P Scheinmann

Université René Descartes - Paris 5, Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (402)885.85 Total impact

  • Journal of cystic fibrosis: official journal of the European Cystic Fibrosis Society 01/2014; · 3.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Beta-lactam hypersensitivity (HS) is suspected in 5-12% of the children, but proven in only 10-15% of those children, based on skin and challenge tests results. In contrast, 30-60% of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are diagnosed allergic to beta-lactams, based mainly on the clinical history of the patients. To confirm or rule out a suspected beta-lactam HS in CF children and to determine the prevalences of suspected and confirmed beta-lactam HS in those children. Children with CF and suspected beta-lactam HS were explored by means of skin and challenge tests with the suspected and alternate beta-lactams. The results in CF children were compared with those reported in the literature in non- CF children. Eight of the 701 CF children followed in our center between 1990 and 2011 (1.14%), and 11 other children from other centers were explored for suspected beta-lactam HS. Beta-lactam HS was diagnosed in nine of these children (47.3%). Based on the results in the children followed in our center, the prevalence of beta-lactam HS was 0.71% (5/701) in CF children vs. a mean estimated prevalence of 1-1.5% in the general pediatric population. Our results contrast with those of most previous studies. Although half of the CF children with suspected beta-lactam HS were truly allergic to beta-lactams, the general prevalence of beta-lactam HS in CF children was very low. This may result from tolerance induced by frequent and/or prolonged treatments with beta-lactams.
    Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 11/2013; · 3.38 Impact Factor
  • G. Lezmi, C. Karila, J. de Blic, P. Scheinmann
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    ABSTRACT: Allergic rhinitis is a common chronic disease in children and adults, responsible for important changes in their quality of life. The results of several recent cohort studies have provided a better description of its risk factors and its association with asthma. Allergic rhinitis often begins during childhood and persists into adulthood; it is more frequent in females. Exposure to tobacco smoke during pregnancy and early childhood, a parental history of allergy, and sensitization may be risk factors for the development of allergic rhinitis. The presence of allergic rhinitis in non-asthmatic individuals may predict the subsequent development of asthma, while its presence in asthmatics predicts persistence of their asthma. Allergic rhinitis and asthma might be two distinct diseases, but they seem more likely to represent two different expressions of a unique airway disease.
    Revue Française d'Allergologie 04/2013; 53(3):270–274. · 0.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: According to the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) classification, mild asthma includes intermittent and mild persistent asthma. It represents more than 75% of asthmatic children. The symptoms and functional impact are well described. Mild asthma can lead to severe exacerbations. Progression to more severe disease may occur. Consequently, it is important to diagnose mild asthma, to initiate the appropriate treatment early, and to identify the risk factors for aggravation. Nevertheless, mild asthma is under-diagnosed and under-treated. Bronchial inflammation and remodeling are observed in mild asthma. A daily low-dose of inhaled corticosteroids is the reference treatment for mild persistent asthma. Intermittent inhaled corticosteroids cannot be recommended in children with mild persistent asthma.
    Revue des Maladies Respiratoires 02/2013; 30(2):115-24. · 0.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: According to the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) classification, mild asthma includes intermittent and mild persistent asthma. It represents more than 75% of asthmatic children. The symptoms and functional impact are well described. Mild asthma can lead to severe exacerbations. Progression to more severe disease may occur. Consequently, it is important to diagnose mild asthma, to initiate the appropriate treatment early, and to identify the risk factors for aggravation. Nevertheless, mild asthma is under-diagnosed and under-treated. Bronchial inflammation and remodeling are observed in mild asthma. A daily low-dose of inhaled corticosteroids is the reference treatment for mild persistent asthma. Intermittent inhaled corticosteroids cannot be recommended in children with mild persistent asthma.
    Revue des Maladies Respiratoires. 02/2013; 30(2):115–124.
