Sangyu Nam

Sungkyunkwan University, Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea

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Publications (4)3.33 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of ultrasound (US) BI-RADS category 3 lesions which were detected on screening breast US, and to suggest appropriate management. METHOD AND MATERIALS From January 2006 to December 2006, 2306 women underwent breast US as a supplemental screening test to the screening mammography. We retrospectively reviewed ultrasound images of 1666 patients with negative screening mammography or screening US only, and 689 women (41.4%) had US BI-RADS category 3 lesions. We enrolled 653 patients who had BI-RADS 3 lesions on screening US and had follow up US images for at least 24 months in this study. We reviewed clinical records and follow up mammography and US images to assess the outcome of screening US-detected BI-RADS category 3 lesions. RESULTS Four women (0.61%) with US-detected category 3 lesions showed suspicious interval change of morphology or significant increase in size of the lesions and categorized as BI-RADS category 4 during the follow up period. Only one lesion was confirmed as invasive ductal carcinoma at 21months follow up. The other 3 lesions were intraductal papilloma (n=1) and fibroadenomas (n=2). Cancer rate of the US-detected BI-RADS category 3 lesions was 0.15%. CONCLUSION Cancer rate of category 3 lesions which were detected on screening US only was very low, and short-term follow up US examination is not recommended. CLINICAL RELEVANCE/APPLICATION Category 3 lesions which were detected on screening US don't need short-term follow up US, the decrease in the number of imaging studies save cost and give convenience to the patient.
    Radiological Society of North America 2011 Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting; 11/2011
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    ABSTRACT: Recent liver multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) always covers the distal esophagus with an excellent image quality. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of faculty abdominal radiologists with those of radiology residents and endoscopists for the detection of esophageal varices and high-risk esophageal varices on liver MDCT. A total of 104 cirrhotic patients that had undergone liver MDCT 4 weeks or less before an upper endoscopy were evaluated. Two faculty abdominal radiologists, two radiology residents, and two endoscopists independently interpreted all of the CT images to detect the presence of esophageal varices and high-risk (grade 2 or 3) esophageal varices. With endoscopic grading as the reference standard, their performances were compared by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The areas under the ROC curves for the detection of esophageal varices indicated better performance of the abdominal radiologists (A(z) = 0.868), compared with the radiology residents (A(z) = 0.798) (P = 0.007) and endoscopists (A(z) = 0.784) (P = 0.006). For the detection of high-risk esophageal varices, however, the performance of the abdominal radiologists (A(z) = 0.914) was similar to those of radiology residents (A(z) = 0.900) and endoscopists (A(z) = 0.907) (each P > 0.05). Experienced readers have a better ability to detect esophageal varices on liver MDCT, but had no higher performance to evaluate high-risk esophageal varices. As the accuracy of detecting high-risk esophageal varices with clinical relevance on liver MDCT is excellent, even by endoscopists, the evaluation of esophageal varices from a recent liver MDCT may be useful to avoid the use of low-yield endoscopy.
    Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 04/2009; 24(9):1534-40. · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE/AIM 1. To retrospectively evaluate the imaging features of resected cases of benign hepatic diseases that mimic malignant tumors. 2. To learn the important imaging findings that can be overlooked or misinterpreted CONTENT ORGANIZATION 1. Introduction 2. Benign hepatic diseases mimicking malignant tumors - sclerosing hemangioma, angimyolipoma, focal nodular hyperplasia, hepatocellular adenoma, low-grade dysplasic nodule, biliary cystadenoma, inflammatory pseudotumor, eosinophilic abscess, and solitary fibrous tumor 3. Review of important findings that can be overlooked or misinterpreted SUMMARY Both knowledge of the wide spectrum of disease entities that may mimic malignant hepatic tumors and careful interpretation are important for avoiding unnecessary tests or procedures, including surgery.
    Radiological Society of North America 2007 Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting;
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE/AIM 1. To introduce the indications and techniques for achieving the artificial ascites prior to percutaneous RF ablation for hepatic tumors abutting the diaphragm or gastrointestinal tracts. 2. To present the representative cases showing therapeutic benefits or technical pitfalls of artificial ascites–assisted RF ablation. CONTENT ORGANIZATION 1. Introduction 2. Technical strategies to minimize the thermal injury A. Different approach B. Different guidance modality C. Using artificial fluid D. Using balloon catheter E. Intraluminal cooling (e.g. biliary) 3. Indication and techniques of artificial ascites 4. Therapeutic benefits of artificial ascites 5. Technical pitfalls of artificial ascites. 6. Summary SUMMARY Artificial ascites is a simple and easy technique for safe and complete ablation in case of difficult percutaneous approach. The viewer of this exhibit should accomplish to understand the indication, basic technique, therapeutic benefits, and technical pitfalls of artificial ascites – assisted RF ablation for hepatic tumors.
    Radiological Society of North America 2007 Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting;