Raphaèle Seror

Université Paris-Sud 11, Orsay, Île-de-France, France

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Publications (69)262.55 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to describe the presentation and outcomes of patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) presenting with CNS involvement.
    Rheumatology (Oxford, England) 09/2014; · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Primary Sjögren syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by mouth and eye dryness, pain, and fatigue. Hydroxychloroquine is the most frequently prescribed immunosuppressant for the syndrome. However, evidence regarding its efficacy is limited.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 07/2014; 312(3):249-58. · 29.98 Impact Factor
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    Arthritis Care & Research. 05/2014; 66(5).
  • Revue d Épidémiologie et de Santé Publique 02/2014; 62:S49-S50. · 0.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To validate the two recently developed disease activity indexes for assessment of primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS): the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) SS Patient Reported Index (ESSPRI) and the EULAR SS Disease Activity Index (ESSDAI). A prospective international 6-month duration validation study was conducted in 15 countries. At each visit, physicians completed ESSDAI, SS disease activity index (SSDAI), Sjögren's Systemic Clinical Activity Index (SCAI) and physician global assessment (PhGA); and patients completed ESSPRI, Sicca Symptoms Inventory (SSI), Profile of Fatigue and Discomfort (PROFAD) and patient global assessment (PGA). Psychometric properties (construct validity, responsiveness and reliability) were evaluated and compared between scores. Of the 395 patients included, 145 (37%) and 251 (64%) had currently active or current or past systemic manifestations, respectively. EULAR scores had higher correlation with the gold standard than other scores (ESSDAI with PhGA: r=0.59; ESSRPI with PGA: r=0.70). Correlations between patient and systemic scores were very low (ranging from 0.07 to 0.29). All systemic scores had similar large responsiveness in improved patients. Responsiveness of patient scores was low but was significantly higher for ESSPRI compared with SSI and PROFAD. Reliability was very good for all scores. ESSDAI and ESSPRI had good construct validity. All scores were reliable. Systemic scores had a large sensitivity to change in patients whose disease activity improves. Patient scores had a small sensitivity to change, however, significantly better for ESSPRI. Systemic and patient scores poorly correlated, suggesting that they are 2 complementary components that should be both evaluated, but separately.
    Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 01/2014; · 9.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lymphocytic infiltration of different exocrine and non-exocrine epithelia is the pathological hallmark of primary Sjögren's syndrome, whereas involvement of salivary and lachrymal glands with the clinical counterpart of dry eye and dry mouth are the predominant features of the disease, together with fatigue and musculoskeletal pain. In addition, systemic manifestations, like arthritis, skin vasculitis, peripheral neuropathy, glomerulonephritis, may also be present in a consistent number of patients. As result, clinical features in SS can be divided into two facets: the benign subjective but disabling manifestations such as dryness, pain and fatigue, and the systemic manifestations. In the past decades, great efforts have been made to develop valid tools for the assessment of these both facets. Disease specific questionnaires such as Profile of Fatigue and Discomfort (PROFAD) and Sicca Symptom Inventory (SSI) have been proposed for evaluation of patients' symptoms, whereas different composite indexes have been suggested for the assessment of systemic disease activity. After that, an international project supported by EULAR, emerged to develop consensus disease activity indexes: the EULAR Sjögren's Syndrome Patients Reported Index (ESSPRI), and the EULAR Sjögren's Syndrome Disease Activity Index (ESSDAI), a systemic activity index to assess systemic manifestations. Both EULAR indexes have been developed in an international collaboration to be consensual. Both indices have now been validated in a large independent international cohort. They both have been shown to be feasible, valid and reliable instruments. Also, we have found that these two scores did not correlate, suggesting that these two indexes assess two different disease components that poorly overlap, but were complementary. The sensitivity to change of both scores has been assessed, they are both able to detect change, however, ESSDAI score, like other systemic score, is more sensitive to change than ESSPRI and other patient scores. Current work is ongoing to define disease activity levels and clinically important changes for defining significant clinical improvement with the systemic score ESSDAI, and ESSPRI. We hope that this increased knowledge on the way to assess patients with primary SS, along with the emergence of new targeted therapy, will put a great input in the improvement of conduction of clinical trials in pSS.
    Journal of Autoimmunity 01/2014; · 8.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine how the results of network meta-analyses are reported. Methodological systematic review of published reports of network meta-analyses. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, Medline, and Embase, searched from inception to 12 July 2012. All network meta-analyses comparing the clinical efficacy of three or more interventions in randomised controlled trials were included, excluding meta-analyses with an open loop network of three interventions. The reporting of the network and results was assessed. A composite outcome included the description of the network (number of interventions, direct comparisons, and randomised controlled trials and patients for each comparison) and the reporting of effect sizes derived from direct evidence, indirect evidence, and the network meta-analysis. 121 network meta-analyses (55 published in general journals; 48 funded by at least one private source) were included. The network and its geometry (network graph) were not reported in 100 (83%) articles. The effect sizes derived from direct evidence, indirect evidence, and the network meta-analysis were not reported in 48 (40%), 108 (89%), and 43 (36%) articles, respectively. In 52 reports that ranked interventions, 43 did not report the uncertainty in ranking. Overall, 119 (98%) reports of network meta-analyses did not give a description of the network or effect sizes from direct evidence, indirect evidence, and the network meta-analysis. This finding did not differ by journal type or funding source. The results of network meta-analyses are heterogeneously reported. Development of reporting guidelines to assist authors in writing and readers in critically appraising reports of network meta-analyses is timely.
    BMJ (online) 01/2014; 348:g1741. · 17.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Increased expression of B cell activating factor (BAFF or B lymphocyte stimulator) may explain the B cell activation characteristic of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). To evaluate the efficacy and safety of belimumab, targeting BAFF, in patients with pSS. Patients were included in this bi-centric prospective 1-year open-label trial if they fulfilled American European Consensus group criteria, were anti-Sjögren's syndrome A-positive and had current systemic complications or salivary gland enlargement, or early disease (<5 years), or biomarkers of B cell activation. They received belimumab, 10 mg/kg, at weeks 0, 2 and 4 and then every 4 weeks to week 24. The primary end-point, assessed at week 28, was improvement in two of five items: reduction in ≥30% in dryness score on a visual analogue scale (VAS), ≥30% in fatigue VAS score, ≥30% in VAS pain score, ≥30% in systemic activity VAS assessed by the physician and/or >25% improvement in any B cell activation biomarker values. Among 30 patients included, the primary end-point was achieved in 18 (60%). The mean (SD) European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Sjögren's Syndrome Disease Activity Index decreased from 8.8 (7.4) to 6.3 (6.6) (p=0.0015) and EULAR) Sjögren's Syndrome Patient Reported Index from 6.4 (1.1) to 5.6 (2.0) (p=0.0174). The mean dryness, fatigue and pain VAS varied from 7.8 (1.8) to 6.2 (2.9) (p=0.0021), 6.9 (1.8) to 6.0 (2.2) (p=0.0606) and 4.6 (2.6) to 4.7 (2.4) (p=0.89), respectively. Salivary flow and Schirmer's test did not change. These encouraging results justify future randomised controlled trials of belimumab in a selected target population of pSS patients most likely to benefit from treatment.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 12/2013; · 8.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective Patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) are at greater risk of developing lymphoma. This study was undertaken to evaluate whether the Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt-3L) might be associated with lymphoma in primary SS. Methods Serum levels of Flt-3L were measured in 369 patients with primary SS from the French Assessment of Systemic Signs and Evolution of Sjögren's Syndrome study cohort and in 10 patients with primary SS at the time of lymphoma diagnosis in an Italian cohort. Associations between increased levels of Flt-3L and a history of lymphoma, history of previously diagnosed criteria related to a high risk of lymphoma, and greater extent of disease activity were evaluated. ResultsAmong patients with primary SS, higher levels of Flt-3L were significantly associated with a history of lymphoma (P = 0.0001). Previous markers for risk of lymphoma development, such as presence of purpura, low levels of C4, presence of lymphocytopenia, low levels of IgM, high levels of β2-microglobulin, and a higher primary SS disease activity score, were all associated with higher levels of Flt-3L. The levels of Flt-3L were also increased in serum obtained from patients with primary SS at the time of lymphoma diagnosis. Furthermore, the Flt-3L levels were elevated in the serum of 6 patients up to 94 months (mean 46 months) prior to the diagnosis of lymphoma. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that an Flt-3L level of 175 pg/ml was the ideal cutoff value for demonstrating an association with lymphoma (specificity 97.5%, sensitivity 44%, negative predictive value 97%). Conclusion Flt-3L is associated with lymphoma in primary SS, and constitutes a good biologic marker. Higher levels of this cytokine are present several years before the diagnosis of lymphoma, and may be useful as a predictive marker of lymphoproliferative disorders in primary SS.
