Kian Ping Loh

Shenzhen University, Bao'an, Guangdong, China

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Publications (350)2023.47 Total impact

  • 11th National Congress of the Belgian Society for Neuroscience; 05/2015
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    ABSTRACT: As-grown transition metal dichalcogenides are usually chalcogen deficient, and therefore contain a high density of chalcogen vacancies, deep electron traps which can act as charged scattering centers, reducing the electron mobility. However, we show that chalcogen vacancies can be effectively passivated by oxygen, healing the electronic structure of the material. We proposed that this can be achieved by means of surface laser modification, and demonstrate the efficiency of this processing technique, which can enhance the conductivity of monolayer WSe2 by ~ 400 times, and its photoconductivity by ~ 150 times.
    Nano Letters 04/2015; 15(5). DOI:10.1021/acs.nanolett.5b00952 · 12.94 Impact Factor
  • Nano Research 04/2015; 8(4):1075-1080. DOI:10.1007/s12274-014-0585-x · 6.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Magnetic materials have found wide application ranging from electronics and memories to medicine. Essential to these advances is the control of the magnetic order. To date, most room-temperature applications have a fixed magnetic moment whose orientation is manipulated for functionality. Here we demonstrate an iron-oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposite based device that acts as a tunable ferromagnet at room temperature. Not only can we tune its transition temperature in a wide range of temperatures around room temperature, but the magnetization can also be tuned from zero to 0.011 A.m$^2$/kg through an initialization process with two readily accessible knobs (magnetic field and electric current), after which the system retains its magnetic properties semi-permanently until the next initialization process. We construct a theoretical model to illustrate that this tunability originates from an indirect exchange interaction mediated by spin-imbalanced electrons inside the nanocomposite.
  • Bo Peng, Priscilla Kailian Ang, Kian Ping Loh
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    ABSTRACT: Bo Peng received his B.Sc. degree in College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering from the Lanzhou University in 2005, and Ph.D. in Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences 2010. Currently, he is a postdoctoral research fellow with Prof. Kian Ping Loh at the Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore. His current research is on plasmonics, 2-D transition metal dichalcogenides, and perovskites with a focus on charge transfer dynamics at the interface toward light harvesting applications.
    Nano Today 02/2015; DOI:10.1016/j.nantod.2015.01.007 · 18.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nanoscale corrugations are of great importance in determining the physical properties of two-dimensional crystals. However, the mechanical behavior of atomically thin films under strain is not fully understood. In this Letter, we show a layer-dependent mechanical response of molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2) subject to atomistic-precision strain induced by 2H-bilayer island epitaxy. Dimensional crossover in the mechanical properties is evidenced by the formation of star-shaped nanoripple arrays in the first monolayer, while rippling instability is completely suppressed in the bilayer. Microscopic-level quantum mechanical simulations reveal that the nanoscale rippling is realized by the twisting of neighboring Mo—S bonds without modifying the chemical bond length, and thus invalidates the classical continuum mechanics. The formation of nanoripple arrays significantly changes the electronic and nanotribological properties of monolayer MoS 2. Our results suggest that quantum mechanical behavior is not unique for sp 2
    Physical Review Letters 02/2015; 1(6). DOI:10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.065501 · 7.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lithium alloys of group IV elements such as silicon and germanium are attractive candidates for use as anodes in high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries. However, the poor capacity retention arising from volume swing during lithium cycling restricts their widespread application. Herein, we report high reversible capacity and superior rate capability from core-shell structure consisting of germanium nanorods embedded in multiwall carbon nanotubes. To understand how the core-shell structure helps to mitigate volume swings and buffer against mechanical instability, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and in-situ 7Li nuclear magnetic resonance were used to probe the structural rearrangements and phase evolution of various Li-Ge alloy phases during (de)alloying reactions with lithium. The results provide insights into amorphous-to-crystalline transition and lithium germanide alloy phase transformation, which are important reactions controlling performance in this system.
    Journal of the American Chemical Society 02/2015; DOI:10.1021/ja5116259 · 11.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Multivalent transition metal oxides (MOx) containing redox centers which can theoretically accept more than one electron have been suggested as promising anode materials for high-performance lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The Li-storage mechanism of these oxides is suggested to involve an unusual conversion reaction leading to the formation of metallic nanograins and Li2O; however, a full-scale conversion reaction is seldom observed in molybdenum dioxide (MoO2) at room temperature due to slow kinetics. Herein, a full-scale multi-electron conversion reaction, leading to a high reversible capacity (974 mA h g−1 charging capacity at 60 mA g−1) in LIBs, is realized in a hybrid consisting of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheet-wrapped MoO2 porous nanobelts (rGO/MoO2 NBs). The rGO wrapping layers stabilize the nanophase transition in MoO2 and alleviate volume swing effects during lithiation/delithiation processes. This enables the hybrid to exhibit great cycle stability (tested to around 1900 cycles) and ultrafast rate capability (tested up to 50 A g−1).
