Lori G Weiser

Bronx-Lebanon Hospital, Bronxville, New York, United States

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Publications (2)3.1 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background We investigated the reconstitution of the glenoid bone after degradation of absorbable knotless suture anchors used for labral repair. Methods Arthroscopic labral repairs performed on 59 shoulders in 55 patients by a single surgeon using knotless poly-L-lactic acid suture anchors were reviewed at a mean of 46.5 months. Computed tomographic scans of the operated shoulder were reviewed by two independent radiologists for the number of drill holes present, as well as the amount of bony reconstitution and the presence of osteoarthritis. Results One hundred and ninety anchors were placed and both radiologists counted 185 drill holes (97%). Agreement between the radiologists was high (kappa = 0.96). The majority of holes had partial bony ingrowth (69% to 71%) and osteolysis was infrequent (6%). The prevalence of degenerative joint disease was 7% to 8%. Conclusions Biodegradable suture anchors are a viable option for labral fixation during arthroscopic shoulder stabilization but, in most cases, the drillholes are not fully replaced with bone and may enlarge, although the effect on clinical outcome is uncertain.
    Shoulder & Elbow 01/2013; 5(1):44-47.
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    ABSTRACT: Absorbable suture anchors are widely used in arthroscopic shoulder reconstruction procedures and provide a good solution for stabilization in athletes. In our practice we identified a group of 3 patients who had participated in contact sports and in whom traumatic instability developed. Subluxation of the shoulder followed repair by use of absorbable suture anchors. Each patient had a new injury characterized by a glenoid rim fracture that was not amenable to further arthroscopic reconstruction and was revised by use of a modified Latarjet procedure. All patients successfully returned to contact sports. We conclude that resorption defects resulting from the use of absorbable anchors contribute to an increased risk of rim fracture.
    Arthroscopy The Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery 06/2009; 25(5):560-2. · 3.10 Impact Factor