    Arthritis & Rheumatology 12/2013; 65(12). · 7.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the prevalence, characteristics, and outcome of cutaneous ischemia, and whether it can occur in systemic necrotizing vasculitides (SNVs), i.e., polyarteritis nodosa, granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all patients with SNV who were included in the French Vasculitis Study Group cohort database between March 1963 and September 2007. We compared characteristics and outcomes for patients with and without cutaneous ischemia (digital necrosis and/or isolated necrotic cutaneous ulcers). Among the 1304 patients with a diagnosis of SNVs, 40 (3.1%) had digital necrosis and 25 (1.9%) had isolated necrotic cutaneous ulcers, with an equal distribution among SNVs. Presence of cutaneous ischemia was associated with past and/or current smoking [odds ratio (OR), 1.73; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.02-2.95] and history of coronary artery disease (2.40; 1.01-6.00), as well as with other cutaneous manifestations (6.54; 3.21-8.67), gastrointestinal tract perforations (4.29; 1.41-13.07), and arthralgias (1.84; 1.10-3.07) during diagnosis. Ten patients with digital necrosis underwent extremity amputation, but no patient with isolated necrotic cutaneous ulcers (p = 0.007) underwent it. Smoking was the main risk factor of amputation (OR, 9.1; 1.7-48.9). At a mean follow-up of 10 years, cutaneous ischemia was identified as an independent predictor of vasculitis relapse (hazard ratio, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.05-2.05) and all-cause death (1.66; 1.01-2.74). Cutaneous ischemia is a rare manifestation of SNVs but is associated with an increased risk of relapse and mortality. Tobacco use is associated with amputation, which emphasizes the importance of managing conventional cardiovascular risk factors in SNV patients.
    Seminars in arthritis and rheumatism 10/2013; · 4.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To describe the epidemiology of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) in a multi-racial/ethnic population. Methods: A cross-sectional study, with 5 case-retrieval sources, identified adults with pSS living in the Greater Paris area (population 1,172,482 adults) in 2007. Diagnoses were verified by the American-European Consensus Group (AECG) criteria and study-specific enlarged criteria based on the presence of ≥3/4 AECG items among subjective oral or ocular dryness, anti-SSA/SSB positivity and positive minor salivary-gland biopsy results. Prevalence estimates were standardized to those for the world population and 5-source capture-recapture analysis (CRA) was used. Racial/ethnic differences in pSS features were evaluated. Results: In all, 133 subjects met the AECG criteria and 203 the enlarged criteria. The 2007 prevalence of pSS was 1.02 per 10,000 adults (95% confidence interval 0.85-1.22) for AECG criteria and 1.52 per 10,000 adults (1.30-1.76) for enlarged criteria. CRA indicated completeness of case findings of ~90%. Compared to subjects with European background, those with non-European background had 2.1-2.3 times higher pSS prevalence and were younger (P < 0.0001) and more likely to have polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia (P < 0.0001) and SSA/SSB-antibodies (P = 0.0005 and < 0.0001 for AECG and enlarged criteria, respectively). Conclusion: The figure of 1.02-1.52 per 10,000 adults we found and estimates from the few other population-based census surveys support that the prevalence of diagnosed pSS is between 1 and 10 per 10,000 (0.01-0.1%) of the general population. Non-European race/ethnicity may be associated with increased pSS risk and a distinct disease profile. © 2013 American College of Rheumatology.