    Small 01/2015; DOI:10.1002/smll.201403018 · 7.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present evidence of a drastic renormalization of the optical conductivity of graphene on SrTiO3 resulting in almost full transparency in the ultraviolet region. These findings are attributed to resonant excitonic effects further supported by ab-initio Bethe-Salpeter equation and density functional theory calculations. The (\pi,\pi*)-orbitals of graphene and Ti-3d t2g orbitals of SrTiO3 are strongly hybridized and the interactions of electron-hole states residing in those orbitals play dominant role in the graphene optical conductivity. These interactions are present much below the optical band gap of bulk SrTiO3. These results open a possibility of manipulating interaction strengths in graphene via \textit {d}-orbitals which could be crucial for optical applications.
    Physical Review B 01/2015; 91(3):035424. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.91.035424 · 3.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Micro landscaping of gold nanoparticles on a thin MoS2 film is achieved via dipping a laser-activated MoS2 film into gold chloride. On page 1792, the activated micropatterns are first created on the MoS2 film by C. H. Sow and co-workers using a scanning focused laser beam. When the activated film is subsequently immersed in gold chloride for only 10 s, gold nanoparticles are found on the modified micropatterns. These decorated MoS2 micropatterns turn out to be sensitive detectors for aromatic molecules via the production of strong SERS signals. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
    Small 01/2015; 11(15). DOI:10.1002/smll.201402591 · 7.51 Impact Factor
  • 01/2015; DOI:10.1002/adom.201400529
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    ABSTRACT: Porous graphene oxide can be used as a metal free catalyst in the presence of air for the oxidative coupling of primary amines. Herein, we explore GO-catalysed carbon-carbon or/and carbon-heteroatom bond formation strategy to functionalize primary amines in tandem to produce a series of valuable products, i. e. α-aminophosphonates, α-aminonitriles and polycyclic hetero compounds. Furthermore, when decorated with nano-Pd, the Pd-coated porous graphene oxide can be used as a bifunctional catalyst for tandem oxidation and hydrogenation reactions in the N-alkylation of primary amines, achieving good to excellent yields under mild conditions.
    Journal of the American Chemical Society 12/2014; DOI:10.1021/ja512470t · 11.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The photoelectrochemical splitting of water has attracted much attention due to its potential application for the conversion of solar energy into hydrogen fuel. Herein, we report the synthesis of a perylene derivative (perylene tetracarboxylic di-(propyl imidazole), abbreviated as PDI) which is coordinated with Co (II) ions to form a co-ordination polymer [PDI-Co(Cl)2(H2O)2]n (abbreviated as PDI-Co). The PDI-Co complex combines the photoactivity of the perylene dye with the electrocatalytic activity of the "Co(II)" centre for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). To improve charge transfer interactions, the PDI-Co complex is immobilized on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) via non-covalent interactions to form the rGO-PDI-Co complex. The composite shows good performance in multiple cycle testing and the turnover number (TON vs CoII) of this hybrid material for HER (754 after 5 hrs) is considerably higher than previously reported dye-sensitized cobalt-based catalysts.
    ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 12/2014; 7(1). DOI:10.1021/am507451c · 5.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Layer-by-layer-stacked chemical vapour deposition (CVD) graphene films find applications as transparent and conductive electrodes in solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes and touch panels. Common to lamellar-type systems with anisotropic electron delocalization, the plane-to-plane (vertical) conductivity in such systems is several orders lower than its in-plane conductivity. The poor electronic coupling between the planes is due to the presence of transfer process organic residues and trapped air pocket in wrinkles. Here we show the plane-to-plane tunnelling conductivity of stacked CVD graphene layers can be improved significantly by inserting 1-pyrenebutyric acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester between the graphene layers. The six orders of magnitude increase in plane-to-plane conductivity is due to hole doping, orbital hybridization, planarization and the exclusion of polymer residues. Our results highlight the importance of interfacial modification for enhancing the performance of LBL-stacked CVD graphene films, which should be applicable to other types of stacked two-dimensional films.
    Nature Communications 11/2014; 5:5461. DOI:10.1038/ncomms6461 · 10.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Diffusion barriers prevent materials from intermixing in electronic devices. Most diffusion barrier materials are specific for a certain combination of materials and/or change the energetics of the interface because they are insulating or add to the contact resistances. This paper presents graphene (Gr) as an electronically transparent diffusion barrier in metal/semiconductor devices, where Gr prevents Au and Cu from diffusion into the Si, and unintentionally dope the Si. We studied the electronic properties of the n-Si(111)/Gr/M Schottky barriers (with and without Gr and M = Au or Cu) by I(V) measurements and at the nano-scale by ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEEM). The layer of Gr does not change the Schottky barrier of these junctions. The Gr barrier was stable at 300 °C for 1 h and prevented the diffusion of Cu into n-Si(111) and silicide formation. Thus, we conclude that the Gr is mechanically and chemically stable enough to withstand the harsh fabrication methods typically encountered in clean room processes (e.g., deposition of metals in high vacuum conditions at high temperatures), it is electronically transparent (it does not change the energetics of the Si/Au or Si/Cu Schottky barriers), and effectively prevented diffusion of the Cu or Au into the Si.
    ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 10/2014; DOI:10.1021/am506055h · 5.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It is important to understand the structure of redox-active self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) down to the atomic scale since these SAMS are widely used as model systems in studies of mechanisms of charge transport or to realize electronic functionality in molecular electronic devices. We studied the supramolecular structure of SAMs of n-alkanethiolates with ferrocenyl (Fc) end groups (S(CH2)nFc, n = 3 or 4) on Au(111) by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In this system, the tilt angle of the Fc units with respect to the surface normal (α) depends on the value of n because the Au-S-C bond angle is fixed. The ordered domains of the SAMs were imaged by STM after annealing at 70 °C at ultra-high vacuum conditions. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) show that this annealing step only removed physisorbed material and did not affect the structure of the SAM. The STM images revealed the presence of row defects at intervals of 4 nm, i.e., six molecules. We determined by near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) that the Fc units of the SAMs of SC3Fc are more parallel to the Au(111) plane with a tilt angle α = 60.2 ° than the Fc units of SC4Fc SAMs (α = 45.4 °). These tilt angles are remarkably close to the tilt angles measured by X-ray diffraction data of bulk crystals (bc-plane). Based on our data, we conclude that the molecules are standing up and the SAMs pack into lattices that are distorted from their bulk crystal structures (because of the build-up stain due to the differences in size between the Fc units and thiolate anchoring groups).
    Langmuir 10/2014; DOI:10.1021/la503493x · 4.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Graphene-based nanomaterials are increasingly being explored for use as biomaterials for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications due to their exceptional physicochemical and mechanical properties. However, the two-dimensional nature of graphene makes it difficult to extend its applications beyond planar tissue culture. Here, graphene–cell biocomposites are used to pre-concentrate growth factors for chondrogenic differentiation. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are assembled with graphene flakes in the solution to form graphene-cell biocomposites. Increasing concentrations of graphene (G) and porous graphene oxide (pGO) are found to correlate positively with the extent of differentiation. However, beyond a certain concentration, especially in the case of graphene oxide, it will lead to decreased chondrogenesis due to increased diffusional barrier and cytotoxic effects. Nevertheless, these findings indicate that both G and pGO could serve as effective pre-concentration platforms for the construction of tissue-engineered cartilage and suspension-based cultures in vitro.
    Small 10/2014; DOI:10.1002/smll.201401635 · 7.51 Impact Factor
  • Physical Review B 09/2014; 90(11). DOI:10.1103/PhysRevB.90.119901 · 3.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Functionalized graphene oxide derivatives are found to be efficient and reusable carbocatalysts for the one-pot multicomponent Strecker reaction of aldehydes and ketones under neat and open-air conditions.
    ChemCatChem 09/2014; 6(9). DOI:10.1002/cctc.201402254 · 5.04 Impact Factor
  • Bao Yang, Hai Xu, Jiong Lu, Kian Ping Loh
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    ABSTRACT: Grain boundaries consisting of dislocation cores arranged in a periodic manner have well-defined structures and peculiar properties and can be potentially applied as conducting circuits, plasmon reflectors and phase retarders. Pentagon-heptagon (5-7) pairs or pentagon-octagon-pentagon (5-8-5) carbon rings are known to exist in graphene grain boundaries. However, there are few systematic experimental studies on the formation, structure and distribution of periodic grain boundaries in graphene. Herein, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) was applied to study periodic grain boundaries in monolayer graphene grown on a weakly interacting Cu(111) crystal. The periodic grain boundaries are formed after the thermal reconstruction of aperiodic boundaries, its structure agree well with the prediction of the coincident-site-lattice (CSL) theory. Periodic grain boundaries in quasi-freestanding graphene give sharp LDOS peaks in the tunneling spectra as opposed to the broad peaks of the aperiodic boundaries. This suggests that grain boundaries with high structural quality can introduce well-defined electronic states in graphene and modify its electronic properties.
    Journal of the American Chemical Society 08/2014; 136(34). DOI:10.1021/ja5054847 · 11.44 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

10k Citations
2,023.47 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Shenzhen University
      Bao'an, Guangdong, China
  • 2003–2014
    • National University of Singapore
      • • Department of Chemistry
      • • Department of Physics
      Tumasik, Singapore
  • 2012
    • Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology
      Urusan, Ulsan, South Korea
  • 2003–2012
    • Institute Of High Performance Computing
      Tumasik, Singapore
  • 1999
    • Tohoku University
      Miyagi, Japan