  • P. Scheinmann, N. Pham Thi, C. Karila, J. de Blic
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    ABSTRACT: Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a common IgE dependent disorder. AR is maybe one of the steps of the allergic march, which starts with atopic dermatitis and food allergy and includes atopic asthma. AR and asthma are frequently associated. AR is frequently under-diagnosed and undertreated although it affects quality of life and school performance. Management of AR depends on its severity and will associate environmental control (best guided by environmental investigation and skin testing of specific IgE antibodies), pharmacotherapy (with antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroids as first line drugs). At present allergen immunotherapy is considered in patients with severe AR, insufficiently controlled by pharmacotherapy and who demonstrate specific IgE antibodies to relevant allergens. Sublingual immunotherapy is well tolerated. Only immunotherapy with the right allergens has the potential to alter the natural history of the allergic march, by preventing the development of new allergen sensitizations and reducing the risk for the subsequent development of asthma. This fact might extend the indications of specific allergen immunotherapy. Patients (and parents) education is of utmost importance in the management of allergic disorders.
    Archives de Pédiatrie. 03/2012; 19(3):330–334.
  • P Scheinmann, N Pham Thi, C Karila, J de Blic
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    ABSTRACT: Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a common IgE dependent disorder. AR is maybe one of the steps of the allergic march, which starts with atopic dermatitis and food allergy and includes atopic asthma. AR and asthma are frequently associated. AR is frequently under-diagnosed and undertreated although it affects quality of life and school performance. Management of AR depends on its severity and will associate environmental control (best guided by environmental investigation and skin testing of specific IgE antibodies), pharmacotherapy (with antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroids as first line drugs). At present allergen immunotherapy is considered in patients with severe AR, insufficiently controlled by pharmacotherapy and who demonstrate specific IgE antibodies to relevant allergens. Sublingual immunotherapy is well tolerated. Only immunotherapy with the right allergens has the potential to alter the natural history of the allergic march, by preventing the development of new allergen sensitizations and reducing the risk for the subsequent development of asthma. This fact might extend the indications of specific allergen immunotherapy. Patients (and parents) education is of utmost importance in the management of allergic disorders.
    Archives de Pédiatrie 03/2012; 19(3):330-4. · 0.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aims were to assess 1) the relationship of asthma control assessed by combining epidemiological survey questions and lung function to Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQL) and 2) whether individuals with controlled asthma reach similar generic HRQL levels as individuals without asthma. The analysis included 584 individuals without asthma and 498 with asthma who participated in the follow-up of the Epidemiological study on Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA). Asthma control was assessed from survey questions and lung function, closely adapted from the 2006-2009 Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines. The Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ, scores range:1-7) and the generic SF-36 (scores range: 0-100) were used. Adjusted mean total AQLQ score decreased by 0.5 points for each asthma control steps (6.4, 5.9 and 5.4 for controlled, partly-controlled and uncontrolled asthma respectively, p < 0.0001). The differences in SF-36 scores between individuals with controlled asthma and those without asthma were minor and not significant for the PCS (-1, p = 0.09), borderline significant for the MCS (-1.6, p = 0.05) and small for the 8 domains (<5.1) although statistically significant for 4 domains. These results support the discriminative properties of the proposed asthma control grading system and its use in epidemiology.
    Respiratory medicine 02/2012; 106(6):820-8. · 2.33 Impact Factor
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    Clinical and Translational Allergy. 08/2011; 1(1).