    Arthritis care & research. 08/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) Sjögren's Syndrome (SS) Disease Activity Index (ESSDAI) and the EULAR SS Patient-Reported Index (ESSPRI) were recently developed. We aimed to determine whether patients' symptoms differed between patients with and without systemic involvement and if the disease-specific indices correlated with each other in primary SS. Methods Fifteen French centers included 395 primary SS patients in the Assessment of Systemic Signs and Evolution in Sjögren's Syndrome Cohort. At enrollment, physicians completed the ESSDAI, the SS Disease Activity Index (SSDAI), and the Sjögren's Systemic Clinical Activity Index (SCAI), and patients completed the ESSPRI, the Sicca Symptoms Inventory, and the Profile of Fatigue and Discomfort. All scores were compared between patients with and without systemic involvement. Correlations between scores of systemic activity and patients' symptoms were obtained. ResultsAt enrollment, 120 (30.4%) patients had never experienced systemic complication and 155 (39.2%) patients and 120 (30.4%) patients had, respectively, only past or current systemic manifestations. Past or current systemic patients had higher levels of symptoms, except dryness. The ESSDAI did not correlate with the patient-scored ESSPRI (rho = 0.06, P = 0.30), whereas the SSDAI and the SCAI, which include subjective items, did correlate (rho = 0.28 and 0.25, respectively; P < 0.0001 for both). Conclusion Alterations of common patient-reported outcomes are present in all patients with primary SS, including those with systemic complications. However, patient symptoms and systemic complications are 2 different facets of primary SS. Therefore, the use of both systemic and patients' indices, such as the ESSDAI and ESSPRI, are useful. Since these 2 facets weakly overlap, one should identify which of both components is the main target of the treatment to test, when designing clinical trials in primary SS.
    Arthritis Care & Research. 08/2013; 65(8).
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    Arthritis Care & Research. 08/2013; 65(8).
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the effect of adding a 10-week treatment of adalimumab to a standardised treatment with corticosteroids on the ability to taper more rapidly corticosteroid doses in patients with newly diagnosed giant cell arteritis (GCA). Patients included in this double-blind, multicentre controlled trial were randomly assigned to receive a 10-week subcutaneous treatment of adalimumab 40 mg every other week or placebo in addition to a standard prednisone regimen (starting dose 0.7 mg/kg per day). The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients in remission on less than 0.1 mg/kg of prednisone at week 26. Analysis was performed by intention to treat (ITT). Among the 70 patients enrolled (adalimumab, n=34; placebo, n=36), 10 patients did not receive the scheduled treatment, seven in the adalimumab and three in the placebo group. By ITT, the number of patients achieving the primary endpoint was 20 (58.9%) and 18 (50.0%) in the adalimumab and placebo arm, respectively (p=0.46). The decrease in prednisone dose and the proportion of patients who were relapse free did not differ between the two groups. Serious adverse events occurred in five (14.7%) patients on adalimumab and 17 (47.2%) on placebo, including serious infections in three patients on adalimumab and five on placebo. Two patients died in the placebo arm (septic shock and cancer) and one in the adalimumab group (pneumonia). In patients with newly diagnosed GCA, adding a 10-week treatment of adalimumab to prednisone did not increase the number of patients in remission on less than 0.1 mg/kg of corticosteroids at 6 months. NCT00305539.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 07/2013; · 8.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. To determine the pattern of demyelinating disorders (DDs) occurring during anti-TNF-α therapy.Methods. Between June 2005 and April 2008, 1800 French rheumatologists and internists were contacted to report cases of DDs occurring in patients treated with anti-TNF-α.Results. After a median of 10.2 (1.5-39.9) months of treatment, 33 patients developed DDs: 22 had CNS and 11 peripheral nervous system (PNS) involvement. Underlying diseases were RA (n = 16), AS (n = 11), PsA (n = 4), JIA (n = 1) and PM (n = 1). Anti-TNF-α was infliximab (n = 15), etanercept (n = 12) or adalimumab (n = 6). CNS involvement was encephalic lesions (n = 16), transverse myelitis (n = 8) or retrobulbar optic neuritis (n = 5). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis in 16 patients and MRI in 20 patients were abnormal. All patients discontinued anti-TNF-α. Fifteen patients required steroids. Twenty patients initially improved. Five patients developed multiple sclerosis. PNS involvement was chronic (n = 9) or acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (n = 2). CSF analysis revealed an increased protein level in nine patients. Nerve conduction studies confirmed DD in all these patients. Anti-TNF-α was discontinued in 10 patients and 8 received i.v. immunoglobulins. Two patients relapsed after introduction of another anti-TNF-α. Overall, a causal relationship between anti-TNF-α and DD was considered as probable in 31 patients and definite in 2 who had positive rechallenge.Conclusion. Causal relationship between anti-TNF-α and induction of DD remains unclear, but in some cases the chronology of clinical events is suggestive. Nevertheless, DD might persist despite treatment discontinuation, suggesting that anti-TNF-α could trigger the demyelinating process, which further evolves independently.
