh 62.5%) for CERAD moderate-to-frequent neuritic plaques, with similar specificity (distribution volume ratiolow 95.8%; standard uptake value ratiolow, distribution volume ratiohigh and standard uptake value ratiohigh 100.0%). A receiver operator characteristic analysis identified optimal distribution volume ratio (1.06) and standard uptake value ratio (1.20) thresholds that were nearly identical to the a priori distribution volume ratiolow and standard uptake value ratiolow. In summary, we found that frequently applied thresholds for Pittsburgh compound-B positivity (typically at or above distribution volume ratiohigh and standard uptake value ratiohigh) are overly stringent in defining amyloid positivity. Lower thresholds in this study resulted in higher sensitivity while not compromising specificity. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Brain 05/2015; DOI:10.1093/brain/awv112 · 10.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Different clinical variants of probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) share underlying plaques and tangles but show distinct atrophy patterns. We included 52 posterior cortical atrophy, 29 logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia, 53 early-onset and 42 late-onset AD patients, selected for abnormal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-amyloid-beta42, with CSF and magnetic resonance imaging data available. Bootstrapping revealed no differences in the prevalence of abnormal CSF total-tau and phosphorylated-tau between probable AD variants (range total-tau: 84.9%-92.3%, phosphorylated-tau: 79.2%-93.1%, p > 0.05). Voxelwise linear regressions showed various relationships between lower CSF-Aβ42 and syndrome-specific atrophy, involving precuneus, posterior cingulate, and medial temporal lobe in early-onset AD, occipital cortex and middle temporal gyrus in posterior cortical atrophy; anterior cingulate, insular cortex and precentral gyrus (left > right) in logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia; and medial temporal lobe, thalamus, and temporal pole in late-onset AD (all at p < 0.001 uncorrected). In contrast, CSF-tau was not related to gray matter atrophy in any group. Our findings suggest that lower CSF-amyloid-beta42 - and not increased total-tau and phosphorylated-tau - relates to reduced gray matter volumes, mostly in regions that are typically atrophied in distinct clinical variants of probable AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Neurobiology of Aging 04/2015; 36(8). DOI:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2015.04.011 · 4.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Although TDP-43 is the main constituent of the ubiquitinated cytoplasmic inclusions in the most common forms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration, TARDBP mutations are not a common cause of familial frontotemporal dementia, especially in the absence of motor neuron disease. RESULTS: We describe a pedigree presenting with a complex autosomal dominant disease, with a heterogeneous clinical phenotype, comprising unspecified dementia, parkinsonism, frontotemporal dementia and motor neuron disease. Genetic analyses identified a novel P112H TARDBP double variation located in exon 3 coding for the first RNA recognition motif of the protein (RRM1). This double mutation is probably pathogenic based on neuropathological findings, in silico prediction analysis and exome sequencing. The two autopsied siblings described here presented with frontotemporal dementia involving multiple cognitive domains and behavior but lacking symptoms of motor neuron disease throughout the disease course. The siblings presented with strikingly similar, although atypical, neuropathological features, including an unclassifiable TDP-43 inclusion pattern, a high burden of tau-negative β-amyloid neuritic plaques with an AD-like biochemical profile, and an unclassifiable 4-repeat tauopathy. The co-occurrence of multiple protein inclusions points to a pathogenic mechanism that facilitates misfolded protein interaction and aggregation or a loss of TDP-43 function that somehow impairs protein clearance. CONCLUSIONS: TARDBP mutation screening should be considered in familial frontotemporal dementia cases, even without signs or symptoms of motor neuron disease, especially when other more frequent causes of genetic frontotemporal dementia (i.e. GRN, C9ORF72, MAPT) have been excluded and when family history is complex and includes parkinsonism, motor neuron disease and frontotemporal dementia. Further investigations in this family may provide insight into the physiological functions of TARDBP.
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    ABSTRACT: The term early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) identifies patients who meet criteria for AD, but show onset of symptoms before the age of 65. We map progression of gray matter atrophy in EOAD patients compared to late-onset AD (LOAD). T1-weighted MRI scans were obtained at diagnosis and one-year follow-up from 15 EOAD, 10 LOAD, and 38 age-matched controls. Voxel-based and tensor-based morphometry were used, respectively, to assess the baseline and progression of atrophy. At baseline, EOAD patients already showed a widespread atrophy in temporal, parietal, occipital, and frontal cortices. After one year, EOAD had atrophy progression in medial temporal and medial parietal cortices. At baseline, LOAD patients showed atrophy in the medial temporal regions only, and, after one year, an extensive pattern of atrophy progression in the same neocortical cortices of EOAD. Although atrophy mainly involved different lateral neocortical or medial temporal hubs at baseline, it eventually progressed along the same brain default-network regions in both groups. The cortical region showing a significant progression in both groups was the medial precuneus/posterior cingulate.
    Journal of Alzheimer's disease: JAD 03/2015; DOI:10.3233/JAD-142292 · 4.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Measures of neocortical amyloid burden (NAB) identify individuals who are at substantially greater risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Blood-based biomarkers predicting NAB would have great utility for the enrichment of AD clinical trials, including large-scale prevention trials.
    03/2015; 1(1):48-60. DOI:10.1016/j.dadm.2014.11.005
  • American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 03/2015; 23(3):S150-S151. DOI:10.1016/j.jagp.2014.12.156 · 3.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Determining the relative contribution of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles to brain dysfunction in Alzheimer disease is critical for therapeutic approaches, but until recently could only be assessed at autopsy. We report a patient with posterior cortical atrophy (visual variant of Alzheimer disease) who was studied using the novel tau tracer [(18) F]AV-1451 in conjunction with [(11) C]Pittsburgh compound B (PIB; amyloid) and [(18) F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography. Whereas [(11) C]PIB bound throughout association neocortex, [(18) F]AV-1451 was selectively retained in posterior brain regions that were affected clinically and showed markedly reduced [(18) F]FDG uptake. This provides preliminary in vivo evidence that tau is more closely linked to hypometabolism and symptomatology than amyloid. Ann Neurol 2014. © 2014 American Neurological Association.
    Annals of Neurology 02/2015; 77(2). DOI:10.1002/ana.24321 · 11.91 Impact Factor
  • Gil D Rabinovici
    JAMA Neurology 01/2015; DOI:10.1001/jamaneurol.2014.4143 · 7.01 Impact Factor
  • Neurology 12/2014; 84(2). DOI:10.1212/WNL.0000000000001131 · 8.30 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
1,009.62 Total Impact Points

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Institutions

  • 2008–2015
    • University of California, San Francisco
      • • Department of Neurology
      • • Memory and Aging Center
      San Francisco, California, United States
    • University of California, Berkeley
      Berkeley, California, United States
  • 2012
    • CSU Mentor
      Long Beach, California, United States