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    ABSTRACT: Studies based on skin and challenge tests have shown that 12-60% of children with suspected betalactam hypersensitivity were allergic to betalactams. Responses in skin and challenge tests were studied in 1865 children with suspected betalactam allergy (i) to confirm or rule out the suspected diagnosis; (ii) to evaluate diagnostic value of immediate and non-immediate responses in skin and challenge tests; (iii) to determine frequency of betalactam allergy in those children, and (iv) to determine potential risk factors for betalactam allergy. The work-up was completed in 1431 children, of whom 227 (15.9%) were diagnosed allergic to betalactams. Betalactam hypersensitivity was diagnosed in 50 of the 162 (30.9%) children reporting immediate reactions and in 177 of the 1087 (16.7%) children reporting non-immediate reactions (p<0.001). The likelihood of betalactam hypersensitivity was also significantly higher in children reporting anaphylaxis, serum sickness-like reactions, and (potentially) severe skin reactions such as acute generalized exanthematic pustulosis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and drug reaction with systemic symptoms than in other children (p<0.001). Skin tests diagnosed 86% of immediate and 31.6% of non-immediate sensitizations. Cross-reactivity and/or cosensitization among betalactams was diagnosed in 76% and 14.7% of the children with immediate and non-immediate hypersensitivity, respectively. The number of children diagnosed allergic to betalactams decreased with time between the reaction and the work-up, probably because the majority of children with severe and worrying reactions were referred for allergological work-up more promptly than the other children. Sex, age, and atopy were not risk factors for betalactam hypersensitivity. In conclusion, we confirm in numerous children that (i) only a few children with suspected betalactam hypersensitivity are allergic to betalactams; (ii) the likelihood of betalactam allergy increases with earliness and/or severity of the reactions; (iii) although non-immediate-reading skin tests (intradermal and patch tests) may diagnose non-immediate sensitizations in children with non-immediate reactions to betalactams (maculopapular rashes and potentially severe skin reactions especially), the diagnostic value of non-immediate-reading skin tests is far lower than the diagnostic value of immediate-reading skin tests, most non-immediate sensitizations to betalactams being diagnosed by means of challenge tests; (iv) cross-reactivity and/or cosensitizations among betalactams are much more frequent in children reporting immediate and/or anaphylactic reactions than in the other children; (v) age, sex and personal atopy are not significant risk factors for betalactam hypersensitivity; and (vi) the number of children with diagnosed allergy to betalactams (of the immediate-type hypersensitivity especially) decreases with time between the reaction and allergological work-up. Finally, based on our experience, we also propose a practical diagnostic approach in children with suspected betalactam hypersensitivity.
    Pediatric Allergy and Immunology 06/2011; 22(4):411-8. · 3.38 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - J ALLERG CLIN IMMUNOL. 01/2011; 127(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Atopic dermatitis is frequently the first step of the atopic march. Frequency and severity of subsequent asthma are higher in children with severe cutaneous lesions and with IgE-dependent multiple sensitisations. Filaggrin null mutations and food allergy are associated with increased severity of asthma. It remains to be demonstrated that treatment of atopic dermatitis will reduce the risk of subsequent allergic asthma and rhinitis.
    Revue Francaise D Allergologie - REV FR ALLERGOL. 01/2011; 51(3):323-328.
  • Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - J ALLERG CLIN IMMUNOL. 01/2011; 127(2).
  • C Ponvert, P Scheinmann, J de Blic
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    ABSTRACT: Anaphylaxis to pneumococcal vaccines is rare. In the only one child with anaphylaxis to a first injection of the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine that has been explored, skin tests and specific IgE determination diagnosed immediate-type hypersensitivity to pneumococcal antigens. We report the case of a child who tolerated three injections of the 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine, but experienced anaphylaxis to a fourth injection of the 23-valent vaccine. Immediate responses in skin tests diagnosed immediate-type hypersensitivity to the two vaccines. Immunizations with the 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine may induce IgE-dependent sensitization to pneumococcal antigens, responsible for anaphylaxis to subsequent injections of pneumococcal vaccines.
    Vaccine 10/2010; 28(52):8256-7. · 3.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at chromosome 17q21 confer an increased risk of early-onset asthma. The objective was to study whether 17q21 SNPs modify associations between early respiratory infections and asthma. Association analysis was conducted in 499 children (268 with asthma, median age 11 yrs) from the Epidemiological Study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA). The 12-yr follow-up data were used to assess persistent or remittent asthma in young adulthood. Respiratory infection before 2 yrs of age was assessed retrospectively. For the 12 17q21 SNPs studied, the odds ratios (OR) for association between infection and early-onset asthma (age at onset <or=4 yrs) were higher in carriers of risk genotypes (OR 3.42-6.36) than in noncarriers (OR 1.84-2.44; p-value for interaction 0.02-0.04 for five SNPs). Risk genotypes also increased the association between infection and childhood asthma that remits in adulthood (OR 4.84-7.16 in carriers and 1.74-2.25 in noncarriers; p-value for interaction 0.008-0.05 for 10 SNPs). In children with 17q21 risk genotypes and early-life environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure, associations between infection and asthma were further enhanced. 17q21 genetic variants and early ETS exposure enhance the association between early respiratory infections and early-onset asthma and childhood asthma that remits in adulthood.
    European Respiratory Journal 07/2010; 36(1):57-64. · 6.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: No data are available regarding the utility of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) level in guiding therapy in smoking asthmatic patients. Identification of the effect of smoking in a large sample is needed. To study the association between smoking and FeNO level according to current asthma and atopy status in adults from the French EGEA (Epidemiological study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and atopy). Levels of FeNO were measured at 50 mL/s in 654 adults (268 asthmatic participants). Active smoking and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure at home, at work, and during leisure activities were recorded. Participants were categorized as having no exposure to ETS, mild exposure (ETS <2 h/d), and noticeable exposure (ETS > or = 2 h/d). Multivariate analyses were performed, with adjustment for age, sex, height, and center. Mean adjusted FeNO values increased with asthma (15.1 vs 19.5 ppb), atopy (14.2 vs 18.9 ppb), and eosinophilia (15.8 vs 24.8 ppb) (P < .001 for all). Mean FeNO levels decreased with smoking (18.4, 17.5, and 14.5 ppb in nonsmokers, ex-smokers, and current smokers, respectively; P for trend = .001). The association with smoking was observed in nonasthmatic and asthmatic participants, especially in atopic asthmatic participants. Multivariate analyses showed that ETS exposure of at least 2 h/d and active smoking were negatively and significantly associated with FeNO levels independent of age, sex, height, and center in nonasthmatic participants (mean [SE], -0.13 [0.06], P = .03 and -0.10 [0.03], P < .001) and in asthmatic participants (mean [SE], -0.18 [0.07], P = .01 and -0.14 [0.04], P = .02). Active and passive smoking decreased FeNO levels in adults. Careful consideration of asthma, atopy, and active and passive smoking are needed to interpret FeNO values.
    Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology 05/2010; 104(5):385-93. · 3.45 Impact Factor
  • C. Ponvert, P. Scheinmann
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    ABSTRACT: Diagnosis of drug allergy is based on a careful anamnesis, skin tests, and challenge tests when skin tests are not validated or are negative in patients with a suggestive clinical history. Challenge tests should only be considered after balancing the risk/benefit ratio in the patients. Theoretically, challenge tests should be performed under supervision in the hospital, due to the risk of (severe) reaction induced by the test. However, based on the experience of several authors, challenge tests may be performed at home in the children reporting non immediate and non severe reactions to useful or essential drugs for the following reasons: the diagnostic value of non-immediate reading skin tests with drugs is low, as compared with the diagnostic value of immediate-reading skin tests, and most children with non-immediate hypersensitivity to drugs are diagnosed by means of challenge tests; most of the children reporting non-immediate and non severe reactions to drugs are not allergic to the suspected drugs, and tolerate challenge tests; the onset of non-immediate reactions is dependent on the dose and length of the treatment, and most reactions induced by challenge tests performed at home in children with non-immediate drug hypersensitivity are mild to moderately severe. Thus, for these reasons and for familial and economical reasons, challenges may and should be performed at home in children reporting non immediate and non (potentially) severe reactions to drugs.
    Revue Francaise D Allergologie - REV FR ALLERGOL. 01/2010; 50(3):179-183.