    Rheumatology (Oxford, England) 01/2013; · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To analyze the clinical and immunological characteristics at enrollment in a large prospective cohort of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) and to investigate the association between serum BAFF, beta2-microglobulin and free light chains of immunoglobulins and systemic disease activity at enrollment. Three hundred and ninety five patients with pSS according to American-European Consensus Criteria were included from fifteen centers of Rheumatology and Internal Medicine in the "Assessment of Systemic Signs and Evolution of Sjögren's Syndrome" (ASSESS) 5-year prospective cohort. At enrollment, serum markers were assessed as well as activity of the disease measured with the EULAR Sjögren's Syndrome Disease Activity Index (ESSDAI). Patient median age was 58 (25(th)-75(th): 51-67) and median disease duration was 5 (2-9) years. Median ESSDAI at enrollment was 2 (0-7) with 30.9% of patients having features of systemic involvement. Patients with elevated BAFF, beta2-microglobulin and kappa, lambda FLCS had higher ESSDAI scores at enrollment (4 [2]-[11] vs 2 [0-7], P = 0.03; 4 [1]-[11] vs 2 [0-7], P< 0.0001); 4 [2]-[10] vs 2 [0-6.6], P< 0.0001 and 4 [2-8.2] vs 2 [0-7.0], P = 0.02, respectively). In multivariate analysis, increased beta2-microglobulin, kappa and lambda FLCs were associated with a higher ESSDAI score. Median BAFF and beta2-microglobulin were higher in the 16 patients with history of lymphoma (1173.3(873.1-3665.5) vs 898.9 (715.9-1187.2) pg/ml, P = 0.01 and 2.6 (2.2-2.9) vs 2.1 (1.8-2.6) mg/l, P = 0.04, respectively). In pSS, higher levels of beta2-microglobulin and free light chains of immunoglobulins are associated with increased systemic disease activity.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(5):e59868. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine whether network meta-analyses, increasingly used to assess comparative effectiveness of healthcare interventions, follow the key methodological recommendations for reporting and conduct of systematic reviews. Methodological systematic review of reports of network meta-analyses. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, Medline, and Embase, searched from inception to 12 July 2012. All network meta-analyses comparing clinical efficacy of three or more interventions based on randomised controlled trials, excluding meta-analyses with an open loop network of three interventions. We assessed the reporting of general characteristics and key methodological components of the systematic review process using two composite outcomes. For some components, if reporting was adequate, we assessed their conduct quality. Of 121 network meta-analyses covering a wide range of medical areas, 100 (83%) assessed pharmacological interventions and 11 (9%) non-pharmacological interventions; 56 (46%) were published in journals with a high impact factor. The electronic search strategy for each database was not reported in 88 (73%) network meta-analyses; for 36 (30%), the primary outcome was not clearly identified. Overall, 61 (50%) network meta-analyses did not report any information regarding the assessment of risk of bias of individual studies, and 103 (85%) did not report any methods to assess the likelihood of publication bias. Overall, 87 (72%) network meta-analyses did not report the literature search, searched only one database, did not search other sources, or did not report an assessment of risk of bias of individual studies. These methodological components did not differ by publication in a general or specialty journal or by public or private funding. Essential methodological components of the systematic review process-conducting a literature search and assessing risk of bias of individual studies-are frequently lacking in reports of network meta-analyses, even when published in journals with high impact factors.
    BMJ (online) 01/2013; 347:f3675. · 17.22 Impact Factor
  • La Revue de Médecine Interne. 01/2013; 34:A42.