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    ABSTRACT: Although uncontrolled asthma remains frequent, determinants of asthma control are poorly studied. The aim was to estimate the distribution and the phenotypic characteristics of asthma control in 2 groups of subjects defined by the use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in the past 12 months, in the Epidemiological study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and atopy (EGEA). Five hundred one adult current patients with asthma who participated in the follow-up of the EGEA study were included. Asthma control was assessed from survey questions reflecting asthma control, as defined in the 2006 Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines. The factors analyzed were age, sex, educational level, body mass index, active and passive smoking, sensitization to aeroallergens, total IgE, rhinitis, chronic cough/phlegm, and age at asthma onset. Analyses were stratified according to ICS use. Uncontrolled asthma was more frequent in ICS users (27.6%, 35.0%, and 37.4% with controlled, partly-controlled, and uncontrolled asthma respectively) compared with non-ICS users (60.0%, 23.9%, and 16.1%, respectively). In ICS users, chronic cough or phlegm and female sex were independently and significantly related to uncontrolled asthma. In non-ICS users, high total IgE and sensitization to molds were associated with uncontrolled asthma. Smoking and rhinitis were not associated with asthma control. Optimal asthma control remained unachieved in the majority of patients with asthma in this study. Factors associated with uncontrolled asthma were different in ICS users (chronic cough/phlegm, female sex) and non-ICS users (high total IgE and sensitization to molds).
    The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology 09/2009; 124(4):681-7.e3. · 12.05 Impact Factor
  • Source
    A Rubio, C Ponvert, O Goulet, P Scheinmann, J de Blic
    Allergy 08/2009; 64(10):1555. · 5.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Proteins of the 2S albumin family, such as Ara h2 and Ara h6, are most frequently involved in peanut allergy. We have developed a reverse enzyme allergo-sorbent test (EAST) in which total serum IgE antibodies are first captured by immobilised anti-human IgE monoclonal antibodies, and then the binding of the anti-Ara h2 and anti-Ara h6 specific IgE to the corresponding labelled allergens is measured. This reverse immunoassay was used either as a direct EAST or as an EAST inhibition assay to study the interactions of whole peanut protein extract and purified Ara h2 and Ara h6 with IgE antibodies from peanut-allergic patients. Finally, we identified some IgE-binding epitopes on Ara h6 using a format of EAST in which the protein is immobilised in a particular, well defined, manner through interactions with specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) coated on the micro-plates. The fine specificity of those mAbs has been characterised at the epitope level, and their binding to the allergen thus masks a known particular epitope and makes it unavailable for recognition by IgE antibodies. The reverse EAST increased the ratio specific signal/background. It avoids interferences with competitors such as anti-peanut protein IgG antibodies and allows the study of the specificity and/or affinity of the interactions between IgE antibodies and Ara h2 or Ara h6 with a higher sensitivity and accuracy than the conventional EAST. The EAST results obtained when the allergens are presented by specific mAbs suggest that the homologous molecular domain(s) in peanut 2S albumins encompass major IgE epitope(s) and are strongly involved in peanut allergenicity.
    Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry 06/2009; 395(1):139-46. · 3.66 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
885.85 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2001–2013
    • Université René Descartes - Paris 5
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2009
    • University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis
      Nice, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
  • 2008
    • Institut Pasteur de Lille
      Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
  • 2006–2008
    • Federal University of Minas Gerais
      Cidade de Minas, Minas Gerais, Brazil
  • 2002–2008
    • Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 1987–2008
    • Centre de Pneumologie et d'Allergologie
      Avinyó, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
  • 2007
    • Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal Creteil
      Créteil, Île-de-France, France
  • 2005
    • Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission
      Fontenay, Île-de-France, France
  • 2004–2005
    • Hôpital d'Enfants de Tunis
      Tunis-Ville, Tūnis, Tunisia
  • 2003
    • Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Toulouse
      • Service de Pneumologie
      Toulouse, Midi-Pyrenees, France
  • 1999–2003
    • SickKids
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 1982–2001
    • Unité Inserm U1077
      Caen, Lower Normandy, France
  • 1990
    • Hôpital Ambroise Paré Paul Desbief
      Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France