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    ABSTRACT: Objective Earlier studies of eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss) (EGPA), with limited patient numbers and followup durations, demonstrated that clinical presentation at diagnosis, but not outcome, differed according to antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) status. This study was undertaken to describe the main characteristics of a larger patient cohort and their long-term outcomes. MethodsA retrospective study of EGPA patients in the French Vasculitis Study Group cohort who satisfied the American College of Rheumatology criteria and/or Chapel Hill definitions was conducted. Patient characteristics and outcomes were compared according to ANCA status and year of diagnosis. ResultsWe identified 383 patients diagnosed between 1957 and June 2009 (128 [33.4%] before 1997 or earlier) and followed up for a mean ± SD of 66.8 ± 62.5 months. At diagnosis, their mean ± SD age was 50.3 ± 15.7 years, and 91.1% had asthma (duration 9.3 ± 10.8 years). Main manifestations included peripheral neuropathy (51.4%); ear, nose, and throat (ENT) signs (48.0%); skin lesions (39.7%); lung infiltrates (38.6%); and cardiomyopathy (16.4%). Among the 348 patients tested at diagnosis for ANCA, the 108 ANCA-positive patients (31.0%) had significantly more frequent ENT manifestations, peripheral neuropathy, and/or renal involvement, but less frequent cardiac manifestations, than the ANCA-negative patients. Vasculitis relapses occurred in 35.2% of the ANCA-positive versus 22.5% of the ANCA-negative patients (P = 0.01), and 5.6% versus 12.5%, respectively, died (P < 0.05). The 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 58.1% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 45.6–68.6) for ANCA-positive and 67.8% (95% CI 59.8–74.5) for ANCA-negative patients (P = 0.35). Multivariable analysis identified cardiomyopathy, older age, and diagnosis during or prior to 1996 as independent risk factors for death and lower eosinophil count at diagnosis as predictive of relapse. Conclusion The characteristics and long-term outcomes of EGPA patients differ according to their ANCA status. Although EGPA relapses remain frequent, mortality has declined, at least since 1996.
    Arthritis & Rheumatology 01/2013; 65(1). · 7.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequencies and types of ophthalmologic manifestations in patients with systemic necrotizing vasculitides (SNV), including polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) and ANCA-associated vasculitides (granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's, GPA), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA); Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS)) and review the literature on eye involvement in these diseases. METHODS: This retrospective analysis was conducted on the ophthalmologic manifestations of SNV patients entered into the French Vasculitis Study Group database between July 1955 and August 2008. RESULTS: Among the 1286 identified patients, 214 (16.6%) had ophthalmologic manifestations at diagnosis, significantly more often in GPA (117/343, 34.1%) than in EGPA (30/270, 11.1%; P = 0.0001), PAN (42/393, 10.7%; P = 0.0001) or MPA (25/280, 8.9%; P = 0.0001). The 3 most common recorded ophthalmologic manifestations were conjunctivitis (89, (7%)), episcleritis (56, (4%)), and/or blurred vision (44, (3%)), mainly caused by retinal vasculitis in 5, oculomotor nerve palsy in 4, uveitis in 4 and/or optic neuropathy in 3. Orbital inflammatory tumor, another common feature was rather specific to GPA (23/349, 6.6% (P = 0.0001)) compared to other SNV. The literature on ophthalmologic manifestations of SNV is limited to case reports except for GPA, in which the eye involvement frequency ranged from 29% to 57%. CONCLUSIONS: Eye manifestations were more common in GPA than MPA, PAN and EGPA, but can be sight-threatening in any SNV. Given the heterogeneity of ophthalmologic involvement in SNV, close collaboration between the ophthalmologists and internists is critical.
    Seminars in arthritis and rheumatism 12/2012; · 4.72 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

617 Citations
262.55 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010–2014
    • Université Paris-Sud 11
      Orsay, Île-de-France, France
    • Paris Diderot University
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • Université Paris Descartes
      • Faculté de Médecine
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2013
    • French Institute of Health and Medical Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2006–2012
    • Université René Descartes - Paris 5
      • Faculté de Médecine
      Paris, Ile-de-France, France
  • 2011
    • Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris
      • Département de Médecine Interne
      Paris, Ile-de-France, France
  • 2008
    • Unité Inserm U1077
      Caen, Lower Normandy, France